1000 hours in a jet aircraft

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by FlyMil, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. FlyMil

    FlyMil New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    hey guys, I read you needed 1000 hours in a jet aircraft to apply for an astronaut position. What does this actually mean, does that also me you could be a kc-135 pilot and still become an astronaut pilot. Also... i know most astronaut pilots/commanders have flown on fighters, but does the jet aircraft rule also apply to b2 spirit bomber pilots as well? or is there like a ban due to secrecy or something like that.

    Just curious

    thanks... http://www.serviceacademyforums.com/images/smilies/thumb.gif
     
  2. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,852
    Likes Received:
    342
    There is no requirement to be a "fighter pilot" to be an astronaut.

    But if you are not a graduate of one of the military test pilot programs (if you're military) you have ZERO chance.

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
  3. SamAca10

    SamAca10 Ensign - DWO

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    2
    I don't think Captain Burbank went to test pilot school. Here's is biographical data from NASA: http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/burbank.html

    In order to be an astronaut you do have to have a technical degree, so think Engineering, Math, or Science...
     
  4. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,852
    Likes Received:
    342
    True, it doesn't appear he did.

    But reading his bio, it appears he's NOT a "Nasa Pilot" but rather a "Mission Specialist."

    Not that I care: astronaut is a pretty awesome position!! :thumb:

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,800
    Likes Received:
    932
    I think one thing that is getting lost in the mix is the key words 1000 hrs. Flieger and Bullet can tell you in the fighter world that takes a long, long time to get there.

    Avg mission is maybe 2 hrs and you don't fly everyday of the week. To get that many hours you are looking at about 7-8 yrs.

    On top of that you spend yrs at NASA before you go up. Mike Goode was on the mission to repair the Hubble. He also didn't get up there until he was a COLONEL. He was selected for NASA back in 1996 or 97 (can't remember), it took him @13 more yrs to get up there. He went to TPS in 93, which basically means it was a 20+ yr mission for him. Went to UNT in 1987/88. 111 FTU in 89. Operational in 90.

    It is a very very long haul.
     
  6. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4,628
    Likes Received:
    5
    Applicants for the Astronaut Candidate Program must meet the basic education requirements for NASA engineering and scientific positions - specifically: successful completion of standard professional curriculum in an accredited college or university leading to at least a bachelor's degree with major study in an appropriate field of engineering, biological science, physical science, or mathematics.

    The following degree fields, while related to engineering and the sciences, are not considered qualifying:

    • Degrees in Technology (Engineering Technology, Aviation Technology, Medical Technology, etc.)
    • Degrees in Psychology (except for Clinical Psychology, Physiological Psychology, or Experimental Psychology which are qualifying).
    • Degrees in Nursing.
    • Degrees in Exercise Physiology or similar fields
    • Degrees in Social Sciences (Geography, Anthropology, Archaeology, etc.).
    • Degrees in Aviation, Aviation Management, or similar fields.

    FYI - There IS a requirement to have at least 1,000 hours pilot-in-command time in jet aircraft to qualify as a Astronaut Candidate Pilot. Flight test experience is highly desirable.

    Basic Qualifications - Astronaut Candidate
     
  7. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,852
    Likes Received:
    342
    Luigi is dead-on accurate here! :thumb:

    My comment on "...if you're not a test pilot graduate your chances are zero" was based upon the military member wishing to be a NASA astronaut pilot. Past experience with my friends who have applied, and in conversations with the USAF Test Pilot School commander said just this.

    But as Luigi points out, it is not REQUIRED, just HIGHLY desirable!

    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
  8. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,800
    Likes Received:
    932
    Flieger, and the circle of military life is complete again...

    You don't have to be TPS, but to get NASA you will meet...ANOTHER BOARD!

    Who do they select? The candidate with TPS or the candidate that is not a TPS grad?

    So in essence, these people not only have to get a UPT slot (board), they than have to get TPS (board) and finally Nasa (board)
     
  9. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2010
    Messages:
    4,275
    Likes Received:
    606
    Sucks to be a fighter pilot... :smile:
     
  10. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2007
    Messages:
    4,628
    Likes Received:
    5
    And being a test pilot doesn't always mean "fixed wing." :thumb:

    The first USCG astronaut (Bruce Melnick) was the chief test pilot at the Coast Guard Aircraft Program Office who flew all of the acceptance test flights for the HH-65 helicopter, including sea trials, and wrote the HH-65 flight manual.
     
  11. SamAca10

    SamAca10 Ensign - DWO

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Messages:
    1,019
    Likes Received:
    2
    Here's some info about Bruce Melnick from our Boards Packet:

    :thumb:

    Becoming an astronaut would be the dream job...just gotta get through the steps.

    1. Get through 4/c Year
    2. Graduate from the Academy
    3. Serve on a Cutter for the Ensign Tour
    4. Selected to attend flight school
    5. Graduate flight school
    6. Get selected by NASA
    7. Go through NASA training

    As Pima pointed out, there are a lot of boards to go through in order to get those astronaut wings....
     
  12. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    4,826
    Likes Received:
    2
    To be fair, one does not need to even be a pilot to be a Mission Specialist.
    One of the mission specialists on Discovery right now is a Submariner. Many mission specialist's are physicians or scientists.
     
  13. GSKeziah

    GSKeziah Member

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2010
    Messages:
    130
    Likes Received:
    0


    Is Military Science a qualifying degree? (I don't want to be an astronaut I am just curious.)

    Isn't the space program going to start moving away from the government and move more towards the private sector? I could be wrong though but if this is true what do the people on the forums think about this?
     
  14. Hurricane12

    Hurricane12 USNA 2012

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2011
    Messages:
    740
    Likes Received:
    120
    Or SEALs.

    http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/cassidy-cj.html
     
  15. jake s

    jake s USMA Cadet

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2009
    Messages:
    325
    Likes Received:
    0
    While I'm no expert, I don't think Military Science would be considered a "qualifying degree" by NASA.

    That's an interesting question you ask about commercial vs. private. I have a cousin who works for NASA and he believes that the growth of the commercial space industry will only help the government space programs such as NASA or the European Space Agency get more advanced technology. They will probably leap frog each other on R&D type stuff as time goes on.
     
  16. patentesq

    patentesq Parent

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,587
    Likes Received:
    0
    When I was in the Army, NASA issued a special bulletin calling on officers to apply for Mission Specialists. There were only three requirements:

    1. Commissioned officer in the US Army.

    2. Science undergraduate degree.

    3. Pass a flight physical.

    I applied but wasn't accepted. I suspect that NASA was more interested in helo/fixed wing pilots than Infantry officers.


    I had a conversation with David Wolf a couple of weeks ago on this subject. He thinks that there will be an enormous need for physicians as the space program goes commercial. Here's his bio: http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/wolf.html. In addition to his 2000 hours of flight time, my FAVORITE biographical tidbit for Dr. Wolf is: "Dr. Wolf has received 15 U.S. Patents, published over 40 technical publications or papers, and received over 20 Space Act Awards primarily for 3-dimensional tissue engineering technologies for which he received the Texas State Bar Patent of the Year in 1994."

    Your probability of chances seems to be a bit low, flieger83. See David Wolf's bio above.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2011
  17. Bullet

    Bullet Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Messages:
    994
    Likes Received:
    99
    MY favorite biographical tidbit for Dr. Wolf?

    "He has logged over 2000 hours of flight time including air combat training as a weapons systems officer (F4 Phantom jet)..."

    BTW, I think Steve was referring to Shuttle pilot by his "zero chance w/out TPS" statement, which is most likely 100% correct. I agree with you that Mission Specialists do not have this requirement (having a PhD or a medical degree being more competitive for selection for that job).
     
  18. patentesq

    patentesq Parent

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,587
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for clarification, Bullet. I should know never to question anything that flieger (or you) says.

    BTW, did you see this stat on Dr. Wolf's bio: "Dr. Wolf has logged 168 days, 12 hours, 56 minutes, 04 seconds in space over four separate missions . . . ."?

    04 seconds?????? Wow. It must be very tough duty to be a rocket man!!
     
  19. Bullet

    Bullet Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Messages:
    994
    Likes Received:
    99
    Making sure you properly log your flight time: VERY important part of the job! :shake:

    Getting it down to the second DOES seem just a little excessive to me. I wonder if in the NASA lounge, the Astronauts sit there, beer in hand, and say to each other: "well, I have 20 more seconds of space time than you!" :biggrin:
     
  20. luckymacy

    luckymacy Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2010
    Messages:
    291
    Likes Received:
    0
    Micro G time, orbits, EVA time, and stuff like that are something they DO care a lot about, and so does NASA, but the astronauts don't have to worry about keeping track of anything. Bieng a First or the Longest is bragging rights. There's an army of engineers and technicians on the ground that do it all 'keeping track' for them! They have a lot of support and help even with their ground jobs. It's a sweet gig if you can get it and very marketable once you leave. I've never worked with one or been around one that wasn't afraid someone would pinch them and they'd wake and it'd all be over.
     

Share This Page