12 quit on I-Day

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by cajost, Jul 2, 2014.

  1. cajost

    cajost Member

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    We are proud to share that Victoria survived I-Day. But we were shocked when she shared that 12 kids quit yesterday. Question to those in the know: is this typically?
     
  2. MiddyB

    MiddyB Member

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    Typical. Yes, unfortunately, it is. It also is very frustrating to those of us who would've loved nothing more than to have been there yesterday in their stead. BTW, congratulations to you and your DD!


    Sent using the Service Academy Forums® mobile app
     
  3. OrionT-56

    OrionT-56 Parent

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    Historically, a few always drop. Believe all 250 USCGA Swabs made it through R day on Monday. Best wishes to all the new service academy swabs, plebes, cadets and fellow parents!
     
  4. cajost

    cajost Member

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    It was a very impressive day. Very organized. The parents briefing was not only informative, but those guys have a great sense of humor.

    Victoria met us at her "letter" and she chowed down the food I brought for her and was smiling and happy and shared about all the stuff they did. She had us laughing when she told us about being watched while she gave her piss test.

    I'm sure more stories to come.
     
  5. hthp37

    hthp37 Member

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    It was impressive. I can't say my son was "laughing", but he wasn't crying either so I'll take that as a positive sign.
    His Dad asked him if he wanted to return for another day and the reply was "definitely". Fingers crossed, prayers and good thoughts for all of them.
     
  6. USNA13DAD

    USNA13DAD Member

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    I would be shocked

    I would be shocked if it turns out that, that number of candidates dropped on I Day. To be fair a lot rumors spread quickly about drops on the first day and during Plebe Summer and for the most part the Plebes are kept in the dark about what they are going to be doing next nevermind what it is going on with the rest of the brigade. But for the most part the retention numbers have been very high for plebes surviving through plebe summer in the last decade.

    Congrats to all your plebes and congratulations to you the parents as I day can be a very tough day for parents, especially if they are your first to leave the nest.
     
  7. Vista123

    Vista123 Member

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    +1
     
  8. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    A couple of years ago, only 10-11 plebes dropped the entire summer, so I would be surprised if it was 12 on I-Day this year. Typically, there may a no-show or two and a couple who refuse to take the Oath.
     
  9. ahs67

    ahs67 Member

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    I did ask my son yesterday if there were any kids who quit yesterday and he replied "they wouldn't tell us even if there were."
     
  10. GoNavyPro

    GoNavyPro Member

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    In our company alone last year we had 2 not show on I-day and then 3 more drop over the course of the summer so yes it is common.
     
  11. Ex.BT.USN

    Ex.BT.USN Member

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    Why...

    Why would these kids go through all the hoops and quit? It can't be an easy decision.
     
  12. 2KPsons

    2KPsons Member

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    You ask a great question, and for some of the kids, the answer is that they went through all the hoops for their parents. I saw the same thing when my sons went to USMMA - a number of young men and women left very quickly, as it had not really been their dream, it was their parents' dream. When faced with the reality on I-Day they do what they feel is right for them.

    I actually spoke to a recruited athlete who elected to leave after the first couple of days. He said he had not felt such relief since the process had begun - it started with a recruiting call from a coach and quickly became his parents' goal. He felt steamrolled, but when push came to shove and he had reported, he decided it was not right for him and he left.

    I am not saying that this is the case for all who choose to leave, but I think it happens more frequently than most of us would care to admit.

    From many of the posts on the "roller coaster/waiting for the mailman" threads (and now also on the reapplication threads) I often get the sense that many of the parents lose sight of the fact that it is their son or daughter doing this and not the parent. It is great to support them, but not to the extent that they are being pushed into something that they might not really want.
     
  13. CessnaMan

    CessnaMan Member

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    Too bad they couldn't have figured it out a few weeks/months ago so someone who really wanted that spot could get the opportunity...

    I know one of the CGA folks (I think it was an admin officer) said they even had someone show up who said "we have to wear uniforms?"

    I think that the CGA has it right with their AIM program. They make that week just like the swab summer will be so there is no misunderstanding about what's going to happen.
     
  14. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    First day (or first week) drop outs tend to be the folks who weren't fully aware of what they were joining.

    "They're yelling at us!"

    You would be surprised find find out some people don't know much about the actually school they plan to attend. That first day or first week can be quite the shock! :eek:
     
  15. parentalunit2

    parentalunit2 Parent

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    Yes, that is completely par for the course. Admissions builds in an attrition percentage to each class and that attrition does in fact begin on I-Day. And when you say that a certain number ‘quit’ on I-Day, you do not know the full story. There are always medical situations that come to light the first day, some that result in turnbacks and some that are completely disqualifying. (Yes, even after the whole DODMERB process.) And then there are always those who are completely overwhelmed and do not make it to swearing in. Plus what people above said about parents. The sleek and shiny admissions brochures and the fun of attending one football game at an academy is very much not the reality of being a student there. Especially on day one.

    It may seem shocking to you, but it happens each and every year at every academy.
     
  16. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    I think the stress and tension of realizing what they are getting into drives some of these. That is, in fact, a normal part of any weeding out process. Whether enlisted or any of the programs that lead to becoming an officer, some kids will drop very early. It's not so much that they didn't want it at some level (for most anyway, IMHO) but the pressure of the anticipation of the hell they think is coming.
     
  17. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    This assumes that those other folks would have stayed. Not sure that's a valid assumption. There is an effort to weed out those who aren't doing it for themselves, but it's not an easy task. Nor is it a precise one.

    I had a candidate a few years ago whom I was pretty sure was applying to USNA b/c his dad wanted him to. He is at USNA now, wearing "stars" (meaning he's excelling across the board) and loving it. Was I right? Was I wrong? Did he enter for one reason and stay for another? Who knows.

    I can't speak for AIM but NASS is a recruiting tool, not a mock PS. Also, only about 1/3 of the folks who do NASS will end up attending USNA. They can't take everyone who will apply or even know who will apply.

    USNA tries hard -- through BGOs, coaches, written/on-line materials, etc. -- to make sure people understand what a SA is about. Some don't pay attention. Others read/listen but don't internalize. Others think they understand until they are in the midst of it.

    In an ideal world, every one of the 1200 folks who are offered appointments would stay the entire four years and graduate. But, doesn't happen -- at USNA or any other SA.
     
  18. Blackbird

    Blackbird Parent

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    On USAFA I-Day, DS had a Basic who was crying on the initial bus bringing the Basics up the hill. The guy didn't get off the bus and just went home. Wow with YouTube I really don't get how that happens.
     
  19. jiller59

    jiller59 Member

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    Awww, this makes me feel like crying; poor kid. In many cases I don't think parents realize the pressure they are putting on their kids (yes, I am a parent and speak from experience). Some kids won't speak their minds to their parents until they come to a breaking point. :frown:
     
  20. MedB

    MedB Parent

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    Certainly there are some kids that go for their parents/families instead of themselves.

    But let's not forget that as amazing as these young people are, they are still only teenagers. You know... the same people whom society has deemed not yet responsible enough to have a beer, or vote for their town mayor. So is it really a surprise that some of them change thier mind or have second thoughts when the gravity of their situation and committment finally becomes real?

    We don't say most run-away-brides happen because of parents. So maybe we just need to remember that part of being young means sometimes not being able/willing change course until the very last minute.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2014

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