2013 NROTC transfer applicant! Someone help!

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by NavyBound, Sep 12, 2012.

  1. NavyBound

    NavyBound Member

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    I believe I'm in a unique situation right now, and my recruiters aren't helping me AT ALL. In March of 2012, I applied for the 2013 NROTC scholarship. I applied so early because they told me that after March it would be too late because my Spring semester college credits would count against me. Since I had 17 credits at the time, I was still eligible since I applied before I hit 30 credits. I now have 33 credits, and am in my 3rd semester of college. I take 17 credit hours per semester, so I'll be graduating with an AA degree with about 67 credits. To all the schools on my list that I will be applying to for this scholarship, I will be considered a transfer student. And will only have 2 years or so left to earn my engineering degree. Will these school NROTC units still take me? What I'd like to do is either dual major or get my Masters right after my BS to take advantage of the 4 year scholarship. But I don't even know if this is allowed! Like I said, my recruiters are no help. Which is sad because I applied so early so it's not like they were bogged down with applicants or interviews. I was like one of the first kids to have their interview in my entire city!

    Also, if I don't get the scholarship, what can I do to join ROTC at another school? Am I too "old" or will I have "too many credits" once I transfer? Will OCS be my last option?

    If someone out there can just please give me some insight I'd be so grateful!

    Thanks!
     
  2. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    This thread needs to be moved to ROTC forums.
     
  3. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    OK, this is just a guess.

    Basically, I think it is possible that whoever advised you didn't understand the time frame of the HS Scholarship award program for HS Seniors graduating in May/June 2012. I think you didn't apply "so early", but rather, you applied way too late.

    If you were shooting for a Fall, 2012 NROTC entry, the time to complete your High School Scholarship application would have been December, 2011, concurrent with your 1st Semester College grades to be included in your application packet. It needed to be the case that you would have 29 or fewer college credits at the time you enter NROTC in the Fall of 2012 (basically only take 29 units during your freshman year of college).

    The problem is that you are applying for Fall, 2013, at which time you will have much more than 29 college credits... that isn't permitted in the NROTC High School Scholarship applicaiton... I don't think.

    On the other hand, what do I know? Only what I read here.

    I think that would leave you with trying to join NROTC as a college programmer, without scholarship. Or, as you say, just complete college and then apply to OCS. To your question about whether the NROTC units would take you as a college Junior Transfer, I don't know. There was a thread on here about three months ago about a JC transfer to a 4 Yr. University... and as I recall it is really, really rare for a JC transfer into a 4 yr. university to be accepted as a Jr. into any ROTC program... Navy, Army, or Air Force. You will have missed two entire years of Class and Lab. I think it is possible as a College sophomore to walk into the ROTC office, and ask to go to the summer training between sophomore and Jr. years of college, and qualify to go to Advanced Course (what all ROTC programs call Years 3 and 4 of the training).
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2012
  4. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    First, Dunninla is right about the 30 credit hours making you ineligible for the NROTC 4 year scholarship.

    I know NROTC offers 2 year scholarships. You can find stuff on the web like this:
    People who are accepted into the two year program attend a 6.5 week program over the summer to basically catch up on the Naval Science portions of their courses.

    I have looked everywhere for an application but cannot find one. What I did find was that applicants should contact the Professor of Naval Science at the school they plan to enroll in. I expect the application is more like the application that a NROTC College Programmer would use which is quite different for the online 4 year High School Scholarship.

    I don't mean to be a downer but I suppose there is a possibility that the scholarship no longer exists and its why I can't find applications etc. on it. But you should pursue it with a PNS somewhere as its still mentioned on the regular NROTC site, right where they tell you you're ineligible for the 4 year program.

    Also, I don't think you can enter the College Program, as by that point you must have been accepted for what the Navy calls Advanced Standing. I know for the College Programmers, if they don't get an in-school (called sideload) scholarship then that application is used to determine if they will get Advanced Standing. This is another reason I think the application process is similar to that for College Programmers and why you have to go through a PNS.

    Good Luck. I hope things work out for you. :thumb:
     
  5. NavyBound

    NavyBound Member

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    I followed the rules, I'm perfectly eligible. I think it's up to each specific unit:/

    http://www.navy.com/jobs/nrotc.html

    THIS WAS STRAIGHT FROM THE NAVY WEBSITE.

    About this Scholarship: The Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps (NROTC) scholarship provides money for school and a career as a Navy Officer once that schooling is complete. As a student, get:

    Up to $180,000 for tuition at any one of more than 160 top colleges and universities
    Funding for textbooks, lab fees and even spending money
    Besides time to focus on academic performance and get the most from college life, enjoy the opportunity to gain valuable leadership experience by:

    Taking a Naval Science course each semester
    Participating in Navy drills at least once a week
    Wearing your Navy uniform (provided at no cost to you) once a week
    Participating in community service projects
    NROTC students also have the chance to spend a portion of their summers shadowing Navy Officers in the field, in a variety of capacities, including:

    Nuclear Power – assigned to nuclear submarine or nuclear surface vessels
    Afloat Aviation – assigned to train aboard a carrier, including flight time if feasible
    Ashore Aviation – assigned to train with a Navy aviation squadron, including flight time if feasible
    Foreign Exchange – assigned to train with navies of other countries
    Medicine – assigned to train at a hospital or a hospital afloat
    About this Job: Upon graduation, NROTC students have a job waiting. Work with top professionals from around the country. And look forward to world travel, immediate leadership responsibilities and hands-on training in any one of several impressive career paths, including:

    Surface Warfare
    Naval Aviator (Pilot or Flight Officer)
    Submarine Officer
    Explosive Ordnance Disposal Officer
    Special Warfare Officer (SEAL)
    Special Warfare Officer (SWCC)
    Nurse Corps Officer
    Key Opportunities: NROTC students have a variety of advantages over civilian peers, including:

    Freedom to concentrate on college studies/nursing school
    The ability not to have to work through school
    A choice of top colleges and universities
    The prospect of moving directly from college to a skilled profession
    And as a Navy Officer:

    Pursue opportunities not readily available in the civilian world
    Work in exciting locations across the U.S. or around the globe
    Receive paid training and access to Navy-funded continuing education
    Distinguish yourself with pride and respect as a Navy Officer

    Qualifications and Requirements: Besides a willingness to bear arms to support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign or domestic, candidates must satisfy specific criteria to be eligible for NROTC consideration:

    U.S. citizenship: Required
    Gender: Male or female
    Education: high school graduation or equivalency certificate
    Age: 17 to 23 at enrollment; under age 27 by graduation/commission
    Physical exam: Required
    College credit upon application: No more than 30 semester/45 quarter hours
    Service commitment: Minimum of five years (four years for nurses)
    Learn more about the NROTC program in America's Navy – including details on current offers, available careers and the application process.
     
  6. NavyBound

    NavyBound Member

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    Above it says that UPON application I cannot have 30 or more college credits. When I applied I had 17. As it stands today, I have 33, and by Spring I'll have 67.

    I mean what did they expect me to do, put my life on hold? I kept going to school and I kept studying, I'm not gonna wait around for a scholarship I may not even get.
     
  7. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    So does this mean you're going to give up, take your ball, and go home?

    Get with it. Two year transfers are not that uncommon, I'm sure. You cannot be the first person to get an associate degree and then transfer to a four year college and want to do NROTC. Contact a PNS or one of the other cadre at the schools your interested in going to. Discuss all options with them that are available to you. They should know what they are. :thumb:
     
  8. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I think you have your answer NavyBound, you said I am not going to sit around and wait. It is your choice, personally, I would investigate the ability to transfer all of those credits

    The fact is everyone associated with every branch jokes about the fact that it is a HURRY UP AND WAIT life.

    I am curious how at 17 you had 30 credit hours and by 18 you will have 67. Are you home-schooled or did you do jump start?

    One thing to understand is colleges traditionally will require the last 60 credits to be earned at their college. They also typically have certain classes that must be taken at their school, and those classes are held 1x a yr., and on top of it the pre-req is also held 1x a yr. Every kid I know has had this issue, as much as they thought they would grad early, they couldn't because of academic requirements, thus many get dual majors to maintain their full time status. It happened with both of my kids at different universities with different majors, it happened to all of my friends kids. It is very prevalent in the nursing field and teaching fields too. My kids entered with a high number of credits, not an AA, but def. soph., by the time they were done meeting with their academic advisor, half of those credits didn't not meet the standards for their major according to their curriculum, thus, they were used as electives.

    I would contact the colleges and find out exactly how many credits will transfer to your major before you assume you will graduate in 2 yrs.

    In VA there is an exception for IS students attending CC. They take all of the credits, but again, it doesn't mean that you won't have the problem with pre-reqs needed to be taken at the state university.

    College is a business and they want to make money, this is just one way they do it. Most kids these days graduate with 150+ as non-tech majors. Our DS because he went AFROTC scholarship graduated with a dual major, a minor and a core concentration because to maintain his scholarship he needed to take at least 12 credits, and needed to be a POC for 2 yrs. His last 3 semesters were 12 credits. If you ask him if it was worth it to slow down his pace so he could commission his answer would be a resounding YES. After this week when the AF OTS rated board results were released he would say HECK YES! Not one of his friends that decided to do OTS and not ROTC got pilot. At his det. not only did they have 100% pilot selection for his class of 12, but also class of 13 also got the same %. OTS because the AFA and AFROTC had already handed out all of those slots for 12 and 13 had really only CSO left.

    Just for something else for you to think about.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2012
  9. Non Ducor Duco

    Non Ducor Duco I am not led, I lead

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    Navy Bound have you already graduated high school or are you a high school student just taking alot of college classes because those are two very different things. Idk if it's the same for NROTC, but for AFROTC it says that you cannot be a full time college student if you are going to apply for a hs scholarship. I was concerned because my senior year of hs I was a full time college student because I didn't take any classes at my hs but my scholarship technitian said that it was ok because really the big thing was that you couldn't have GRADUATED from hs yet. Since I hadn't, I was good to go. I know that NROTC allows hs graduates to apply for a 4 yr scholarship against hs students as long as they haven't surpassed 30 college credits. Perhaps that limit does not matter if you have not yet graduated from hs like it is for AFROTC. So a hs senior with 30+ college credits by the time they graduate could apply while a hs graduate with 30+ college credits would be ineligible to compete.

    However, I am confused as to how you could possibly have completed your NROTC scholarship application in March of this year when the applications open up in June or July of the year before. So the scholarship application for fall 2012 college entrance begun Summer 2011 and the scholarship boards ran until April 2012...At least that was the impression I got from this forum these past couple months when the board would light up periodically whenever scholarship notifications went out. I know that's how it is for AFROTC, I am relatively sure it is that way for AROTC, and I thought it was the same for NROTC. So instead of March being super early to apply for a scholarship, it would be supper late and not within the time frame for either a fall 2012 or a fall 2013 scholarship. So is NROTC different than the other ROTCs in that the application for 2013 scholarships opens up in March when the scholarship boards for the 2012 scholarships are still going on???
     
  10. basilrathbone

    basilrathbone Member

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    For our kids the NROTC application opened up @ April 1 and closed on January 31. They must have opened it in March this year for him to have started an application. Between February and the opening of the new scholarship application year, there was no option for starting an application.

    None of my kids had more than a few CC credits so I don't know the answer to his question. I agree with kinnem that he should contact the NROTC Units of the schools he is applying to. They'll have the answers he is looking for both for the schools and NROTC. I assume that his application has been long submitted so he is just in a waiting game for the results. He just needs to understand his options at the schools in case he does get the scholarship and make plans for other alternatives in case he doesn't get the scholarship, it seems to me.
     
  11. NavyBound

    NavyBound Member

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    Haha I think I worded things weird. Okay here it is: I graduated class of 2011. Started college August 2011. In Feb of 2012 decided to go or the scholarship since at the time I had 17 credits. After April 1st, my spring semester credits would come to be 33. And of course I would no loner be eligible to even apply. So I turned my application in exactly at midnight on the last day of march, so that it was in before the college would put those credits on my transcript. Anyway, it is now Fall semester, and by the end of this upcoming spring semester I will end up having around 67 credits.

    Hope I cleared things up. (I'm 19 yrs old btw)
     
  12. Non Ducor Duco

    Non Ducor Duco I am not led, I lead

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    So, to clarify, the online, not the paper version, NROTC scholarship application was open in March and you submitted it by the end of that month? And afterwards, your online portal changed to reflect that your application had been submitted and asked that you schedule an interview? If the requirement is that you couldn't have more than 30 credits at the time of application: meaning the moment that you submitted the online application and not the moment you completed your package (which would include the submission of your interview scores and possibly the arrival of your transcript and test scores if they had a delayed arrival time) since that would most likely not have been completed until after March; then I don't see why your application would be invalid. You would, however, have to prove that you will graduate in the given time frame of the scholarship offer. From what I've been told, those of us on scholarship with alot of college credits, at least in AFROTC, cannot just finish our bachelor's degrees early and then use the remaining time left on the scholarship to knock out credits for a Master's degree. For example, the institution I go to recognizes that I have knocked out 30 credits required by my degree. I am not allowed to put forth an academic plan that would have me completing my B.S degree in 3 years and then using the remaining year on the scholarship to knock out part of my M.S. Degree. What they're telling us to do is to stretch out our remaining academic requirements for our B.S so that it will cover the full 4 years. I am actually in a ROTC approved program that extends 5 years and will end in me having a double major so I don't need to stretch out my credits that much and may even need a scholarship extension. I believe non-scholarship cadets can work on a masters while in the program, but I would look into NROTC's policy on using 4 yr scholarships to complete a B.S as well as a M.S.. Because AFROTC scholarship policy, as it has been explained to us, is that you cannot use it to pay for a M.S and you cannot graduate early, you must either go the full 4 years or, depending on your major, you may be granted a scholarship extension to include a 5th year.

    You do seem to be in a unique situation. Have you talked to your scholarship technician at NROTC HQ? I know on the AFROTC website, there is a number you can call to ask for answers to questions like this. Your scholarship technician is based on your last name and they will be able to view all the information NROTC HQ has on you(i.e what has been received, which board your scholarship package will up against, etc). They should be able to help you. If they they cannot answer your questions with confidence, they have access to ppl who can and can give you a call or shoot you an email back with a definitive answer. My technician was exceptionally helpful and always answered my questions either that day or the next day after he talked with someone more knowledgeable on the subject.
     
  13. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    In the end of the day you need to decide if you want to serve in the military even if you have to put your life on hold, or you want to move forward with your life without the military.

    I am going to be honest, this isn't an easy life. You will not have any guarantee you will get your career field. You won't even have a guarantee you will be commissioned.

    If you believe that a scholarship is an easy way to pay for college, I suggest you look at this thread.
    http://www.serviceacademyforums.com/showthread.php?t=27658

    If you think that you can walk in 4 yrs, I suggest you talk to the command and ask them how many of their peers walked at that 4 yr marker. I am betting not a lot.

    These are things to really think about, long and hard.

    You need to ask are you willing to serve for the next decade if it means they pay 2 yrs of your college?

    Have you investigated the time owed for your career field?
     
  14. NavyBound

    NavyBound Member

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    Pima,

    I'm ABSOLUTELY AND POSITIVELY sure this is what I want to do. Ive wanted to do this since high school, but my mother made some poor choices, and i was forced to work at an early age - leaving no time for ROTC. When i realized i could still do it as a freshman in college i took the chance with no hesitaion When I said I wasn't going to put my life on hold I meant that I wasn't going to to attending school to wait on a scholarship I may not get. And if I don't that's fine, I can still apply for OCS! This is a dream of mine and this scholarship would make it happen in the best way possible - since college is definitely not cheap. What honestly upsets me is that my NROTC recruiters were not helpful AT ALL!! After I did my interview, they sent off my package and everything seems to be going smoothly - however, I have called and sent countless emails about my transferring situation and they never want to get back to me. And WHEN they do, it's usually a sentence long reply telling me to look on the website. It's TOTAL NEGLECT! But one thing I DO have is an email from someone in the higher ups of the NROTC board telling me I'm perfectly eligible for a 4 year scholarship since I applied on time and my credits after that date will not count against me. But like i said, scholarship or not, my main concern is wether these colleges will have a problem with it or not. I guess we will just have to wait and see. But I'm glad I have that email for proof in case these people go back on their word.
     
  15. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    The colleges won't care. Nor will the NROTC units at those colleges.
     
  16. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    NavyBound,

    You've talked a lot about the lack of help you have received from recruiters. Have you sat down and talked in person with the Cadre at the NROTC Unit at the school you wish to transfer to, these are going to be the only people that will be able to tell you your options. From what you have posted you may have enough credits to transfer as a junior. To participate in NROTC you will need to apply for and go to the NROTC summer program to catch up so you can start NROTC as a junior. Personally I think this will be tough considering not all the NROTC Mids that have been enrolled in NROTC for their freshman and sophomore years are getting Advanced Standing slots.

    You may have paperwork that shows you applied before the max credits allowed but now you are looking to get a scholarship that is 2 years and that could be tough.

    The only way you are going to get the answers to your specific situation is to talk directly with the NROTC unit and see what options you have.
     
  17. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    +1. As I've repeatedly said. I think this is true whether you're eligible to apply for the four year or two year scholarship. You're situation is unique enough that you need to have the cadre in the boat so you can be sure all your I's are dotted ad T's crossed.
     
  18. MechEngi2B

    MechEngi2B Member

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    Just make the applications to all services. You simply get what you want or not. BFD either way.

    Pima is right, make sure you know what your getting into. Surface, sub, aviation ... a lot pro's and con's there. Do your due diligence, make out your application and let the chips ride.

    If you want to go to sea, or get a Naval Reserve or Coast Guard commission, you can go to a state maritime academy. You can get $32K automatically (Stategic Sealift Officer). Oh, and state maritime academies are inexpensive.

    Some guys in the Sealift Officer Program get active Navy. One guy got a flight navigator slot. You can also apply for NUPOC with 30 months left until graduation. The Navy officers at my academy really go to bat for you.
     
  19. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Navy,

    As far as them going back on their word, all they stated were you are eligible. Not everyone who applies will get a scholarship. They are the minority.

    I agree with Jcleppe, talk to the cadre. The fact is they can help you more than any of us here. They have a direct line with NROTC HQ, they can pull up the regs and pinpoint exactly where you need to go from there.

    My position is many people have an illusion in their mind what the military life is like, and many times when reality doesn't meet their illusion they become frustrated. You state you want to serve, and I believe you, but in what career field? What if you don't get that field?

    As an example:

    A friend's DS decided to do the OTS path over AFROTC. He applied for rated, and wanted to be a pilot. He didn't take the time to realize they could offer him a rated position such as a CSO. Board met and he got CSO. He can't go back and try for the next board. It is a take it or leave it. He is not sure that he is willing to be a CSO.

    That happens often. Candidates don't take the time to realize they might not get their dream career field. That is all I was asking. Are you ready to get career plan C, and not A or B?

    That occurs not only for ROTC, but also OTS. Just because they have bases in Hawaii doesn't mean you will be assigned there. Just because you want to fly, doesn't mean they won't make you the Intel officer.

    That is all I am saying. Take the time, talk to people about the pros and cons of the lifestyle. The pros and cons of ROTC over OTS or vise a verse. The more you learn, the more the illusion will look like reality.
     

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