2017 recruited lacrosse player questions

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by tish@campustrips.net, Oct 3, 2012.

  1. tish@campustrips.net

    tish@campustrips.net New Member

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    Understand the policies regarding recruited athletes to DI and NCAA rules. Cannot find any info. on what might be different for a recruited lacrosse player who has been given a verbal agreement in June of junior year and verbally committed prior to senior year after July 1. Coach already okayed the SAT scores and GPA. In reading the forums, became a little nervous of the posts of committed athletes who had problems/issues in their senior year and did not get in. We do not have a backup or plan B plan, as thought the word of a West Point Coach is as good as it gets. Any thoughts, wisdom from parents, players who have gone this route are appreciated. If this is the wrong thread, I apologize but cannot find a thread for recruited athletes. Is the time line the same for other applicants. We read a list of recruited athletes and they did not list their appointment date, but just listed "recruited athlete" as if they did not get an appointment letter.
     
  2. mom3boys

    mom3boys Parent

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    Where are you in the application process? A recruited athlete must still be qualified academically, physically, and medically. Some coaches ask you to try to get your own nomination, others do not. Have you applied to all your nominating sources? What does your admissions portal reflect? Have you received an LOA or an LOE at this point? These questions would help the posters on the forum help you figure out where you are in the process. :smile:
     
  3. GoArmyBeatNavy

    GoArmyBeatNavy Member

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    Develop a plan B. Until you have the appointment in hand, nothing is certain. Coaches are basing their "verbal commitments" off "projected" number of slots that their teams will have during the admissions process (especially a verbal commitment in June/July).

    Also, during the application process, their are a lot of steps that can trip you up as m3b said. I recommend that you contact the recruited athlete admissions officer for a status on your application.

    Good luck:thumb:
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2012
  4. jbrowerdallas

    jbrowerdallas Dallas Mom

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    The IMPORANTANCE of a Plan B

    First let me say, we have no experience as a recruited athlete. With that said, my DS was appointed to WP for the class of 2016 on December 2, 2011. On December 17, 2011, 2 weeks after receiving the big fat leather appointment, he dislocated his shoulder and was instantly medically DQ'd. His waiver was NOT approved. He was one of the first in his graduating class to know where he was going to college and could have easily stopped the application process at all of his back-up schools but he didn't. You must ALWAYS have a Plan B! Nothing is certain, nothing is guaranteed. Murphy's Law plays at the SAs too. Anything that could go wrong will if you aren't prepared with a Plan B.
     
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    +1 to jbrower's post.

    The fact is a lot can happen before next summer, and even once they are there in those few weeks.

    This forum is littered with posters that had they not had a Plan B in place, there would be problems for them or their child next fall.

    For example:
    1 parent of an AFA cadet became gravely ill at BCT within days of arrival. The AFA determined she would not be able to complete BCT, thus she was a medical turnback for this yr.

    A parent on this forum 2 yrs ago had their child twist their knee getting off the bus...turned back that day. Turned back again the following yr.

    LAX is a spring sport. The running joke on this site when the poster gets their BFE, is Congrats, now get out the bubble wrap! He doesn't have that option since it is a spring sport and he is a recruited athlete. What if his last game is May 15th and gets injured, will he medically Q'd for 6 weeks later? If not, than what will he do? Will he go to CC because he had no plan B in place? What if the injury is similar to jbrower's child regarding waivers?

    It is only Oct 3rd, most colleges don't have their ED/EA submission dates for another month. I would get a plan B in place for the JIC.
     
  6. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    That's sure as you are going to get. I actually talked to Coach A about a lacorsse recurit that was committed to another school. He seems like very honorable coach.

    LOA is the next level beyond the verbal agreement. If you know other lacrosse players being recruited by other colleges, talk to them about what they received, in terms of accpetance/scholarship offers in writing.

    You still have to complete the application like anyone else. Your coach will not, cannot, and should not do it for you. So, if you do what you are supposed to do, to include applying for other nominations, the coach can keep his promise. If you are not academically qualifed, you will end of going to the prep school.

    So if you are going to complete your application and medically qualified, you should end up at West Point.

    As for the back up plan, how much do you trust the Army coach?
     
  7. pointguard

    pointguard Member

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    My DS

    Dislocated his shoulder this past August of his 11th grade year.
    Are you saying JBDallas that he might as well forget his, and the
    Coaches, SA dreams already? Does it not help he's in 11th, or
    is it 'ever' a dislocation, if you and or anyone knows this?
    Thank you.
     
  8. Rebel91

    Rebel91 Member

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    Evidence suggests there is not a "one size fits all" policy regarding medical waivers. A shoulder dislocation may be different for each individual. The files and Doctor or Surgeon reports will be reviewed by DODMERB, but the wavier granted or denied by the Superintendant.

    Moreover, many recruited athletes have serious injuries/surgeries and then recover fully and perform in their chosen sport. So a dislocated shoulder of a blue chip recruit who recovers and still performs to the satisfaction of the particular coach is more likely to get a waiver than a candidate who is not recruited and won't contribute to a particular varsity team at USMA, USNA, USAFA.

    Fair? Perhaps not, but this is a reality.
     
  9. jbrowerdallas

    jbrowerdallas Dallas Mom

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    The dislocation itself is an automatic DQ through DoDMERB. The Medical Code is: D225.00 History of any dislocation, subluxation, or instability of the shoulder. He will ALWAYS be DQ'd because of the injury - regardless of his recovery.

    DoDMERB DQs; SA's issue the waivers. In my son's case, his surgery to repair the injury was in January. He only had 6 months to recover before he would have reported for R-Day. The WP waiver review authority didn't feel that this was enough time to fully recover and participate fully during Beast. He was told that they see no reason that he wouldn't fully recover and be ready for the class of 2017. We are currenly in the waiver process again for this year. We remain hopeful that they will grant the waiver this time but are prepared to continue with his Plan B if it doesn't work out again. He's currently at Texas A&M in the Corps of Cadets and was awarded an AROTC scholarship for which his waiver WAS approved.

    So, long story short: it is possible to get the waiver if all the stars line up for your DS and the SA. However, don't assume that a waiver is an easy thing to get. There are LOTS of reasons why WP wouldn't approve the waiver - most of them you'll never know...
     
  10. SonNo2of4

    SonNo2of4 Member

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    What I would do..

    I would complete my file as soon as possible. There can be hang ups at many points along the way (the physical itself). Those things you have control over and can find out sooner than later. If the athlete is a strong candidate, the coach can secure an LOA for the athlete. My son's coach proceeded quickly with that, since signing season for the college recruits at the Universities are going to happen soon and offers are being made. Even with a LOA, it is always good to have a plan B, as many have said. Sometimes physical issues keep one from being able to be admitted. My son is in one of those sports where injuries (fractures/torn ACL's etc.) are very common. I have heard some say you need to wrap them in bubble wrap until they get to basic.
     

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