70 years ago

Discussion in 'Academy/Military News' started by bruno, Aug 8, 2012.

  1. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    Yesterday was the 70th Anniversary of the start of the Guadalcanal campaign. For those who have never read about, or talked to anyone who served on Guadalcanal, it was really a unique campaign- it was a cobbled together operation in which the 1st Marine Division were told only at the last minute that they were making a combat assault. There was little training, really old individual equipment and communications gear The ships were not even combat loaded, the Amphibious and Carrier task forces were under different leadership with different objectives and the overall commander was not up to the job. The result was that the campaign stretched on far longer than it should have with the Marines only a notch above starvation at some points as the transports and supply ships left before they were unloaded, and control of the air and sea was contested for most of the campaign- the Navy suffering huge losses in several surface gun battles (more sailors were killed than Marines and Soldiers were killed ashore). Nontheless- the Marines demonstrated incredible perseverance and tenacity and with the help of the later arriving 25th Infantry Division eventually managed to secure the island. It was a tough campaign that deserves to be remembered still.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2012
  2. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Also where SM1 Douglas Munro, USCG, rescued strainded Marines and was killed in the process. He was later awarded the Medal of Honor.
     
  3. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    Last edited: Aug 9, 2012
  4. falconfamily

    falconfamily Member

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    The Japanese were adept at night battles and the American fleet was caught by surprise. I cannot imagine what those surface battles must have looked like to the Marines and Sailors on shore. To then wake up in the morning with the fleet gone and occupying a small barely habitable island in the far reaches of the pacific.
     
  5. Bullet

    Bullet Member

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    Kind of explains the USMC's desire over the past 70 years to "make sure we can do it on our own." Thus the Navy's Army's push to get its own Navy and Air Force.

    Ask a Marine why they need LDHDs and their own fighters, and they simply say a one word answer: "Guadalcanal" Usually followed up with: "Never again"
     
  6. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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  7. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    Wow: To be able to talk to "A China Marine" You must be very proud:thumb: Those that do never tell or brag you have to ask. And then they will not tell you the truth.:thumb:
     
  8. AJM7680

    AJM7680 Banned

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    The USMC had to come quickly to the understanding that it was easier to replace a Marine than an aircraft carrier. The US Navy only had a total of four carriers and completion of any additional ones was over a year away. It was generally believed that carriers were the only thing that could prevent the Japanese from successfully launching an invasion of the west coast of the United States. There were three of these carriers at Guadacanal on August 7. Intelligence is not what it is today. There were a lot of indications that Japanese carriers were nearby. Short range carrier aircraft, that unbeknownst to the US, were ditching immediately immediately after their missions added to the uncertainty. Air wing fighter aircraft suffered heavy losses. Admiral Fletcher decided that it was more important to protect the carriers and the best place for them to be was at sea. Much of the criticism for his actions was from the "battleship" Navy which was critical of all carrier operations. This, combined with hindsight being 20/20, is responsible for much of the overall opinions of probably the most critical successful operation of WWII.
     
  9. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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  10. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    Sitting around the Instructors Lounge one day we were putting pins in a map of SEA indicating where we had been stationed. MSGT started putting pins in the middle of China?? I asked him when that happened? Oh! I left the farm in the 30's because we couldn't support ten kids on the farm and went to work for Claire Chennault and the Flying Tigers as a mechanic. They never tell you and they are certainly the Greatest Generation.
     
  11. NorwichDad

    NorwichDad Member

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    They certainly are the greatest generation. Though these kids in the services of the last 11 years should be a close second!!

    Though now I look at a tin-type photo about 150 years old on my mantle of a New Jersey Cavalry sergeant, who really looks like my sons, who would make an argument for his generation. Stunning how we look like our ancestors.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2012
  12. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    From 1754 through 2012 it is a toss-up as each generation seems to have their moment. 1861 through 1865 could give anyone a run for the money:thumb:
     
  13. falconfamily

    falconfamily Member

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    The Japanese were brutal during WWII. After Chinese soldiers and civilians gave shelter to Doolittle's raiders, it is believed that the Japanese military killed around 250,000 people searching for Doolittle's raiders. It is one of the many episodes that haunt the modern nation of China today and provides some insight as to their actions on the world stage.
     

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