9/11/09 Eight Years After

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Capt MJ, Sep 11, 2009.

  1. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    Spare a thought today for those who still grieve for loved ones lost on 9/11/01. Fortunate enough to have escaped the explosion and subsequent fires in the Pentagon, I remember again today lost shipmates, colleagues, and those I didn't know from all the 9/11 sites.

    I do remember -vividly - how the military family pulled together to rally the OPNAV staff, get us on a wartime operational footing, take care of the families of the dead and injured and to carry on the business of national defense. I don't remember much of that day and the days-nights that ran into each other that followed, but here are some memories, among so many, that stand out:

    - A Navy seaman, riding around in a commandeered golf cart, helping the wounded get to the triage site and being everywhere at once. He was later invited to sit with Mrs. Bush during the President's address to Congress. Though there were many heroes that day on the Navy staff, many senior officers, it was a unanimous decision to pick that young seaman to go to represent the Navy.
    - A Navy LDO (Limited Duty Officer), convincing firefighters to escort him back into the building, so he could get the notebook with all the trained CACOs (Casualty Assistance Calls Officers) for the staff, because he knew we would need every one.
    - The uniformed and civilian staff streaming down the hill from the Navy Annex to help.
    - The military dentists working alongside doctors and other health providers from the Pentagon Clinic doing triage at Ground Zero (Pentagon Center courtyard) and elsewhere at the collision site.
    - People covered from head-to-toe in white limestone dust, wandering dazed.
    - Chaplains materializing from nowhere, comforting and helping.
    - People going into the burning building again and again to lead people out of the smoke-filled corridors, before fire-fighting staff got there. Can't say enough about the wonderful emergency responders.
    - A Navy flag officer, later that night at the Navy Annex up the hill, walking around busy cubicles with Circuit City bags of blackberry chargers, phone chargers and batteries, doling them out to everyone who had dropped everything to get out.
    -The stab of shock, every time we learned another name of someone who didn't make it out. The lift of joy, when we ran into someone who did, and who we knew worked in the worst areas affected.
    - The sheer relief in my husband's voice, hours after the attack, when I could finally get through to him.

    If you haven't been to the Pentagon Memorial, I recommend it. It's designed for quiet reflection. Lots of symbolism, for example, the benches, one for each life lost, face either toward or toward the Pentagon, depending on whether the person was in the Pentagon or on the plane.
    http://www.whs.mil/memorial/
     
  2. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    It's a day that influenced most of us, even if indirectly.
    I was in 8th grade, at the time. It definitely played a part in my joining.

    RIP, and a prayer for the families.
     
  3. adrummer71

    adrummer71 2LT

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    Sept. 11 is what inspired me to join the Army, I was in fifth grade at the time. So I swore in yesterday at our college's football game at half time. It was a great experience!
     
  4. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    I appreciate the comments. Good can come out of bad things - thank you, adrummer71 and raimius, for choosing to serve. And tpg, as always, I know you in particular appreciate the "little things" that stay in mind.
     
  5. MaritimeGirl11

    MaritimeGirl11 Member

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    9-11-01 May we always remember and never forget the brave men and women. (My dad went down the day after to help out with the fire fighters and search dogs) God bless the USA!


    Today marks the eight-year anniversary of an unparalleled tragedy in our Nation’s history. On September 11, 2001, thousands of people—men, women, and children of all backgrounds and faiths—perished in the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, and in a field in Pennsylvania. In the midst of great tragedy, we saw tremendous bravery and sacrifice reflected in the many first responders who gave their own lives to save others and in heroic passengers on the hijacked flights.

    9/11 remains a defining moment for many of us and for our Nation. Out of the tragic events of that day grew our resolve to protect our homeland against further terrorist attacks. On this day, the fifth anniversary of 9/11, we remember those who perished in those terrible incidents. We go forward in their memory, determined never to relent in serving American citizens by securing our homeland.

    Where were you and what were you doing on that tragic morning...
    I remember like it was yesterday.

    I was in art class and the bell rang so I was off to science. When I got in the room I sat down , chatted with some friends. then my science teacher stepped into the room. I looked at him and he did not look happy. Then he said"may I have every ones attention please" Then we heard what had happened. I swear every one in that room, their face expressions went from happy to sad, worried, and afraid. I can only imagine what was going through every ones mind at that very moment. family and friends. what was going through my mind? My dad. He's a fire fighter. Then the Principal came on and expained in greater detail what had happened that morning. When I got home my parents explained to me what had happended and every single station on TV had the tragic on, even MTV. That night my mom told me that my dad was going to go to ground zero the next day to help out with the releif.He was with the dog search team. I can't even begin to imagine all the dead bodies he saw the next day.All I did that night was cry. I cryed myself to sleep.
    The next day I heard him get up early to go to NYC/ ground zero to help. I looked from my bedroom window, whispered a little prayer and said good bye. That day at school every one was in Red, white, and blue. I couldn't believe how my nationalism and patriotism was in my school, community, America, and even around the globe.It was a time of sorrow, it was a time of a new coming, and it was a time to reflect on what America was really all about.
    A few weeks later my dad had all the kids at the middle school write letters to the NYC Fire Fighters. One of the kids had a father that died in the twin towers.A few weeks passes and my dad, mom, and I went to the NYC fire dept. and presented them with the letters that all the kids write, a poster, and happyness. I felt very proud of what I had done to help my country during this tragic time.It made me realize the importance of America what it stood for and what the future would hold.

    *God Bless you and God Bless America!
     

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