A nice story

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by NorwichDad, Jul 15, 2014.

  1. NorwichDad

    NorwichDad Member

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    I recently bumped into the daughter of our neighbor Rudy Pinto who passed away a couple of years ago. I used to speak of him on this forum often. Rudy had served in the Marines in World War Two. When my son started to talk of wanting to serve our country I had him speak with Rudy. Rudy had always tried to give him advice and talked to him about doing the right things. As my son went to various Army schools he always would send Rudy postcards. Rudy would walk around the neighborhood proudly showing them to everyone.
    At Okinawa in June 1945 a mortar put him in the hospital. When he returned to his group he found that his closest buddies did not survive the battle. He was sent with his group to Nagasaki in September 1945 after the Japanese surrender. It was a horrible desolate place he said. The atomic bomb had completely destroyed part of the city. All of Japan was facing starvation then. Rudy saw two Marines teasing a young Japanese teenager, Yoshio Yoshitomi. He went over and helped the boy. Rudy then shared his own food with the boy for the remainder of his time in Nagasaki. When Rudy left to go home, he gave Yoshitomi his home address. They wrote each other often. Rudy said his wife in the 1940s would put a 10 or 20 dollar bill in the letters. A pretty good sum in those days he said. The letters between them were of two old friends catching up on family and life events. The never saw each other again face to face. Rudy always talked about his Japanese friend.
    Rudy's daughter just told me that after his death they got a translater and wrote a letter to Yoshio Yoshitomi explaining that Rudy had died. They got back a letter from his family saying that Yoshitomi had also died around the same time. His family told her that Yoshitomi had also always talked to everyone about Rudy and their friendship. It was decided Rudy's and Yoshitomi's grandson's will now write to each other as their grandfathers had for over 65 years.
     
  2. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    Reading this was a great way to start my day. Thank you.
     
  3. USNA02

    USNA02 Parent

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    Oh wow, what a powerful and beautiful story. Thank you for sharing this.
     
  4. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Thanks NorwichDad. I recall the story of Rudy and Yoshio Yoshitomi, the new news being Yoshitomi-san passed away at about the same time. So sorry to hear this and so ironic. If people can make connections like this then maybe there is still hope for this world.
     
  5. cga82

    cga82 Banned

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    This would make a great book and movie!:thumb:
     
  6. Voyager20

    Voyager20 Member

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    +1 for book and movie.

    However, I must admit...I was expecting something like a marriage or attending same college ....but grandsons writing to each other is sweet as well.
     
  7. nofodad

    nofodad Member

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    nice.
     
  8. payitforward

    payitforward Member

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    Thanks for posting that story, NorwichDad. +1 the movie/book idea.
     
  9. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    I propose "Letters from Nagasaki" as a working title.
     
  10. NorwichDad

    NorwichDad Member

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    DS wrote a story but DS and I think Rudy's grandson wrote the best. Rudy showed it to us. Pretty long including a lot detail of his time in the CCC. My favorite thing with the old folks is getting them talking. Most people have some special experiences in life. My favorite of Rudy's stories is the time in 1926 when the whole town of Iselin NJ searched the farms and fields of this area for two lost boys(Rudy and his brother Tommy) in a driving rainstorm.

    I found and printed the below for Rudy a few years ago. Article is little tough to read with creases but extremely well written. Story is all the way to the right.

    http://archive.woodbridgelibrary.org/Archive/WoodbridgeLeader/1926/1926-07-30/pg_0001.pdf
     
  11. fencersmother

    fencersmother Founding Member

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    Norwich, this story could almost restore my hope for future peace in the world!

    I really appreciate your sharing this!

    And definitely, I would pay to see that movie.
     
  12. jessiereal24

    jessiereal24 New Member

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    Interesting story! Thanks :)
     
  13. NorwichDad

    NorwichDad Member

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    I recently found a copy of 2007 Christmas letter from Yoshio Yoshitomi to Rudy that Rudy gave my son 5 years ago. I will post it up later tonight. If I can figure how to.
     
  14. NorwichDad

    NorwichDad Member

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    Christmas 2007 Letter. FYI, Olive was Rudy's wife who died two years before this letter.
     
  15. matty

    matty Member

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    What an amazing story. Thanks for sharing.

    Being Korean, my parents and grandparents are overtly indifferent to Japanese people (they don't hate, but if they were to pick a zombie apocalypse survival buddy he/she would not be Japanese. I think it's just a lasting repercussion of the Second World War with the Japanese occupation of Korea (a lot of bad stuff).

    Having grown up in America I've been given the opportunity to make the decision for myself that race doesn't define character. At all.

    It just makes me sad that my elder relatives won't truly appreciate the beauty of something like this -- moreover that they won't come to realize that not all Japanese people share the same beliefs, as well as Germans, and even Koreans.

    I've talked to them a lot but to no avail -- I guess its just the firsthand experience of Axis occupation that skewed and hardened their beliefs.

    Sorry if that was super depressing but it's one of the few debates that I constantly have with my relatives, and I consider it to be a big deal. :redface:
     
  16. cga82

    cga82 Banned

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    Very Nice! What a great piece of history.
     
  17. NorwichDad

    NorwichDad Member

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    I would imagine your relatives lived through some tough times under the Japanese. It is tough to forgive. I would not argue, let them roll as they are. You just never know what people have lived thru.

    As for Rudy I came to understand that the friendship was his own therapy of the unbelievable trauma he endured in the Second World War. There are two types of people . Givers and takers. Takers are not always poor. US Service Members for the most part are givers. Unfortunately some give everything. Rudy had been through the battles and then sent to the Atomic Hell of Nagasaki. He was a giver. He helped this boy who had lost people. It gave him meaning and substance to his time in Nagasaki and afterward. He also talked about helping his brother Tommy for many years after the war. Tommy never lost all the deamons he gained in the Battle of The Bulge. He also spoke of helping another veteran who had lost his legs in the War. Rudy as a plumber moved the sinks in the man's house close to the floor so this man would not need to get up on a chair to use them. A lot of Service Men and Women suffered and still suffer from their wartime experiences. Maybe getting out there and helping others is good therapy for them as it was for Rudy.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2014

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