ACT score for ROTC scholarship

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Nick0726, Apr 10, 2013.

  1. Nick0726

    Nick0726 Member

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    I'm taking the ACT Saturday, and applying for the AROTC scholarship as soon as I get my scores back. What's a good goal to shoot for on the test?

    I've been taking several practice tests and right now I'm averaging around a 29. Is this good enough for a scholarship?

    How much does the ACT score play into the scholarship process? Is it worth a certain amount of points compared to the interview, etc?
     
  2. bdoyle214

    bdoyle214 New Member

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    I would say shoot for around what you are getting (29-30) It really depends on what school you are trying to get one at too. I only got a 25 overall and an 1800 SAT and I got a 4yr scholarship. If you are well rounded you should be ok with a 29
     
  3. ahuntedyeti

    ahuntedyeti Member

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    I believe the SAT/ACT score is one of the most important factors in selection, more so than the interview. A 29 should do you well for ROTC, any of the other branches you might consider taking a class. Good luck!
     
  4. Thompson

    Thompson Member

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    I don't remember the exact number, but 29 is definitely above the national average and is good for a competitive chance at a scholarship. Although no one can say you will/will not get a scholarship based off those scores - chances are good, provided that everything else is in order; I received a 3-year scholarship with a score of 26.

    PS Don't forget to add Cadet Command as one of the recipients of the score ... sometimes if you wait too long, ACT will charge you a fee to send it to them.
     
  5. goaliedad

    goaliedad Parent

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    Having read through a few of your posts, I'm going to start out with some life advice (that will serve you well in military service).

    Spend your time and efforts working on things you can control and let go of things where you don't have control. Try to engage resources (like folks on a forum) in a manner that gives them a sense of pride in helping you (we like to feel important rather than just be fact spouting machines). Believe it or not, these forums are populated by people with a desire to help. Give us a reason to want to try!

    Understanding the process is important, but only to the extent that you can alter your behavior to fit it better. If you are taking the ACT this weekend, there isn't much more you can do besides get a good night sleep on Friday night.

    You did open a thread asking about your competitiveness for VMI. Note that nobody has replied. It isn't personal, but at the same time it is personal. The folks here don't know you, so it is more difficult to answer difficult questions (yours was a difficult question because of the nature of SMCs).

    To the extent that you did not present a "personal" side (you gave a look at your statistical information - something CC looks at of course, but we here on this board talk to people not applications), you don't get much in answers.

    We get lots of "chances" threads (you may or may not have looked extensively at the long list of threads in the ROTC section). Some are anxious because of insecurity. Others are trying to one-up people. Others yet have no idea of what they are jumping into and are truly lost. When you give your statistics only, we have no idea of where you fall in this list (or whether you have other motivations).

    Now I am going to give some general advice based upon all the posts of yours that I've read and answer questions that I think you should be asking...

    It's OK to be insecure about whether you can achieve your goal of commissioning. Lots of things can stop you - many beyond your control - medical conditions, injuries, your past indiscretions (no time machine here) - many still within your control - getting A's on the rest of your tests this semester, writing a good essay on your application, choosing schools where you will be competitive to if not get a scholarship, do well enough to be awarded advanced standing (not all walk-ons make it). If asking advice, ask about what you can do to improve or make good decisions. Provide information about the past (things now beyond your control), that may help others understand give good advice.

    Applying this to some of your posts so far, you might say:

    "I am interested in several of the SMCs because they offer a very structured environment and I have performed well when put in such situations (or perhaps were wondering whether adjusting to the structure is much of a challenge). I have pretty strong statistics, (provide your stats here) but was wondering if there is something different about these SMCs when competing for AROTC scholarships that I am missing?

    Oh, and I am taking the ACT this weekend and my practice tests indicate I am likely to score around 29 if that helps. What do most scholarship recipients at these schools score, so I know if I need to pay even more attention to other plans (i.e. traditional schools and ROTC)?

    If you write these kinds of posts not only will you get the yes/no types of answers but inspire much deeper questioning that may tell you answers to questions you didn't even consider. Open ended questions are good!

    Rambling on a bit here, but I think I've given you something to think about. Not meaning to be harsh, (look at my posting history - I am one of the helpful ones), but at times I get exasperated seeing a series of very narrowly focused informational questions from a new member. I hate to handle these out of context.
     
  6. Thompson

    Thompson Member

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    +2 goaliedad
     
  7. GoBlue1984

    GoBlue1984 Member

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    High as possible, especially Math. I think 36/36 are good scores to shoot for! And don't overlook taking the SAT as you may do better.

    In seriousness, the scores are just one metric. But as stated elsewhere, you need to be well rounded in EC's, leadership, athletics and academics to be the most competitive.

    As budget cuts continue to loom, ROTC (competing nationally against all other applicants) will continue to be a higher bar.
     
  8. blackhawks26

    blackhawks26 Member

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    I got a 27 on my ACT and was awarded a 3 year scholarship. So yes, yours (assuming you get around 29) is definitely competitive.
     
  9. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    Goaliedad gave good advice.

    I would also consider the title you give your post. It will pull in (or put off) members based on how it is phrased.

    In looking at your post again, I see you are asking about a formula for AROTC and what portion ACT plays. I don't have an answer for you - recommend you search the forum or repost based on that question.

    Good luck!
     
  10. Nick0726

    Nick0726 Member

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    Thanks for the help guys. I've been studying pretty hard, even every night over spring break, so I'm hoping hard work really does pay off.

    GoalieDad, thanks for the advice. I wouldn't say I'm necessary insecure about myself, just concerned about getting this scholarship and getting a commission. It's really the only way I can pay for college, so I'm trying to make sure all my bases are covered and control what I can control.
     
  11. QA1517

    QA1517 Member

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    Which is more important to you, serving as an officer or getting your college paid for?

    There are many lower priced public schools thru which you could obtain a commission even without a ROTC scholarship. You would have the chance to further your education once you are commissioned.
     
  12. Nick0726

    Nick0726 Member

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    Serving as an officer and leading US soldiers is the absolute most important thing to me.

    I'm just concerned I won't have the opportunity if I don't receive the scholarship/contract, especially with today's fiscal atmosphere.
     
  13. QA1517

    QA1517 Member

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    I understand, DS was in the same boat.

    A score above a 25 greatly improves your chances, not only for a ROTC scholarship but also for college merit scholarships.

    Don't put all your eggs in one basket, there are many non-ROTC scholarships out there. Do some research and see if there are any that you qualify for. Keep in mind an AROTC scholarship is only towards tuition OR room and board, not both. So you will have to find a way to pay for the remaining amount.

    Best of luck to you. Study hard, you'll make it.
     
  14. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    You only need a 19 to be eligible. Something better than a 19 would be outstanding.
     
  15. Nick0726

    Nick0726 Member

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    Haha, gotta strive to go beyond the minimums Clarkson!
     
  16. Thompson

    Thompson Member

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    Some schools also offer incentives to come to their school by offering some amount of financial aid for ROTC scholarship recipients. I know for ERAU this was the case. The cadre of the ERAU Battalion was able to work out a deal with admissions, specifically for 3-year winners. ERAU will provide $25k in financial aid during freshman year ($30k is tuition fee); and then Cadet Command would pick up the remaining 3 years when the scholarship kicks in. On top of that ERAU was willing to give $5k on R&B during the remaining 3 years as well (R&B is $10k).

    So, when you go school searching, ask about things like this.
     
  17. goaliedad

    goaliedad Parent

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    OK, we are making progress here on understanding the objective. You are trying to combine lemons (your financial situation of needing a scholarship) with sugar (the ROTC scholarship) to make some lemonade (a career in the military). Some people here have plenty of sugar, others not so much.

    Here is where you original question about how your score of 29 isn't really the question to be asking. As you may have noticed others have mentioned that they have gotten scholarships with scores less than 29. So you now know you can get a scholarship with a 29.

    However, this does not say that everyone with a 29 will get a scholarship. Why you may ask? Beyond the rest of the application (which on paper you look good) there is also the pesky issue of what schools you list on your application.

    AROTC Scholarships are granted in limited numbers to various battalions (which may have 1 or many schools). The number of scholarships available to a school primarily are related to their commissioning targets (how many 2nd lieutenants they want in 4 years from X school) and more importantly these days how much the school costs.

    If you read through threads going back in time (I read a full year's worth of threads before I made my first post 4 years ago), you will notice that the awards this year (conveniently there is a popular thread with the data from members here on SAF) tend to be more 3 yr awards for the higher cost privates and OOS publics and more 4 yr awards for in-state publics where Uncle Sam can spend 1/3 to 1/2 as much per year. We also tend to have a more sophisticated than average audience here (note the lack of data about 2nd tier public schools, which also award scholarships - my daughter goes to one and is on a 4-yr campus scholarship).

    Beyond this, for that fixed number of scholarships available to any given campus, there are an unknown scholarship applicants with unknown stats who are also applying. Cadet Command awards scholarships from the top of the list (as the applicants are scored on a formula that nobody here knows exactly) both overall (October awards are very sparse and are centered on very high scorers) and by the school. If you are the top applicant at a school with 1 scholarship, you will likely get it. If you are the 2nd in line, you hope the first guy got in in an earlier board and chose a different school (if they were given a choice - which is not guaranteed).

    So not only do you need a high overall ACT score, but one (when combined with the rest of your application), but you need one that is higher than the other applicants.

    And since I've come on the board, there has been a large reduction in the number of overall scholarships (not to mention more of them being 3-yr). I would say at most schools less than 1/4 of the cadets are on a national scholarship. Others are SMP. Many are walk-ons as freshmen.

    So how do you find out whether you are competitive for a national scholarship at the school(s) you are interested in? You get in contact with the ROO (recruiting operations officer) and in finding out about the unit (have a variety of questions to ask) mention that you are applying for a scholarship and ask what type of GPA/ACT scores this year's recipients had. Many will give you an idea. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns of course, but it is guaranteed not to get any easier.

    By and large, scholarship recipients are in the top quarter of their entering class at any school. So if you choose schools where you are in the top 10% (perhaps apply to an honors program), I'd bet that you are more likely to be the top candidate.

    Taking that back to your 29 ACT. While it may be good nationally, it may not be top quarter at top publics (Berkeley, Michigan, UVA). If your state flagship isn't in the top 25 publics, your 29 may well be in the top quarter.

    SMCs are a different animal all together. You will find that the spread of ACT scores and GPAs are greater, and a large majority of the applicants are applying for the scholarship, so the competition is even more fierce. I'd say you need to be in the top 10% of the applicant pool to stand a chance at a scholarship. Once again, do your research.

    I think this should give you something to consider for a while...
     
  18. Nick0726

    Nick0726 Member

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    GoalieDad, is is exactly what I'm looking for! Funny you should say, I've been sending emails to the Professors of Military Science and Enrollment Officers at the schools I'm interested in, asking how many scholarships they have available for in state and out of state cadets.

    For example: Indiana University was given 13 scholarships last year, 9 went to in state students, half of those were 3 year. I definitely recommend emailing ROTC cadre to any prospective cadets.
     
  19. kcdale99

    kcdale99 Member

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    I think part of it comes down to school choice. My son took the ACT 3 times and got 24 each time... He just accepted that was what he was going to get. He didn't take any high level math until this semester, already to late to help his ACT score. (Math was his ACT problem)

    When my son couldn't raise his ACT Score, he changed his target. he targeted schools that where a good fit based on his scores. His top choices where schools we knew he would could apply for and be accepted. Also schools he can excel in while he is there to help his OML standings later.

    My son was offered a scholarship to his first and second school of choice. The army helping pay the bill is nice, but he was going to go to the school and join ROTC regardless. The scholarship is nice because he can contract earlier, and have summer training opportunities.

    I really think being well rounded is very important. Here are my son's qualifications:

    Athletics:
    Varsity letter Track, Rifle Team, Band. Participated in Football until injury.
    Leadership:
    Eagle Scout: Secretary of Order of the Arrow Lodge. PL and SPL experience
    JROTC: Cadet Major, Battalion S3 - Operations Officer (150 student JROTC program). Cadet of the Month Award, NCO Excellence Award.
    Scholastics:
    ACT: 24, SAT around 1120 (don't have the exact number in front of me)
    3.6 Unweighted GPA, Top 25% of class

    My son went and visited the programs he was targeting. He met the cadets, cadre, and toured the schools. He has kept in touch with the programs and knew exactly where he wanted to go. In fact one program liked him so much that they are reaching out through him to his JROTC unit to set up some joint recruiting exercises.

    Based on his visits, my son decided on his 2nd choice, he liked the ROTC program best. He contacted the commander there and thanked him for his time, and told him he was accepting a 3yr AD scholarship to his school. The commander told him to show up 'ready to perform' and there may even be an opportunity to extend it to 3.5 years.

    While important, it isn't all about the ACT score.. there where people with 26s and 27s that didn't get any offers at all. Be well rounded. Don't lose focus on the other aspects of what the military is looking for. Leader, Scholar, Athlete.
     
  20. Nick0726

    Nick0726 Member

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    Thanks KCdale, that really helps out! I'll make my school choices appropriately.

    I take the test tomorrow at 8am, so I'll let you guys know how I do when the results come in!
     

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