Adjusting to the Sea

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by jmvogel, Feb 12, 2014.

  1. jmvogel

    jmvogel Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2014
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm from Indiana with almost no experience on ships. How difficult is it to adjust to the Navy life with being at sea all the time?? Anybody who has gone through this, feel free to share experiences.
    _____________________________________

    USNA Class of 2018 Appointed
    USMA Class of 2018 Appointed
     
  2. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2010
    Messages:
    7,547
    Likes Received:
    1,009
    I'm pretty sure that is going to vary form person to person and you probably won't be able to draw real conclusions from anecdotal evidence here. I will say my landlubber DS had no difficulties during his 4 week summer cruise. But then it's just 4 weeks, not 6 months. I think the toughest part for him was the 2 days it took to get his land legs back.
     
  3. usnabgo08

    usnabgo08 USNA 2008/BGO

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2007
    Messages:
    1,829
    Likes Received:
    595
    As kinnem said, it will vary person-to-person.

    But it is also hard to predict because it depends on the ship and sea state. For example, Patrol Craft and Mine Countermeasure craft are very susceptible to pitch and roll, which might cause one to get "sick" easier. Conversely, an aircraft carrier or large deck amphibious assault ship is less susceptible. Destroyers, Cruisers, and Frigates are somewhat in the middle, but a decent sea state could cause sickness. The good news....is you will eventually get used/accustomed to it and sometimes if you have been underway for a bit under an insignificant sea state and then hit a significant sea state, you might not feel the effects.
     
  4. Sledge

    Sledge Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2014
    Messages:
    614
    Likes Received:
    324
    Look at it this way.

    Chester Nimitz was from Fredericksburg, Texas.





    Oh, and there's a fantastic museum there if you are ever in the area.
     
  5. CannotBeDisplayed

    CannotBeDisplayed Member

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2013
    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    3
    I went there last May and ended up going back again because there was too much information to take in for one tour! Definitely recommend that place if you're ever in the area.
     
  6. SubRider

    SubRider Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    I knew quite a few people in the Navy that were from Missouri, Minnesota, and other mid-western states and they all adjusted to life at sea as well those that came from coastal states. You'll be fine.

    Most people get seasick at some point early on in their first tour of sea duty and then usually don't have a problem with it again.
     
  7. Ex.BT.USN

    Ex.BT.USN Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2013
    Messages:
    336
    Likes Received:
    20
    Like A Baby

    My first cruise was right into a north alantic storm...slept like a baby, there was nothing better than a 30 deg roll, loved it.

    If you get a top or middle rack and you know your heading into some serious rollers get an extra blanket and stuff it on the open side of your rack so you don't end up on the deck. I grew up on an island so being on a boat was like riding a bike for me. Yes, a ship is different but the tossing about is the same, actually can be worse. The cannons on the east coast can be tough for a 40' boat but just got to be out there for some great shark fishing!!

    Being on the big pond has a different affect on the masses but in time you get your sea legs. Don't worry you will adjust! :cool:
     

Share This Page