Advanced standing chances

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by BlazinGixxer, Nov 14, 2011.

  1. BlazinGixxer

    BlazinGixxer Member

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    Hello everyone,

    I'll give a little introduction about myself and my current situation along with questions. I will also break the sentences up for everyone to read.

    Currently, I attend a community college in CT pursing an AA degree in Nuclear Engineering Technology. I have a 3.54 GPA as of right now. I've also been working at the nuclear power plant around here as an Engineering intern and a nuclear technical specialist.

    I have applied to Ohio State University and Texas Tech to purse a BS degree in Chemical Engineering. (most likely)

    I have been in contact with the NROTC recruiting officers at both universities for AROTC and NROTC.

    The AROTC told me (From both universities) that I would be guaranteed a commissioning position if I transferred as a 4 year student.

    The NROTC told me that I would have to transfer as a 4 year student to be practically considered for the Advanced Standing. If I recall, the officer stated that "3-4 freshman/sophomores were accepted into the Advanced Standing."

    Now here comes my dilemma. I want to serve in the armed forces regardless. Preferably I would like to pursue the NROTC route. If I decide to go this way and was denied Advanced Standing, would it be possible to switch over to the AROTC?

    The Army officer said it would be possible to "transfer and do the program as a junior but really tough" but I didn't ask about switching ROTC programs because I didn't want to ruin any chances of either program.

    My ultimate plan if everything fails where I couldn't get into the NROTC Advanced Standing, switch to the AROTC, or originally start from ARTOC, I would enlist in the Navy as a Nuke and go that route. I started this path with a recruiter and scored a 94 on my practice test but I was encouraged to go the officer route.

    Sorry for the long post, with all those breaks as well. Any information about anything is greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

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    I think you could do it, but the logistics for finance/scholarships and LDAC (required month long accessions course for AROTC) could be difficult. In addition, squeezing in all of the AROTC material during junior/MSIII year could be annoying w/o prior service or LTC (a compression month long course for those who miss MSI/II year).

    Wait, Chem/nuke engineering? Why do you want to do join the army/navy again? Haha kidding but that is an excellent degree path. Using chemical engineering with a company like Dupont or working in a nuke plant as a reactor technician can make big bucks down the road.

    Enlisted navy nuke training is no joke and very useful for eventual endeavors, however I think your best bet would be to stay the university/officer route you are set on. (aka get the degree)
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2011
  3. BlazinGixxer

    BlazinGixxer Member

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    The AROTC cramming is what the officer was concerned with and encouraged myself to do the full 4 years. I honestly don't have anything against the option and would fully consider it if I wouldn't be considered for the NROTC.

    I know I "shouldn't" go the armed forces with that route if I wanted to go the money route. I have the experience of what its like at a nuclear power plant.. Sitting behind the desk and I absolutely hate it right now.

    Is it possible to switch from the NROTC to AROTC if I wasn't picked up?
     
  4. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

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    Even though I am AROTC I honestly think your best best would be to go NROTC if you have the chance. There are a lot more opportunities for chem/nuke in the naval world. The army has the chemical corps but the branch doesn't require any sort of chemical degree background nor does it exactly pertain to chemical engineering. It is more geared to NBC defense, detection etc... It would be a different matter if you said you wanted to be a doctor, dentist or nurse...then I would say go army..I was just razzing you about the military route, it is honorable that you want to serve and if that's your goal go for it.

    Yes, it's possible but in recent years scholarships are very hard to get...although a 2 year scholarship or contracted non-scholarship could be possible
     
  5. BlazinGixxer

    BlazinGixxer Member

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    That was a little depressing finding out the chemical corps wasn't what I anticipated.

    As of right now, I will have to keep asking the NROTC officer about the Advanced Standing every so often and consider the AROTC route as a possibility.

    From your experience right now, what are your chances of getting the MOS you want?
     
  6. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

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    Well, keep in mind I don't know everything about chem corps just from research and talking to a few chemical LTs.....but that is the gist of what I got from it.

    The army doesn't have MOSs for officers only branches. Branching is determined by a order of merit list (national ranking) or OML which factors in grades, PT, leadership activities, instructor evals and LDAC scores (major also plays a factor now). I will be in the nurse corps which is the only branch that can be determined from the beginning of the program because you are a NURSING major, everyone else goes off of a oml. You pick your wish list of branches then they use a formula to determine branch fill rates and some other outcomes...it's kind of a unknown/vague process to everyone not in cadet command but that is how it basically works. You are never guaranteed a branch unless you are top 10% of the OML
     
  7. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    I would assume the Navy would be interested in you given the majors you mention. You certainly have a shot at advanced standing with NROTC. This is from the official site where the NROTC College Progam is discussed:

    Since Advanced Standing is required to coninue in NROTC after sophmore year I would assume they wouldn't even take you into the program unless they were going to give you advanced standing. I suppose there might be a chance of a 2 yr. scholarship but I really don't know and I wouldn't plan on it, were I you.

    I think I'd be more concerned with figuring out how long it will take you to complete your major. If its still going to take you 3 - 4 years them maybe following the recruiters advise makes sense.

    Good luck! :thumb:
     
  8. BlazinGixxer

    BlazinGixxer Member

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    I am putting myself on the 4 year track to graduate from one of the universities regardless of transfer credits. I may dual degree or pickup a minor to replace those credits.

    I'm just not that "optimisitic" of my chances of doing the NROTC from "freshman" year vs AROTC chances. One of the officers told me that they had over 100 students and 80 were scholarship. Then out of those 20, 4 made the Advanced Standing. He also said that to remain competitive, I would need a 3.2 GPA or higher which is obvious.

    Any suggestions on the route I should take? Like taking the NROTC program all the way up until junior year with a small chance of picking up the scholarship?

    Also, thank you for all the replies.
     
  9. DeskJockey

    DeskJockey Member

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    Your academic performance, experience, and intended major would probably make you a strong candidate for the Navy's Nuclear Propulsion Officer Candidate Program (NUPOC). This program may be a better alternative for you than NROTC, for several reasons. First, you are not limited in your choice of colleges. (You could attend Texas Tech, which does not offer NROTC). Second, you get paid up to $5K per month while you are in school. Third, if you are accepted in the NUPOC program, you will be guaranteed a commission upon graduation, as opposed to having to deal with the uncertainty of the NROTC advanced standing hurdle.

    Of course, this assumes that you are ready to commit to serve as a nuke officer in the Navy. If you are, NUPOC is a great option.
     
  10. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    DeskJockey makes some good comments which would be worthwhile exploring. If that doesn't pan out then you would have NROTC as plan B. Again, given your intended majors I believe the Navy would fund you a highly desirable candidate. The numbers the recruiter gave you do not represent my son's battalion where only a few students from each class year are on scholarship. You are correct that there is always a chance of not getting advanced standing, but if you don't try I can guarantee your chances are 0. Let's say you don't get advanced standing. You still have OCS as an alternative for commisioning. Also I would assume there is a Navy equivalent to Marine PLC, but that's just surmise on my part.

    Following your dreams always includes the risk of failure, if nothing else, but you cannot achieve them without accepting the risks. Go for it. :thumb:
     
  11. BlazinGixxer

    BlazinGixxer Member

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    I thank you for the advice!

    I contacted an officer recruiter in Texas because he was the only one that would answer. I literally called Florida, GA, NC, SC, and Ohio.

    The officer was literally the nicest and straight forward recruiter I've talked too. He took down all my information and even forwarded it to a NUPOC "officer" (Some other title) for Texas Tech even when I said I wasn't sure I would be attending. He said he should call me tomorrow.

    Everything that I would need waived, is waiverable, and the NUPOC "officer" has all that info. They said to just keep my grades up and stay in touch while I complete my freshman year.

    My questions now, how would I look if I did the NROTC program and applied for the NUPOC? Does it look favorable?

    Also, what might the chances of being accepted into NUPOC? Well maybe applicant vs accepted?

    You guys are a great help! Thank you very much.
     
  12. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    OP: I found this googling NUPOC:

    "For some programs, you may apply as early as your sophomore year after completing one academic year of calculus and one academic year of calculus-based physics. Have you had those courses?
     
  13. BlazinGixxer

    BlazinGixxer Member

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    I have the calculus requirements but not the calculus-based physics as my current degree didn't need them. I regret not taking it already and that I didn't know that those physics courses are needed for other degrees. That is my fault.

    (That was explained to the recruiter as well. I didn't think of mentioning it in my previous post.)

    But that is why I would apply at the end of my freshman year to receive those calculus-based physics credits. I may even retake calculus 2 if it doesnt transfer.

    But other than that, the recruiter said I would be eligible.

    Thank you for the reply.
     
  14. DeskJockey

    DeskJockey Member

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    At this point, now that you have made a connection with NUPOC recruiter, I think that the best thing you can do is temporarily set aside any questions about what your chances are and simply focus on the process as you go through it. The important thing is that you have taken the first steps toward a noble (and attainable) goal. Trust in yourself. If you have questions - and you should! - I doubt that anyone who posts here is going to be better informed than your recruiter.
     

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