AFROTC application help

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by AF9, Jul 28, 2013.

  1. AF9

    AF9 Member

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    I was wondering if anyone had any tips on making your AFROTC scholarship more "eye catching". Anything like leadership programs, community service, etc. what looks best on them? I am a Junior in high school so I would appreciate info while I still have time to build my resume up :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2013
  2. hill82

    hill82 Member

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    Having been an avid reader and a sometime poster, I think the prevailing answer would be to make your resume as strong as possible in terms of academics, standardized test scores, athletically and leadership positions. As far as specifics, please be a little more revealing (not too much so, it is an online forum) as to your current resume and someone more knowledgeable than myself could probably give you sound advice.
     
  3. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    1st thing to understand is that for AFROTC scholarship applications the only thing you can update for SR yr is you SAT/ACT score.

    2nd thing is they DO NOT superscore. It is best sitting. It is to your best advantage to take both as often as you can afford to take them.
    ~~~ Some applicants do better on one test compared to the other.
    ~~~ SAT/ACT scores are @ 20% of your SFT score. It will be a factor when you are a sophomore for the SFT board
    ~~~ Best sitting is typically at least high 1200 for a type 7, and in the 1300's for Type 1. Our DS had 1390 as a non-tech.

    Third issue is they want to see leadership.
    ~~~ Just being a member of 10 groups may not wow them as much as 2 groups where you illustrate leadership positions. That goes for NHS and sports.

    Fourth area is academic profile.
    ~~~ Your course curriculum rigor is going to be a factor. A 4.0 cgpa with no AP/IBs will be seen differently than a 3.6 wgpa with 10 APs.
    ~~~ School profile will be looked at too. A ranking of 15% will be seen differently if the top 25% go Ivy in comparison to 15% when only 1% go Ivy.

    Finally the PFA will matter.
    ~~~ Bust one section, and you bust the entire PFA even if you max the other portions.

    They call it the WHOLE CANDIDATE SCORE for a reason. You can max out on the PAR (academics), but a low score on ECs and PFA, may result in the Thank you, but at this time we are unable ....letter.

    They want to see you can be a leader academically and outside of the classroom; it is what posters refer to the time management perspective. They, like college admissions understand the cliche about Jack/Jane all work and no play. They have seen many applicants that are incredibly book smart not transition well into college life.

    It is even more so with ROTC scholarships because they know ROTC can be 20+/- hrs a week more over their academic requirements. If they aren't illustrating it is a HS student, it gives them concern. It gives them concern if you have a ton of ECs, but no leadership because their goal is to make officers (leaders).

    Hope that helps. Best of luck.

    OBTW this is my best advice I can give. Look at the USAFA 16, if the 17 class profile is up look at that one. The AFA and AFROTC DO NOT TALK when offering appointments or scholarships. 90% of AFA applicants will apply for AFROTC scholarships as plan B. 90% of AFROTC scholarship applicants will not apply to the AFA as plan B. The AFA has a 16% appointment rate. That means a lot will take plan B....AFROTC scholarship. Looking at, and knowing AFROTC does not take AFA into the equation, plus it is a national board, it gives you more of an idea what the level will be like regarding the pool.

    I would also talk to the det at your number 1 college choice, not so much for fit, but also from a nursing aspect. I have said this before, nursing for the past few yrs is considered critical manning for ADAF, but if they have enough in the pipeline, it can now be changed from critical manning (edge for a scholarship) to not critical (no edge). They know more than us regarding personnel manning.
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2013
  4. aglages

    aglages Parent

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    As usual PIMA has offered excellent advice. Let me add this one additional suggestion: Finish you AFROTC application as early as possible. You will definitely want your application to meet as many boards as possible and there is no 100% certain method of predicting when the AF will begin boarding applicants this year. As PIMA said; you can continue to update your SAT/ACT scores (if necessary) after your application is submitted.

    Good Luck! :thumb:
     
  5. AF9

    AF9 Member

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    I am secretary for my class, Mu Alpha Theta, Red Cross Club, and Senior Beta Society. I am class representative. I am ranked in the top 5 in my class. I take early college classes in addition to regular high school. I also play volleyball. I also have a job, so my time management is very good..
     
  6. AF9

    AF9 Member

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    Do I have to take both the SAT & the ACT?
     
  7. Non Ducor Duco

    Non Ducor Duco I am not led, I lead

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    No. I only took the SAT.
     
  8. Thompson

    Thompson Member

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    Nope; however if you don't do so well on SAT, try the ACT - you might be able to score slightly higher.
     
  9. AF9

    AF9 Member

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    Is it okay to do only act?
     
  10. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    The reason to take both is due to the fact the board will use the higher score. AFRITC does not superscore, but a 30 ACT composite would be used for the selection over a 1250 SAT. They take the best sitting.

    Here is the true reality. 20% of all boarded candidates get a scholarship.

    Out of that 20% the breakdown is as follows.
    Type 1: 5%. 5% of that %% is awarded non-tech.
    Type 2: 15% of all scholarships are Type 2. Type 7 can convert to Type 2 3 yrs.
    Type 7: 80% of all scholarships.

    Typically in the past 5 yrs less than 1K are awarded a scholarship out of the pool.

    You have 0% chance if you don't apply, but remember it is a NATIONAL pool, it is not geo-centric like an SA nom.
     
  11. zrxkuma

    zrxkuma Member

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    Remember, the application is step 1. Step 2 is the interview. Presenting a polished, professional appearance during the interview is just as important as numbers on an application. Marginal numbers can be overcome by a well rounded application and a good interview. As stated previously, this is part of the Whole Candidate. Apply, get the interview, and then make it hard for them to say no to you.
     
  12. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    The interviews are very important, but IMPO, don't over think it. Chances are the CoC is an O5 (40 yo), and they probably have teenage kids, some might even has a child your age.

    They get it, you are nervous, and a kid.

    They are not expecting you to know what AFROTC or ADAF is all about. AFROTC exists to train. To this day with our DS(O1) at UPT, he beats himself up if he had a bad flight in his mind. I remind him that he is a student, if he knew it all already he wouldn't be at UPT, you'd be in an operational squadron. You are a student!

    Another example is the old joke about making O3 (rail road tracks) People will tell you with O1/O2 bars sheaaat rolls off, but with O3, sheaat gets stuck in between the bars. The same will be true in AFROTC. They expect C100/200's to make mistakes as a GMC, but when you become a POC their tolerance is low if you mess up.

    Interview tips everyone gives are:
    1. Sunday dress. Khaki's and a button collared shirt with boat decks are fine. Skirt and blouse for girls.
    ~~~~ No jeans, no flip flops, no skirts that are shorter than your finger tips. You don't need to buy a suit.
    2. Hair should look professional. Our DS had what I consider long hair...did not touch his shirt collar, but close enough for me. However he didn't look like he rolled out of bed either.
    3. Little things matter too.
    Hygene
    ~~~ Girls 2 inch finger nails will be a distraction. Guys, dirt under your nails is also a distraction. You might not look at hands, but people in their late 30's/early 40's do, especially when they shake hands....it is one of the 1st of the 1st impressions.
    ~~~ Guys shave.
    ~~~ Pop in a breath mint before you go in. Stop for lunch before the interview and have a tuna salad sandwich will not be appeasing when you are 2 feet apart shaking hands. Same with drinking an ice coffee. Just me, but tunafish makes me gag, if I smelled it on your breath, that would be something that will mentally connect you...OH yeah, that's the candidate that had tuna breath! Not the way you want to be remembered.
    Wrinkled clothes
    ~~~ They get a long car drive and creases behind the knees or in the hips, but iron the clothes before you leave.
    ~~~ DO NOT spritz yourself with perfume or cologne last minute. It can be overpowering, and for all you know the CoC could be allergic.
    4. Bring a resume
    ~~~ They will probably have a copy of your application on hand, but if they don't, you are covered.
    5. Ask the parents to meet you somewhere on campus (student union is a great place) in an hr or so.
    ~~~ Parents tend to be as excited as you, and can commandeer the conversation. The CoC wants to get to know you, not your folks!
    ~~~ Meeting later also allows you to walk the campus alone, something that you will do a yr from now. It gives you a glimpse/feel of what it would be like to be there by yourself. College students will treat you differently that way compared to if you were with the folks. With the folks is a blaring signal you are a HS kid.
    6. Parents DON'T DRILL YOUR CHILD on possible questions during the drive unless they ask for it. It is one of the hardest things to not ask how are you feeling, have you thought about if they ask XYZ? You have to curb your needs/desire from a parental perspective that just wants them to get their dream/goal.
    ~~~ Our DS competed state/national level for TKD. He would place in his earbuds and listen to his Ipod prior to a match. It was his way to zone.

    Most importantly for parents here. Right now your child is 17, but when they turn 18, legally you will be locked out regarding information. They cannot inform you of any status change without your child's consent because they are no longer a minor.

    I say this to drive home the point that they need to be in control of this process. ROTC is 4 yrs. If you are making sure by double checking now regarding paperwork, it will not be pretty next yr. Not only will ROTC lock you out, but most colleges will not release anything to you unless the student (your child) has officially informed the school that you have the right to access their account.
    ~~~ My biggest pet peeve! The school can see I am paying the bill from my checking account, but will not let me access to pay the bill or see their grades without my kids setting up an account for me! :bang::bang::bang:

    We have 3 kids. None attend/attended the same college. Our eldest graduated in 12, our youngest is class of 16. 3 kids, 3 colleges and they all have the same rule.

    ~~~You will not be with them next yr at college, best to cut that one apron string now so both you and them can get accustomed to working it out on their own. Just my 0.019854 cents.
     
  13. HerksRule

    HerksRule Member

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    AF9 - A leadership program to consider is Civil Air Patrol (CAP). My DS participated for a couple years, it made him comfortable around officers and others in an AF uniform. We are sure it helped him during the AFROTC interview and contributed to his scholarship award. He attended CAP one night a week during the school year.
     

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