AFROTC Arnold Air Society Entrance

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by rdesai11, Oct 12, 2012.

  1. rdesai11

    rdesai11 New Member

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    I'm joining AFROTC next fall in the three year program. Does anyone know about the entrance requirements into the AFROTC Arnold Air Society? What exactly do they do? What is the time commitment like?

    Thanks :thumb:
     
  2. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    If I am correct kevster on this site is an Arnie Air member. At our DS's det they not only AAS, but also Honor Guard, Angel Flight and Silver Wings. These organizations have unique aspects, but what you need to realize is like colleges they also have a unique personality at that one det. You should take your time once you are there and see which organization is a better fit for you personally before deciding on one.

    On a whole AAS will have a pledge semester and weekly meetings that are a couple of hours. Of course pledging you will spend more time because you are pleadging. They also do philanthropic projects which can range from Relay for Life to soup kitchens. Off the top of my cranium I can't recall what DS said was the min cgpa, because theoretically you shouldn't ever get near that cgpa, especially as a C100/200 since you are vying for an SFT slot. SFT selection cgpa is @3.0/3.1 for tech, and 3.3/3.4 for non tech.

    Hope that helps.
     
  3. SoleTrain

    SoleTrain Must be the Kicks

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    I'm an Arnie. There's a semester long candidate class/pledge program where you'll have weekly meetings to improve fun cadet stuff :)shake:) like uniform wear, drill, PT, leadership skills, etc. It can be stressful but it'll help you do better as a cadet for sure.

    Two notes:

    -AAS is a seperate program from AFROTC. Being a member doesn't give you an edge over nonmember cadets when it comes to going for an EA, pilot slot, etc. (the skills you learn in the society can though if you apply em correctly! :thumb:)

    -While you're a candidate don't EVER let AAS stuff take precedence over academics. A high GPA is way more valuable in AFROTC than a cord on your shoulder (the cord is pretty sweet though). Eventually when you get high in AAS you get responsibilities that must be met, but it never be done by sacrificing academic performance. Balance must be found.



    AAS is really fun and definitely one of my favorite parts of college. I've made a lot of friends and gotten to do a lot of cool things. Like next weekend I get to Las Vegas for ARCON. It's gonna be pretty dope.

    Good luck!
     
  4. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Side note of why I think it is great to join these organizations as an AFROTC cadet. You build life long friendships. Both my DH (Bullet) and DS were AAS. At their college, the most positive thing that came out of it was the bonding.

    Bullet commissioned 25 yrs earlier to the date that DS did from the same college. He is still friends with many of his AAS friends and they keep in contact via the net. Several attended our wedding. He still has lunch with them when they meet up at the Puzzle Palace.

    You will be amazed how small the AF is when you go AD. Your paths will criss cross over the yrs. We lived in AK 10 yrs after he graduated and one of them knew this, so when he was on TDY to Elmendorf, we had him over for dinner.

    Our DS is now at Laughlin waiting for his UPT class to start, 1 of his AAS buds is there with him. He had by all stds. a large AFROTC class, and he became closer to this guy because they were in AAS and AFROTC. He had a friend the minute he stepped foot on base. They shared not only the history of being at the same det., but in AAS together.

    You will also see it when you enter AFROTC. At our DS's det. they hold a dining in and a dining out every yr. Members of these groups have forges that they wear with their attire. DS's det is large. There must have been 300-400 people at the dining out last April. When you looked around the room it was comical because you could see it by the color of the forges they were wearing.

    I attended it last spring since it is also known as the commissioning ball. Our table was filled with blue and gold forges (AAS). Table to the right was blue and silver . The table to the left was blue and purple. The table at the 1 o'clock position was blue and white.

    I laughed because I didn't see one table where there was a mixture of different forges. There were tables with some that didn't have a forge, and some that did, but those with a forge were the same color.

    I know that sounds cliquish, but the thing is it really isn't. It is they hang with each other weekly for yrs and have formed a bond. It is natural when you have to make a table of 10 to sit with to hear boring speeches and eat green bean almondine, you want to sit with people you socialize with outside of AFROTC LLAB.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2012
  5. GemStateMom

    GemStateMom Member

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    DS is in his second year of Arnold Air. The last time I spoke with him and asked him about how much time was involved, he stated that he spends much more time on Arnold Air than on his "after hours" time with ROTC. It is quite a time commitment for him. It seems they always have some projects going on, such as highway cleanup or fundraising for one cause or another. I have to say that it concerns me and I worry that he is spending too much time on this and not enough time studying!
     
  6. Nateman15

    Nateman15 Member

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    As an Arnie myself, one of the biggest positives for my squadron is the added face time with the cadre. Our COC is the advisor for our squadron and it is a way to let them see you outside of LLAB.
     

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