AFROTC curriculum

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by thementoringtree, Jan 22, 2013.

  1. thementoringtree

    thementoringtree Member

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    The NROTC scholarship recipient is required to take physics in all four years of college. How about the AFROTC scholarship recipient? Is there a compulsory subject/course that has to be taken to ensure continuity of the scholarship?

    Another question : Can AFROTC scholars apply for study abroad (for a semester or two) at their respective colleges?

    Final question : Is flying, or knowing how to fly planes, a required training in the life of the AFROTC scholar?

    Thank your for any information that you can share.
     
  2. Dad

    Dad Member

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    You may want to ask this question on the ROTC forum. This forum is for questions about the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO. The Air Force Academy is a 4 year university funded by the United States Air Force.

    AFROTC detachments are located at many colleges and universities across the nation. Getting to your 3 questions;

    1. Physics is not required for all 4 years. It depends upon your major. You follow the curricular guidelines of your specific major (which is approved by the Air Force) spelled out by your college/university. Required AFROTC classes are taken in addition to your academic load in order to remain in AFROTC. It should be noted that not all AFROTC cadets are under scholarship. I am also pretty certain that not every NROTC scholarship recipient is required to take Physics for all 4 years. You might want to check your source on that.

    2. Studying abroad is difficult, but not impossible, due to the military and physical fitness requirements of AFROTC. This question should be directed to a PMS at a local detachment.

    3. Certainly not. Flying is only part of what the Air Force needs from its officers. Many AFROTC cadets pursue Air Force jobs other than flying. Therefore, learning to fly is not an AFROTC requirement.

    I hope this helps you understand what AFROTC is about. For better answers, go to the ROTC part of these forums below.
     
  3. Stealth_81

    Stealth_81 Super Moderator Moderator Founding Member

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    I moved this to the ROTC section.

    Stealth_81
     
  4. thementoringtree

    thementoringtree Member

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    Oh, thank you so much for all the information that you provided. I thought that since my questions were AF-related, then they belonged here. I am totally new to this forum, so I am not yet familiar with a lot of things. Nonetheless, I want to thank you so much for all the information.
     
  5. thementoringtree

    thementoringtree Member

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    Thank you for moving my concern to the ROTC section.
     
  6. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    As stated earlier, AFROTC will require your child to follow the curriculum that the college requires for their degree. The deal with scholarships is 80-85% of them will go to tech majors, so many do take 4 yrs of science or math, but the others, like our DS as a non-tech took 2 semesters because his college required that to graduate.

    The only time cadets tend not to want to study abroad is the fall of their soph or jr yr because these are the times that they will be submitting a packet for SFT (summer field training) or AFSC rated board. These packets include commander's rec. The fear is the old adage out of sight out of mind may come true. It is doable, but for many it just isn't worth the hassle.

    If they are going non-rated than change that to spring jr yr. since non-rated boards meet early in the fall of their sr. yr.

    As others have stated there are many career options that are not rated...Docs, nurses, JAG, Intel, police, etc. AFROTC cadets don't fly in AFROTC unless they are doing it on their own dime for their own desire. The ones you do see do it are ones that want rated. The reason why is they will take a test as a jr. and flight hours are bonus points for the test score.
     
  7. thementoringtree

    thementoringtree Member

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    Rated?

    "As others have stated there are many career options that are not rated...Docs, nurses, JAG, Intel, police, etc. AFROTC cadets don't fly in AFROTC unless they are doing it on their own dime for their own desire. The ones you do see do it are ones that want rated. "

    Hi Pima,

    What do you mean by "not rated? and "the ones you do see do it are the ones that want rate?" Sorry, again, I am trying to familiarize myself with a lot of lingo here....So an AFROTC does not really have to learn how to fly planes? DD might not wish to fly planes...But definitely, she admires people who can do that and who has that skill...

    Thank you.
     
  8. thementoringtree

    thementoringtree Member

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    "the ones you do see do it are the ones that want rateD?"

    Mea culpa...
     
  9. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Rated means you are flying. There are 4 types/career paths; pilot, CSO, ABM and RPA.

    Non-rated are not.

    The way the AFROTC system works is the cadets as a C300 can apply for the rated board if that is the career path they want. If they don't want to fly they just don't apply to that board and wait to meet the non-rated board which is in the fall of their 400 yr.

    It is not a requirement to apply for a flying position, it is just an option out there. Our DS's class graduated 50/50. 100% of them got their 1st choice regarding going rated or non-rated.
     
  10. thementoringtree

    thementoringtree Member

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    Oh, I see. So that is what "rated" means. Thank you so much, Pima.
     
  11. Invisibility

    Invisibility Member

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    For NON-TECH scholarship recipients (except Nursing), there is a language or math/physical science requirement. Either 4 semesters of the same language or 24 semester hours of math/physical sciences. You have to get it done before your senior year.

    Yes, they can, though it can be difficult. My interviewer said that he encourages cadets to go during their Junior or Senior years, since it is to their advantage for SFT selection to be there all four semesters possible.

    Others have said this, but you don't need to know how or learn how to fly to be part of AFROTC.
     
  12. thementoringtree

    thementoringtree Member

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    How are they different?

    Are AFROTC courses in the colleges/universities the same as those in other colleges/universities? I mean, is the AFROTC curriculum in College A the same as the one in College B?

    I wonder which one is more physically demanding---NROTC non-Marine option OR the AFROTC technical option?

    Thanks for whatever info you can share.
     
  13. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    The actual AFROTC classroom academic work is the same at each college. I don't know if each college gives the same credits for AFROTC. I know it can vary for some forms of ROTC from school to school. I'm sure the AFROTC experts will chime in here. I'll also rely on them to discuss the lab work and any training outside the classroom which might very well (I guess) change somewhat from school to school depending on the facilities available to them and access to military bases.

    I'm sure I'll get in trouble for this, but as far as the purely physical demands (ignoring late study hours, etc) there is no doubt in my mind that NROTC Marine Option is more physically demanding. Look up the PFTs for AFROTC (http://afrotc.com/how-to-join/high-school/requirements-standards/fitness/) and Marine PFT (http://usmilitary.about.com/od/marines/l/blfitmale.htm) and do a comparison. We can debate all day if pullups are harder than pushups, and AFROTC certainly requires a lot of pushups in a minute for a max score; but the key difference in my mind is Marine Options run twice as far, at the same pace, as AFROTC cadets to achieve a max score on the run.

    I'm not saying that AFROTC is not physically demanding, only that NROTC MO is more so... unless you really enjoy running, in which case its a lark.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2013
  14. thementoringtree

    thementoringtree Member

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    Thanks, Kinnem. Very much appreciated. I am learning a lot from you.
     
  15. Non Ducor Duco

    Non Ducor Duco I am not led, I lead

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    He asked about NROTC NON-marine option vs AFROTC physical differences
     
  16. Invisibility

    Invisibility Member

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    Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm fairly certain that there is no such thing as an "AFROTC technical option."

    Major does matter for some things, like SFT and scholarships. But apart from that, there is not a difference between a non-tech and a technical AFROTC cadet.
     
  17. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Duhhh... missed the "non". That's what I get for answering in the wee hours when I'm bleary eyed. Thanks for catching that.

    I don't know that there is that big a difference physically between Navy and AFROTC. Navy runs times are marginally more demanding. Same distance but faster pace. There is also the swim requirement in the Navy. But I think these differences are just noise.
     
  18. Non Ducor Duco

    Non Ducor Duco I am not led, I lead

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    Invisibility,

    You are correct, there is not. The OP might have been confused.

    Kinnem,

    Thanks for clarifying, I didnt think that there was much difference there, sometimes at my det AF & Navy work out in the same general area and from what ive seen, they do the same stuff we do. But as you noted, MO-cadets are a different story. I am curious though, what does the NROTC non-MO PFT consist of?
     
  19. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Non-MO is usually referred to as Navy Option (although it would include Nursing Midshipmen as well, but they're Navy too, so...). Events, except obviously the distance events, are 2 minutes vs. 1 minute in AFROTC. Hence the higher numbers for a good score.

    See this: http://www.nrotc.navy.mil/pdfs/Physical Standards.pdf
     
  20. Non Ducor Duco

    Non Ducor Duco I am not led, I lead

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    Thanks for the link.

    Our max and min scores in the sit-up and push-up sections compared to the amount of time allowed are a bit higher than NROTC-NO( i.e. NROTC push-up min for females is 19 and the max is 51 in 2 minute while the AFROTC min for females is 18 and the max is 47 in 1 minute), but the NROTC run max run times are about 40-50 seconds faster than ours. So there really isn't much of a difference between the two physically other than the swimming requirement.
     

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