AFROTC EA/SFT Selection Stats

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by The, Mar 30, 2014.

  1. The

    The Member

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    I am not currently in AFROTC so I do not know if they have been released yet, but what are the average stats(GPA, PT score, etc) of someone who gets selected for SFT, particularly this year? Once the numbers are released for this year is there anyway to see the average? I plan on joining as a sophomore this upcoming year and want to know what my chances are. Also if you join as a sophomore when is your packet sent to a board. Is only the first semester of your sophomore year factored into your GPA and all the other rankings?
     
  2. AspiringPilot15

    AspiringPilot15 Member

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    The stats are not out yet, because EAs (Enrollment Allocations) have not been released to those trying to go to Field Training. I joined AFROTC as a sophomore; fall 2013. As for your chances, you have the same opportunity as the other cadets in the detachment you plan to join. The key though, is to make yourself as competitive as possible. Your packet is generally sent in your spring semester during February. Your entire GPA of college is put in the package. Your best score between the SAT or ACT is sent, AFOQT score, and your commander's rank of you.
     
  3. The

    The Member

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    Do you feel like you are going to be competitive in regards to commander's ranking after only being there a semester? From my understanding this is a big portion and probably very hard to make much of an impression in only a semester. As for the ACT and GPA that doesn't seem to matter on only being in ROTC for a semester. Also do you feel like you were able to prepare yourself for the AFOQT with only a semester of ROTC classes or did you spend alot of your own time playing "catch up" in regards to AFOQT knowledge.
     
  4. ERAUMattmom

    ERAUMattmom Member

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    I'm sure it is a lot easier to do in a small detachment as opposed to large detachment where even cadets who have been there for a year and a half could slip through the cracks.
     
  5. Capt. Ahab

    Capt. Ahab Member

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    There is essentially no "catching up" on the AFOQT. It's a standardized test on basic knowledge (minus pilot), and you just need to do well. Cadets who have previously taken it are not allowed to give you certain information about it or study the material they had with you.

    It is hard to stand out in one semester, but you have to realize this may also work to your advantage if done right. It can be way more favorable than even being in the program for a longer period of time if you come in swinging and adapt quickly. Trust me, it won't go unnoticed. They're looking for good leaders or people with potential to lead. There is a difference between a good cadet and a good leader, but almost all of the time they are the same thing.
     
  6. Non Ducor Duco

    Non Ducor Duco I am not led, I lead

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    The AFOQT really isn't a big deal, if you did well on the ACT or SAT you'll do fine on this. There is no AF specific knowledge on it, the only sections you may really have to study for are the Pilot and Navigation sections if you plan on going for a rated slot (pilot, RPA, CSO, etc.). It's basically just the AF's version of the SAT/ACT. If you look it up you can see all the sections and what is on them. There are strict rules about studying for it that you may want to look up, but basically there is no studying with another person, using previously owned study material, and no one is allowed to help you study for it or give advanced knowledge.

    As for CC ranking as a 250, last year the EA slots given at my det were about 50/50 for 200s and 250s, many of the best cadets had just started that year. Just go hard, get involved, volunteer for stuff, and don't be afraid to speak up. It's good to join ROTC extracurricular like Silver wings or Arnold Air Society, it's a great way to get face time with the people who will be evaluating you (POC, cadre members). Organizations like that are good if you want to get involved, but you certainly don't need to join them in order to get a good ranking. In fact there are cadets in SW and AAS that in the bottom 1/3, so extra face time can be a good thing or a bad thing. Tech majors have an advantage, idk your major but as long as you can keep a high gpa, have good SAT/ACT/AFOQT scores (they take the higher of the 3 composites), high PFA, and are active in your detachment you will be just fine.

    Trust me, there are 200 cadets that have been there since day one who have skated by and stayed in the background so much that the cadre and POC barely remember who they are. There are 250s that are super involved and seem like they've been there forever and there are 200s that make you wonder why they are even still here. If you perform well, your ranking will reflect that.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2014
  7. The

    The Member

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    that's good to hear. I had about a 1900 SAT and after my first year I have roughly a 3.8 but im non tech. I haven't taken the air force PT test but i should be 95+ no problem. What is competitive for the air force pt wise? I dont see how my GPA could drop too much in a semester, but what is the average minimum for a non tech. I do have aspirations to go rated, so I would do my best to study for those sections once I know more about the guidelines for studying as well as look for things to work on militarily and physically over the summer. How important is the AFOQT, what percent of your overall ranking is it? Thanks for all the help so far.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2014
  8. Non Ducor Duco

    Non Ducor Duco I am not led, I lead

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    96+ PFA and 3.0-3.1gpa for tech or 3.3-3.4gpa for non-tech is considered competitive for an EA.
     
  9. Moosestache

    Moosestache Member

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    There are books you can buy to help you study for the AFOQT's. I do think they end up being more general knowledge, other than the pilot stuff though. I am not sure, but I thought they just looked at verbal and math on the SAT's, not the writing component.

    From what my son has told me, and the numbers people here have shared, I think you really need to be above 90%, and the more above 90 the better for your PT results.
     
  10. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Your cgpa is strong, and wanting to go rated as a non-tech will help.

    One thing to understand for the rated board, (this will be spring your 300 yr), part of the score is PCSM 2.0, and part of that score takes into account how many flight hours you have logged. If you have yet to log any pilot hours start doing so this summer. It is expensive, but it will give you an badge for the rated board. The thing people don't understand when they are coming into the system and say they want to go rated, they don't realize that they must accept all four rated AFSCs. IOWs just because you want pilot, and place ABM at the bottom it doesn't mean you won't get ABM as your career field.

    It may also give an edge as a 250 by showing the CoC you already have flight hours.
     
  11. Non Ducor Duco

    Non Ducor Duco I am not led, I lead

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    I think you're right about them omitting writing from the SAT and ACT scores, by composite I meant math+reading and whatever the sections are for the ACT minus writing.

    For PFA scores though a 90 is kinda low, at most dets the average PFA score for the wing is usually in the mid 90s. As long as everything is balanced out you should be fine, but really anything below a 95 is below the national average for a competitive pfa score.
     
  12. The

    The Member

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    I would be happy with any rated slot, granted pilot is number one but from what I've read they are all appealing to me. How many flight hours is worth it? Basically is there a scale for how many hours give you how many "points"? Is only doing like 5 or so worth the cost of flight hours. I would without a doubt be willing to pay for the flight hours if they would help my aspirations, also I would just love to get some flight experience as well.
     
  13. a400831

    a400831 Member

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    In order to see a noticeable jump in your PCSM 2.0 score, you really should log a minimum of 10 hours. Anything less then that won't really help your score. This is how the PCSM worked for me. I had a PCSM of 76 with 12 flight hours. If I flew 10 more hours, my PCSM would have been 81. However, it would have taken an additional 20 hours on top of that to see any increase past that.

    I would advise getting at least 10 hours of flight time in, it can only help. However depending on your AFOQT score you might want more to boost your overall score.
     
  14. AspiringPilot15

    AspiringPilot15 Member

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    The moment you start AFROTC, just hit the ground running. Volunteer for any opportunities, show up to as many things as possible. It wasn't that hard to be noticed at my DET, since it is fairly small. But, you still have to show out, and show the cadre why you deserve to go to field training. I realistically just studied for the AFOQT a week before the test, and I did just fine. I'm qualified for all rated positions. Standardized test don't bother, so it wasn't a bothersome to me. Definitely look over the info in regards to the pilot/nav section. There's tons of books and websites that can prep you for that.
     
  15. The

    The Member

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    do flight hours only count towards your score for a rated slot, or do they help with getting an SFT slot as well?
     
  16. Non Ducor Duco

    Non Ducor Duco I am not led, I lead

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    No, they don't count for EAs. Some commanders take ECs into account and then that might count for something, but most dont. With the supposed new rated EA boards, they might have a section for that next year, but I wouldn't count on it helping with anything but rated.
     
  17. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Only for rated does it have a direct impact regarding the scoring.

    It can have the ability to indirectly help from the standpoint of the CoCs rec/ranking because the CoC may see you as more competitive for rated than the cadet with no flight hours.

    It can also help you on the AFOQT pilot/Nav section and the AFOQT score since it is part of SFT scoring.

    Finally, although you have to log in a lot more hours to get the next big bump, but if you get your PPL than you will be able to waive IFS and go directly to UPT. IFS is nothing more than a chance to bust you prior to UPT if you have a PPL. At IFS about 25% of students wash out. Thus, it is to your advantage to get your PPL and not go to IFS.

    XPOSTED with Non Ducor.
    ~~~~ OBTW, at our DSs det., the CoC did take it into account when it came down to choosing between one cadet over another regarding ranking, but they also took into account belonging to military fraternities too.
     

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