Air Force Jobs and Majors

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by Stealth_81, Apr 13, 2010.

  1. Stealth_81

    Stealth_81 Super Moderator Moderator Founding Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Messages:
    1,664
    Likes Received:
    516
    Many posters have asked about majors at USAFA and what type of jobs are available. I have the information for the class of 2011, who will recieve their AFSC assignments in the next week or so. I am sharing this information (with permission) so that you can see what jobs are available and what major is recommended for that job. If it says "None" the job is available to any major. The first number is the ASFC code. If you want more info on that job, do a search for the code on google. The second words are the course or major required. The third is the description of the job, and the last number is the number of slots in that AFSC that were offered to the 2011 cadets. I am sorry that I can't get it to stay in nice columns, but I am not that computer literate. If anyone wants to copy the post and do that, it would be appreciated.



    Non-Rated Slots



    13DXA None Combat Rescue 6
    13DXB None Special Tactics 2
    13L None Career ALO 10
    13M None Airfield Operations 6
    13S None Space & Missile Ops 55
    14N None Intelligence 62
    15W Meteorology Weather 2
    17D 18 hrs IT CyberSpace Operations 41
    21A None Aircraft Maint 24
    21M None Munitions/Missile Maint 4
    21R None Logistics Readiness 24
    31P None Security Forces 17
    32EXA Architecture Civil Engr 0
    32EXC Civil Engr Civil Engr 3
    32EXE Electrical Engr Civil Engr 1
    32EXF Mechanical Engr Civil Engr 1
    32EXG General Engr Civil Engr 14
    32EXJ Environmental Engr Civil Engr 1
    35P None Public Affairs 6
    38F None Force Support 19
    61A1 Math / Ops Research Scientist 6
    61B1 Behavioral Psychology Scientist 2
    61C1 Chemistry Scientist 3
    61D1 Physics Scientist 6
    62EXA Aeronautical Engr Developmental Engr 8
    62EXB Astronautical Engr Developmental Engr 4
    62EXC Computer Engr Developmental Engr 4
    62EXE Electrical Engr Developmental Engr 3
    62EXG General Engr Developmental Engr 10
    62EXH Mechanical Engr Developmental Engr 4
    63A Engr, Math, Mgt Acquisition 50
    64P 24 hrs Contracting 25
    65F 12 hrs Financial Management 20
    71S None Special Investigations 7

    Total Non-Rated Line 450

    Rated Slots

    Pilot 500
    Nav 25
    ABM 14
    UAS 18

    Total Rated 557


    Rated 557
    Non-Rated 450
    Total 1007
     
  2. pn298ab

    pn298ab Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2010
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    [​IMG]


    Let me know if I misinterpreted anything or if there's a better way to represent this.
     
  3. Stealth_81

    Stealth_81 Super Moderator Moderator Founding Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Messages:
    1,664
    Likes Received:
    516
    pn298ab,

    That is great! Thank you.

    Stealth_81
     
  4. lga

    lga Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    what majors are those 12hr, 18hr etc?
     
  5. Stealth_81

    Stealth_81 Super Moderator Moderator Founding Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Messages:
    1,664
    Likes Received:
    516
    I believe that means that a major is not required, but you are required to have that many credit hours in subjects related to the job. Example: For IT/Cyberspace you should have 18 credit hours in IT or Computer Science.
     
  6. aggie83

    aggie83 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2008
    Messages:
    373
    Likes Received:
    5
    What does "rated" mean? I know those are the pilot/nav jobs but why are they called "rated"?
     
  7. Pima

    Pima Parent

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Messages:
    12,810
    Likes Received:
    957
    Curiosity is the 10 ALO's the Air Force Academy ALO or the ALO to the Army?
    I am going to guess that it the AFA because when Bullet was an ALO with the 82nd, it was really like taking a desk job none of the officers were officially permanent ALOs, but then again I thought the AFA ALO's were volunteer.

    I would also love to meet the Combat Rescuers because from what I have heard they are the SEALS of the AF.

    Lastly, I am curious about the pilot number, the AF has limited numbers of helos and I know one who wanted to get that, so does the Pilot number include helos or is it just fixed wing?
     
  8. lga

    lga Member

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2009
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just curious -- where do the rest of the class go? I assume we have more than 1007 in the class.
     
  9. Stealth_81

    Stealth_81 Super Moderator Moderator Founding Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Messages:
    1,664
    Likes Received:
    516
    Aggie83,

    I am not sure of the significance of rated vs non-rated. Hopefully someone else can explain the difference.

    PIMA,

    The Career ALO field was a new AFSC last year. It is the same Air Liason Officer field that Bullet was in. In the past the assignments were all temporary, which is what Bullet did. There had been a push to get them a permanent AFSC and now it has happened.
    Helicopter pilots slots are in with the 500. The helicopter pilots go to UPT with everyone else, and then if they choose helicopters in their drop, they will go to SUPT at Ft. Rucker with the Army helicopter pilots.

    lga,

    Good question. Anyone?
     
  10. aggie83

    aggie83 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2008
    Messages:
    373
    Likes Received:
    5
    The March USAFA Parent's letter (online at usafa.edu website) lists the enrollment in the Class of 2011 on February 28, 2010 as 1055 so that is not too far off from the current 1007 class size listed above.
     
  11. HP8892

    HP8892 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2010
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    What about careers going on to medical school?
    How are those "slots" assigned and how many can go?
    I know that only the top 10% have the opportunity to go on, but the list doesn't mention those....
     
  12. CadCandMateus

    CadCandMateus Recent Grad

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2007
    Messages:
    600
    Likes Received:
    13
    Some don't get commissioned.. (late grad, medical, etc.)
     
  13. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    2,241
    Likes Received:
    275
    AF helo students do go to Ft. Rucker, but they do an AF program there. It is not the same as the Army training for helo pilots.
     
  14. aggie83

    aggie83 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2008
    Messages:
    373
    Likes Received:
    5
    My understanding from a firstie that got a pilot slot his junior year, and is going to grad school this fall, is that his pilot slot is held for him. Those 500 pilot slots include those that might go on to grad school.
     
  15. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    Messages:
    4,963
    Likes Received:
    872
    Maybe my brain isn't working, but I'm curious about jobs not listed there that is normally classified as professional type jobs and require additional schooling. e.g. medical, lawyer, etc... where do they fit in for those interested? thanks... mike.....

    Apparently that question has been asked.
     
  16. hornetguy

    hornetguy USAFA Cadet

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    2,295
    Likes Received:
    129
    Medical school and Graduate school are not actual "jobs" but are boarded assignments (like ENJJPT).

    The Academy (last I checked) had 18 doctor slots, 3 nurse, 3 dentist, and 10 "extra" slots that can be used for any of those areas if more people wish to go. This year 13 are going to med school, 3 to nursing, and 0 to dental school.

    Grad school acts as an assignment before the main AFSC. Intel people go to Goodfellow after school, scientists go their way, etc. Pilot slots are held for grad students for when they graduate. How do I know?

    Also, people that go to med school are originally assigned a normal AFSC (I was still pilot after I got a med slot). That counts towards those big totals you see. They only drop that AFSC once they are awarded an HPSP/USUHS and accepted to a med program.

    My grad program is the longest program USAFA has at 3 years in school. After I get my degree I will head to pilot training. I'm fairly certain it will be the same base I got at 100s night (Laughlin).
     
  17. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    Messages:
    4,963
    Likes Received:
    872
    Thanks for the explanation Hornet. And UBER Congratulations on what promises to be one exciting career. You done did good. 1 more month. Best to you buddy. Mike....
     
  18. aglages

    aglages Parent

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,680
    Likes Received:
    4
    How does a nurse go to grad school without having a BSN / RN? AFA does not have an undergraduate nursing program.
     
  19. Gasdoc

    Gasdoc Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2009
    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    12
    Drawdown: Force to be cut by 6,000 airmen

    By Bruce Rolfsen - Staff writer
    Posted : Tuesday Apr 13, 2010 5:38:52 EDT

    Nearly 6,000 active-duty airmen — enlisted and officers — will be cut loose in the next two years because so few are leaving on their own to enter the tough civilian job market.

    The drawdown, coupled with the delayed commissioning of hundreds of ROTC cadets and severely curtailed recruitment goals, should allow the Air Force to return to its congressionally mandated active-duty end strength of 332,200 by the start of fiscal 2012. Active-duty end strength at the end of February stood at 335,500. The number is projected to be 336,500 by Sept. 30, the end of fiscal 2010, if the service does not implement the cuts.

    Air Force officials estimate the service would have to find nearly $200 million from existing accounts for salaries and benefits in 2010 alone if it does not begin trimming the ranks. They still expect to have additional personnel costs because of the phasing-in of the drawdown but could not give a dollar amount.

    The drawdown is one of three reductions outlined to Air Force Times by Brig. Gen. Sharon Dunbar, the Air Staff’s director of force management policy. Those measures will:

    — Pare down the officer corps by 1,373 and the enlisted force by 4,376; the numbers do not include expected retirements and separations.

    — Postpone until 2011 the commissioning of the 737 ROTC cadets who graduate this spring.

    — Hold back enlisted recruitment by 2,681; recruits with delayed entry agreements are not affected.

    The service intends to make the reductions through voluntary and involuntary separation programs but will not resort to the involuntary programs until it sees how many airmen leave on their own, Dunbar said.

    Voluntary programs such as asking the service to waive service obligations or requesting a transfer to the reserves or Army are available now. Airmen vulnerable to being cut will be notified by their commanders, she said.

    The top uniformed leader, Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz, announced the reductions to airmen in a letter dated March 25.

    “Please know that Secretary [Michael Donley] and I have carefully considered every option, but in the end, arrived at the conclusion that these force management initiatives are necessary,” Schwartz stated. “We must operate within our means.”

    The Air Force knew it had too many airmen last fall, Dunbar said, and tried to address the high retention by asking officers to leave early and moving up separation dates for enlisted airmen already heading out.

    About 3,700 airmen needed to take the options, but only 654 — 80 officers and 574 enlistees — signed up for early exits. In addition, more airmen decided to stay on active duty.

    Today’s plan is similar to the one the service used to bring down active-duty end strength from 372,000 in 2004 to 328,000 in 2008.

    The Air Force still feels the pains of that drawdown.

    Several officer career fields targeted for cuts then, such as intelligence, security forces, public affairs and civil engineering, are now labeled as “stressed” — there are not enough officers to fill home base and combat zone requirements without resorting to frequent deployments.

    Career fields targeted now, according to Dunbar, are considered overmanned after the service looked at how many officers are needed to do the job and long-term health of the career field.

    Despite cutting some Air Force Specialty Codes, many career fields are understaffed, Dunbar said. The Air Force continues to offer retention bonuses to pilots to meet the growing demand for airmen to fly remote-controlled airplanes.

    The new cuts will not change the selective re-enlistment bonus program, Dunbar said. Changes, however, could come later this year for AFSCs exceeding their retention requirements.

    Some specifics on the drawdown programs:
    Enlisted

    — Airmen in overmanned AFSCs who want to leave before the end of their four- to six-year contracts will find service commitments waived for up to two years.

    — Airmen who have been denied or have declined re-enlistment and have no more than 13 years of service or more than 20 years of service will be required to separate by the end of August. The service estimates about 1,500 airmen are affected.

    — Technical school students, not long out of basic training, with poor grades will be discharged instead of having a second chance and retraining into another career field.

    — Airmen who want to join Air Force Reserve Command or the Air National Guard can choose the Palace Chase program, which requires only one year of service with the Reserve or Guard for every year left of the active-duty commitment. Programs in the past mandated airmen to serve at least two years for every year left of active-duty commitment.
    Officers

    — Officers commissioned in 2006 and 2007 — most of them lieutenants — and serving in overmanned career fields will have the option to leave with waived service commitments or face a force-shaping board with the power to dismiss officers with the evaluations. The service will not have to convene the board if 41 airmen volunteer to leave.

    These officers do not qualify for separation pay because they have fewer than six years of commissioned service.

    — Officers commissioned in 1998-1999 and 2002-2004 now serving in overmanned AFSCs will be eligible for voluntary separation pay. The VSP will be worth twice the involuntary separation payment that is based on their rank and years of service. For example, a major with 12 years of service will qualify for about $188,500.

    Officers in the vulnerable AFSCs who do not take VSP could find their careers judged by a reduction-in-force board and then told to leave the service. The RIF boards will not be convened if enough officers — 585 — volunteer to exit. Officers told to leave by the board qualify for involuntary separation pay.

    — Retirement-eligible lieutenant colonels and colonels can request a waiver allowing them to retire with just two years in grade instead of three years.

    — About 685 lieutenant colonels passed over twice for promotion to colonel and 486 colonels in year groups 1981-1984 with four years in grade can volunteer to retire or face having their records reviewed by selective early retirement board in July.

    The Air Force needs up to 30 percent of those officers to retire by January.

    From asking for volunteers to ordering airmen to leave, the Air Force has several ways to cut its end strength. A sampling of the programs:

    Blue to Green — Airmen can apply to join the Army and serve in jobs that match their Air Force duties and rank.

    Date of separation rollback — Enlisted airmen ineligible to re-enlist or nearing retirement can leave earlier.

    Force-shaping boards — Aimed at lieutenants who lack the career protection of other officers, these boards are used to select which lieutenants from overmanned Air Force Specialty Code year groups must leave the service. These young officers do not qualify for separation pay. Lieutenants facing review by the board can volunteer to leave.

    Reduction-in-force boards — Among the harshest options for officers, these boards meet to decide which officers will be ordered to leave. Often the Air Force uses the threat of RIF boards to persuade officers in overmanned career field year groups to leave voluntarily rather than have their records reviewed by the board, typically composed of colonels and general officers.

    Palace Chase — This program eases the transition for enlisted and officers from active-duty service to the Guard and Reserve.

    Restricted accessions — The service cuts the number of new enlisted airmen and officers brought into the service.

    Selective early retirement board — Usually aimed at officers already qualified to retire, these boards can require officers to retire sooner than they wanted.

    Service commitment waiver — These waivers free airmen to leave the service without having to pay back education, training or permanent change-of-station costs.

    Time in grade waiver — These waivers are used primarily to allow retirement-eligible lieutenant colonels and colonels to retire with just two years in their final rank instead of three years.

    Voluntary separation pay — This payment is typically offered to midcareer officers, primarily captains and majors, as an enticement to leave before they become retirement eligible. The amount of pay varies based on such factors as the officer’s base pay and how much money the Air Force believes is needed to convince an officer to forgo retirement benefits. In 2007, VSP was roughly equal to three years’ base pay.
    Who’s out

    Air Force Specialty Code and year groups that could face a force shaping board if not enough of the officers agree to leave:

    13S Space & missiles — 2007

    15W Weather — 2006

    21A Aircraft maintenance — 2006

    38F Force support — 2007

    61A Operations research — 2006`

    61B Behavioral scientist — 2006

    61C Chemist/biologist — 2006-07

    71S Special investigations — 2006-07

    ———

    AFSC and year groups eligible for voluntary separation pay. If not enough officers take the incentive to leave, the service will stand up a reduction-in-force board for:

    13S Space & missiles — 2002-04

    15W Weather — 1998-99, 2002-04

    21A Aircraft maintenance — 1998-99, 2002-04

    33S Communications — 1998-99, 2002-04

    38F Force support — 1999, 2002-04

    52H Chaplain — 1998-99, 2002-04

    61B Behavioral scientist — 2002-04

    61C Chemist/biologist — 1998-99, 2002-04

    65F Financial manager — 1998, 2002-03
     
  20. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    Messages:
    4,963
    Likes Received:
    872
    You know what's really sad? They are short $200 MILLION for salaries. Sounds like a lot of money, doesn't it? Yet, they can go HUNDREDS of BILLIONS of dollars and even pounce the national debt into the TRILLIONS, for many things our country doesn't need. Yea, some people really have their priorities straight.

    $200,000,000 (200 Million)
    1/5th of 1 Billion dollars
    1/50th of 10 Billion dollars
    1/500th of 100 Billion dollars
    1/5,000th of 1 Trillion dollars

    Sorry, but I have very little respect for many of our Washington Leaders. Call me bitter and pissed off. That's OK. Washington is bankrupting our country, instilling an "entitlement" mentality and dependency on our citizens, and our country will pay the price for generations to come. And the ONLY truly SELFLESS group of Americans, willing to look the other way and still believe in the greatness of our heritage, our constitution, and our freedoms; (Our service men and women); are the ones who will get SCREWED the hardest. Sorry folks, I have to say what I believe is the truth. Mike....
     

Share This Page