Air Sickness -.-

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by xeonv2, Feb 23, 2011.

  1. xeonv2

    xeonv2 USAFA '15

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    I've always loved the idea of flying and for ROTC I was given an opportunity to do a CAP flight. The first several minutes were great and I absolutely loved the feeling and view of flying over the gorgeous Seattle area! But later on I let go of the controls and the pilot made a steep quick turn and boy did everything go downhill from there. I started to get queasy and the rest of the story is probably a bit too embarrassing to share but yes I ended up seeing my breakfast. :yllol:

    Later on the pilot tried to cheer me up by saying that he always used to get sick while flying during the beginning especially when he wasn't in control of the plane so he said I shouldn't worry about it too much.

    So I was wondering if anyone knows of any cases in which cadets, who at first were susceptible to being air sick, eventually "got over" air sickness? :smile:
     
  2. futureAFA

    futureAFA Member

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    I used to get motion sick, now I don’t at all. it IS possible to get over, but it isn’t a real quick thing. It just takes time I guess I’m no expert.

    I used to throw up if I wasn’t looking forward at all times, now I watch movies on my ipod in cars and I am fine.
     
  3. Ken2012

    Ken2012 Prospective

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    Hey don't worry about it I threw up on my last CAP flight too, which was my third. I have the same problem too... I feel horrible when I'm not in control.

    I'm no expert in aviation or sicknesses (My impressive 3 hours of flight haha), but I think that it is very unlikely that you have a major problem. It was probably just one of those days. I'm sure there are plenty of ways that people cope with it if need be.

    This reminds me of a story that happened to two cadets I know in their early CAP days, about 13 or 14 years old. They were both on their first flights and the pilot (Who is a very easy going, comical type of guy) could tell that they were nervous. So about twenty minutes after take-off, the pilot shouts "Hey, light up a little bit, will ya guys?" and he reaches across, grabs the controls, and turns the plane perpendicular to the ground. :biggrin:
     
  4. AzStudent

    AzStudent Member

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    Hey, even Chuck Yeager hated his first flying experience. I think flying is something that grows on you and is something you learn to lover overtime.
     
  5. futureAFA

    futureAFA Member

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    I actually have my first O-Flight tomorrow!
     
  6. thehoaxbuster

    thehoaxbuster Member

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  7. hornetguy

    hornetguy USAFA Cadet

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    Air sickness is incredibly common. My hands and feet won't fit the number of friends and classmates I knew at USAFA who got airsick. I have gotten airsick here and there. It happens.

    If it is a bigger issue than needing to acclimate to a few flights, the Flight Surgeons are trained to help solve the problem. While visiting a few bases I talked to some flight docs and also got to see some of their training facilities. The typical one is the spinny chair in a room with airplanes hanging in the corners. They facilitate a series of exercises to help teach people techniques for overcoming the issue. One example that I don't think many know (except figure skaters?) is to lead your head motion with your eyes. Look first then turn your head. It's a simple one they teach which helps many people.

    Remember, in most cases motion sickness is your body and senses being overwhelmed by too many stimuli. The techniques are ways of eliminating the extra stresses which lead to sickness. Limiting rapid head movement, eye leading, COOL AIR, proper breathing, and corrected eyes (if you're squinting or having difficulty seeing, that hurts your sickness) are all ways to remove some stresses.

    I will say, in my first F-15 ride I resisted the urge to hurl for an hour, but I was always uncomfortable because of it....my second flight I let loose the heaves when it hit me, then I enjoyed the rest of the flight. Also, I found an enormous difference between just 2 flights. The first one (one hour flight) demolished my body; I slept for 16 hours straight when I got back to my room. After my second one (1.5 hours), I went to a BBQ and was energized. My body was ready the second time. Those planes shouldn't move in the way those babies could!! O_O
     
  8. bugsy

    bugsy Member

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    Airsickness management

    The Air Force has a very effective air sickness management program run by the Aerospace Physiology community. Peterson AFB right next to USAFA has an aerospace physiology unit that will teach cadets destined for aviation the altitude chamber, G forces and of course airsickness issues. If you need addition acclimization they'll put you in the Barany Chair "aka spinny chair" teach you breathing techniques etc. A frozen bottle of water in the G suit does wonders. Nothing settles the stomach better than cold water. The new on board oxygen generators in the T6 dont allow for the cold blast of LOX that we used to get in legacy aircraft.

    Bottom line, your way to early in the program to worry about motion sickness. Worrying about it will make you more prone.
     
  9. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    Most people can overcome airsickness. I know one who did not, but the vast majority of people will acclimate to flying.
     

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