Another DQ Question

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by MosMom, Sep 23, 2013.

  1. MosMom

    MosMom Member

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    My daughter just received a letter stating she should begin the DODMERB process. After reading all the "asthma DQ" posts, I'm quite concerned she will have a problem because of one occurrence in her medical history. This is her story:

    About 2 years ago, (when she was 15 yo) she was participating in a one on one training session with her volleyball trainer - it was a brutal workout. The gym she was practicing in just had the floors sanded and after a while, she began wheezing and had slight numbness in her arms - most likely from her trouble catching her breath. We made an appointment with her pediatrician and the pediatrician sent her to a cardiologist for a heart ultrasound as a precaution (because of the numbness in her arms) and also as a precaution, prescribed an inhaler. My daughter never had any difficulties with breathing after that... and never used the inhaler. The heart ultrasound found nothing wrong with her heart. We have always thought her issues that one day were caused by some irritant in the air from the sanding of the wood floors.

    Now, because she was prescribed an inhaler and had a heart ultrasound performed because of the breathing issue...it appears from what I have been reading, she will be DQ'd. I have not yet completed the history part of the form she must take to the DODMERB/doctor. I'm trying find the best way to answer the issues of the one breathing problem she had.

    She is a 4 year Varsity letter earner at her high school and is in excellent condition. Can't believe one occurrence could ruin her chances.:thumbdown:

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Honestly expect at least a remedial, and be prepared for a DQ.

    That being said if you have the medical records to prove it was a 1 time prescription at 15, I wouldn't be concerned.

    Asthma is a biggie, but it is a case by case. I would be prepared for a longer process, but I would not say it is over.

    Get the physical done ASAP because the fact is she was prescribed an inhaler after age 13. The sooner you do it, the faster you will know the answer.
     
  3. sheriff3

    sheriff3 Member

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    not so fast... I don't see anywhere on your post where your DD was diagnosed with asthma. Start gathering medical records from the episode in question. Once you complete the medical history form send it in. DD will either be qualified ,asked for a remedial or DQ. Be prepared to supply any medical history pretaining to this episode. The more detailed info and the quicker it is supplied the better. Also be prepared to get letters from coaches attesting to your DD ability to perform strenous physical activity without the use of an inhaler.What you put in your post here on the forum is very good infor for them to use.
    About 2 years ago, (when she was 15 yo) she was participating in a one on one training session with her volleyball trainer - it was a brutal workout. The gym she was practicing in just had the floors sanded and after a while, she began wheezing and had slight numbness in her arms - most likely from her trouble catching her breath. We made an appointment with her pediatrician and the pediatrician sent her to a cardiologist for a heart ultrasound as a precaution (because of the numbness in her arms) and also as a precaution, prescribed an inhaler. My daughter never had any difficulties with breathing after that... and never used the inhaler. The heart ultrasound found nothing wrong with her heart. We have always thought her issues that one day were caused by some irritant in the air from the sanding of the wood floors.

    DoDMERB may be forced to DQ based on the inhaler and that is was prescribed (even if not used). Depending on where you apply SA, ROTC and branch, they will make the final call. Best advice I can give is start gathering medical records and keep the process rolling by doing what they ask for in a timely manner. Best of luck.:thumb:
     
  4. sheriff3

    sheriff3 Member

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    PIMA you type much faster than I do...
     
  5. MosMom

    MosMom Member

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    Thank you - She is applying for the USNA.

    I will contact her pediatrician tomorrow and see what exactly is in her medical records.

    I have never heard the words "your daughter has asthma" come out of her doctor's mouth. In fact, I don't believe the Dr. has even mentioned asthma. But, she did prescribe an inhaler just in case she had wheezing again... but that never happened.

    Does anyone know if it is possible to get records from a pharmacy stating the prescription was never refilled?
     
  6. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Some others may know, but a phone call to the pharmacy can't hurt.

    I also wanted to suggest care in answering questions. You should educate your daughter on this as well. Assuming the med records match your tale (and I expect they do) then be sure not to answer yes to asthma. Ever used an inhaler? No. It's not an effort to hide anything but to be accurate and honest. At the same time I wouldn't volunteer any info that is not asked for either, until it comes time to clarify, if it ever does.

    I say educate your daughter because sometimes some kids don't get it. I know of a kid once who had some legal issues that never went to court, and even the ticket was expunged. Notice I said ticket. Yet, when asked if he was ever arrested, he wanted to answer 'Yes'. Clearly he wasn't and answering yes would have been the wrong answer. But answering 'yes' would have clearly blown his opportunity. Anyway, that's where this advice is rooted.

    Good luck to your DD. I expect all will be well, although it may be a long road. :thumb:
     
  7. MosMom

    MosMom Member

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    Thank you! I will contact the pediatrician tomorrow and ask some specific questions. Then, once I receive answers, I will definitely make sure my daughter is on the same page as her doctor. I think it's important to be honest. Lying would only set my child up for failure and it's not worth it.:smile:
     
  8. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Absolutely! Good luck! :thumb:
     
  9. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Just my 0.019853 cents, but ALWAYS be on the same page as the doc.! If a remedial is requested, they will see ALL of their medical records.

    It is hard, but it is something you have to go through.

    Just Believe!
     
  10. Ex.BT.USN

    Ex.BT.USN Member

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    Been Where You Are

    MosMom,

    My DS has been down your DD's road and that was less than a month ago. Pima & Kinnem have given me the guidance your needing now.

    I listened! My DS went through DoDMERB; however, as I said we took the suggestions from Pima & Kinnem and instead of a DQ our DS got a remedial. We were well prepared.

    A file of paper work later and a trip through snail mail our DS got his 2nd. Q for his medical. (I say 2nd Q only because he passed his CFA in June).

    I wish your DD all the very best...
     
  11. MosMom

    MosMom Member

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    OK, I just spoke with my DD's pediatrician and received information regarding the following questions that I was concerned about:

    Ever had asthma or wheezing?: Doc said DD was never officially diagnosed with asthma. In her notes, she states she was concerned with the possibility of exercise induced asthma. Doc said I can answer honestly that she never had asthma or wheezing. I will answer "NO".

    Ever had unusual shortness of breath?: Obviously she has, which has led to all this mess. I will answer honestly that she has. Any recommendations as to how much info I should provide them with? I will not mention she was given an inhaler, but should I mention the circumstances of her shortness of breath? The example of the freshly installed/sanded/chemically treated floor? Also, several other athletes suffered from similar symptoms after the floor was sanded and installed... I heard this from other "volleyball moms" as they were not too happy to have kids struggling to breathe. Do I mention this as well or keep it very short? Any help would be appreciated!

    Thanks so much!
     
  12. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    I'm not a doctor and your answer depends on the question posed on the form.

    If it asks to amplify on a "yes" answer to shortness of breath, I would state the facts as you did in your original post. I would not go into (unless asked) the diagnosis, the doctor's thoughts about possible diagnoses, the medication prescribed and/or taken, etc. I would state that she has not since experienced a similar event.

    You will likely get a remedial requesting the medical records and they will speak for themselves. DODMERB will make their call based on those records. They MAY -- or may not -- request additional testing. If your DD does receive a remedial, don't hesitate to contact, or have her contact, DODMERB for guidance. I hear that these days they are quite helpful.

    Your policy of being honest is an excellent one -- not to mention a great role model for your DD.:thumb:
     
  13. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    Keep in mind I am just a parent, and of an NROTC midshipman at that. If there were sufficient room I would tell them exactly what you told us, including the inhaler and its non-use. I would also mention the fact that several other athletes had the same problem. But that's just me. My logic is the more light you can shed on the incident, and the fact that it was only one and was communal, the better things will go. You're already in fairly good shape given you can say no to asthma. Good luck. You may want to wait and hear other opinions as I'm sure others will contribute here. :thumb:
     
  14. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I agree with both usna and kinnem.

    The fact is since she will answer yes to shortness of breath it is highly probable they will give her a remedial, thus when she sends in her medical records for the remedial they will see she was given a prescription for an inhaler.
     
  15. soccmomer

    soccmomer Member

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    If the yes triggers the same questions it did for us(it will be similar to the examples given on the DodMERB forms), you will need to put Doctors seen, any tests they did, and what they did. then you answer "Did it help" or what was the outcome, etc. You can put inhaler given, but not used, that the condition resolved itself in X hours, and that there have been no further problems. They may ask activity level (current or something). For DS's we stressed that full return to activities, which included (this sport, that sport, x hours per week of practice, marching band involving X hours per week of practice, etc). Don't be afraid of the yes answers, even though it is scary.
    We had yes answers to head injuries, CT scans, x-rays, but the findings of all the tests were negative, so putting down her tests, and being able to say "all was fine" is a good thing.
     
  16. MosMom

    MosMom Member

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    Thanks for all the help! I think we've figured it out... and will wait and see what happens. DD is very discouraged, down but not out, especially after reading all this information. She's not giving up... but is realistic and has started focusing more on Plans B and C. :frown: This weekend will be spent completing applications to Ohio State and Miami U (Ohio)...
     
  17. soccmomer

    soccmomer Member

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    Chin up Mosmom's DD!!! I have a feeling this is not going to be as bad as she thinks - but that is just one mom's opinion. I was so very worried about my S's concussions, and he got a big fat Q, not even remedials. Since the diagnosis was never asthma, that is definitely in her favor.
    Focusing on Plans B and C is a wonderful idea(while still completing all requirements for Plan A of course!), as it takes some of the pressure and worry off Plan A!
     
  18. MosMom

    MosMom Member

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    Update

    My daughter had her DODMERB physical late October. She had to wait until Volleyball season was over to have it done because she couldn't be without her contact lenses for 3 days as required by DODMERB.

    She answered all questions about being prescribed an inhaler honestly and just received a letter from DODMERB saying that she is required to have a complete spirometry breathing test completed by a physician selected by DODMERB.

    We have an appointment scheduled for Tuesday...and she and I feel good about it. I had expected to jump through all kinds of hoops getting letters/documentation from coaches, doctors etc... But, it seems DODMERB will simply require the spirometry test.

    Thanks for all the advice! It has been so very helpful. Cross your fingers that she passes the spirometry test!
     

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