Any Insight Would be Appreciated

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by ProudSpartanDad, Oct 31, 2015.

  1. ProudSpartanDad

    ProudSpartanDad New Member

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    Greetings,

    DS is 3rd year AROTC and has been doing very well academically and in the program. He is seriously looking into law school before duty. I have been trying to assist his decision making but feel like the information that I locate is somewhat flimsy. It seems to me that his choices are: 1) Apply for Education Delay in which if he doesn't qualify he is slated for active duty, 2) National Guard while attending laws school, 3) Army Reserve while attending law school. DS preference would be to select active duty and receive an education delay.

    Any insight on the chances of the education delay request? I even thought that I read once on here that a cadet switched from Army to Navy when commissioning to attend law school? Wow, sorry for the long email and numerous variable.
     
  2. bman

    bman Member

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    Don't know about Army, but I do know that switching to Navy for an education delay is not an option.
     
  3. Wilco

    Wilco Member

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    Check out the website ROTC ED-Delay – JAGCNet

    Also past thread on this forum “Road from ARMY ROTC to JAG Officer”


    Remember active duty is not guaranteed for AROTC, even 4 year scholarships awardees. Needs of Army will always prevail. Army utilizes national order of merit to rank cadets, including, GPA, ROTC performance, extra-curriculars, PMS, , and have been advised process has changed again over last couple of years. Even if receive educational to attend law school delay no guarantee acceptance into JAG corps upon graduation. So may end up with a JD branched elsewhere. Understand process cadets start application end of junior year, LSAT, applying to law schools. Only if accepted will receive educational delay. Plus if applying for educational delay some have advised cadet will not be as competitive for first choice for branching if not receive ed delay. Also if goes Reserve or National Guard, may be looking at up to a year to start law school because cadet will need to a find unit opening, go to BOLC. Keep us advised.
     
  4. ProudSpartanDad

    ProudSpartanDad New Member

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    That is the type of information I am looking for. I know that we understand many of the factors that you mentioned. He has taken the LSAT and is very competitive for top flight law schools between his score and undergrad GPA. I believe that he will have a number of options in which school to attend if that is the route that he selects. He also loves the idea of serving so he will have a tough decision to make. I am just trying to help guide him and assist in his research process.
     
  5. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    Another option that takes the long view is getting a commission, via the route that suits best, then serving as a warfare officer. Complete initial obligation, with a great performance record, and serve long enough to earn full Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits. Separate. Use GI Bill to go to law school, again do well, then apply for direct commission in JAG in original or other service. No guarantees, but successful service as an officer gives an enormous edge over Joe or Sally civilian law school grad applying for direct commission.

    For GI Bill benefits: Search on va.gov for Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits. Law schools like vets and those who have actually seen a bit of the real world.

    I have seen this method used by junior officers who worked for me, warfare officers who got out, used GI Bill to finance another professional degree, then come back into their original service or another service as JAG, chaplains, clinical psychologists, etc.

    Many took LSAT, MCAT or other refresher courses and re-entered student world easily.

    Other paths may open up - other Federal agencies such as FBI or CIA, who would value officer veteran status and law degree. You just never know...

    Remind DS he will not be teetering on the edge of the grave if he goes to law school in later 20's - he will blend in with all the other older students and have the edge on maturity and self-discipline.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2015
    bman likes this.
  6. ProudSpartanDad

    ProudSpartanDad New Member

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    Never even considered that approach but very appealing. Thank you for the insight.
     
  7. Wilco

    Wilco Member

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    Other option is highly competitive program where military will pay for law school. Can apply after 24 (?) months active service. So would seek branch attend BOLC, and go into service. Understand 2014 20 accepted; and unlike AROTC does not pay full tuition at private schools. Generally limited to state tuition; and cannot take out extra loans to pay difference. Continue to draw pay while attending school, to cover room and board; and time in school counts towards service and promotion, but would need to clarify that. Also will owe 2 years for each year of school, so another 6 years, plus believe that would be on top of any additional time owed for AROTC but no certain on that. Also remember if considering educational delay only available to those going active duty.

    FUNDED LEGAL EDUCATION PROGRAM

    1. Description of program. The Funded Legal Education Program (FLEP) authorizes the selection of 25 Active Duty Army officers (lieutenants or captains) each year to obtain a legal education at government expense.

    2. Eligibility and Application Procedures. Details regarding eligibility, the application process and service obligation with regards to FLEP are outlined in Army Regulation 27-1, Chapter 14 (AR 27-1). The eligibility requirements in AR 27-1 are statutory and cannot be waived. The cutoff for eligibility is 6 years of total active federal service, including warrant officer or enlisted service, at the time legal training begins.

    3. Selection criteria. When considering an applicant's file, the selection board members use the "total person concept". They evaluate the undergraduate and graduate school transcripts, LSAT score, ORB, OERs, SJA interview letter, and statement of motivation to attend law school. Applicants with 2 1/2 to 4 years of commissioned service are the most competitive.

    Twenty-one (21) were selected in December 2013. The following are statistical averages from that board:
    Average undergraduate GPA: 3.59
    Average LSAT score: 161 (83rd percentile)
    Twenty (20) were selected in December 2014. The following are statistical averages from that board:
    Average undergraduate GPA: 3.47
    Average LSAT score: 163 (88rd percentile)

    4. Funding. Officers interested in the FLEP program should be aware that participants will normally attend a state-supported school where they qualify for in-state tuition, or where military members are granted in-state tuition rates.
     

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