Any Law Enforcement folks with experience in Class I Railroad Law Enforcement?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Full Metal Bulldog, Jun 12, 2015.

  1. Full Metal Bulldog

    Full Metal Bulldog Citadel Class of 2016

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    This may not be the perfect section to post this thread, but I was wondering if any of the several parents/mentors on this site who have experience with law enforcement careers have any knowledge regarding railroad law enforcement? I've considered working for a Class I railroad (CSX, UP, NS, etc.) after my military career and I was paroozing the CSX website and noticed the "special agent" railroad law enforcement/security career path. I never really considered a law enforcement career in the past, but this peaked my interest. Anyone care to share anything they may know?
     
  2. Sandbar

    Sandbar Member

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    If you are interested in Law Enforcement I would suggest that you look at County or City Municipal Departments.
    On the federal level I would look at DEA FBI ATF. CSX is a private Company that has a Police Agency under the Federal Railway Act.
    It is more of a security force rather that a Police Agency. They have police powers but if you want to be a Cop than apply to the
    local government agency of your choice. You will not be doing mainstream policing for CSX.
     
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  3. Wishful

    Wishful Parent

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  4. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    "paroozing"??
     
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  5. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    What's not to Parooz.

    Got to love the Urban Dictionary, spelling not required.
     
  6. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    Perhaps the meaning of "Paroozing" is similar to "Schmoozing" (after all they both have "ooze" in them)? I was perusing the dictionary and was not able to come up with a definition of paroozing but it sounds plausible. o_O
     
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  7. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Need to check the Urban Dictionary, it's where all the cool kids go.
     
  8. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    Spelingness is next to Godliness
     
  9. sheriff3

    sheriff3 Member

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    +1 to sandbar.
    Railroad Police is not by any streach of the imagination considered law enforcement ( think mall cop with a real gun). Consider federal, state or local. Might also consider state dept security. If you like to travel a lot but have no family life look at federal air marshal. Tons of different oppurtunities available out there.
     
  10. Lawman32RPD

    Lawman32RPD Member

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    Law enforcement means many different things. I've been bouncing around law enforcement for the best (longest?) part of my adult life The uniformed police function (street cops) is mostly about order maintenance. That said, the police function even when talking about street uniformed enforcement is pretty variable; the life of a beat cop in New York City is a lot different than that of a Sheriff's Deputy in Catron County, New Mexico, with about 6,000 square miles and around that many people. I've worked a few cases with railroad police and many of the comments are, in my opinion, largely correct. Federal law enforcement is different yet again. State and local law enforcement, as a general rule, tends to be more episodic in nature; did Farmer "A" steal Farmer "B"'s cow, did "C" drive drunk on "Y" date, that sort of thing. The quintessential federal case is more focused on enterprises, organizations, and conspiracy. That said, of course, once again, there are differences. The life of a Special Agent (SA) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) assigned to Indian Country offenses in Montana or New Mexico is a lot more like that of a big city homicide and violent crime detective; the FBI SA assigned to foreign counterintelligence work has a different life; and the SA doing a large insurance fraud case yet a different life altogether. Each federal agency has their own culture, just life each state police agency and each city agency does. It used to be the FBI wanted SA applicants to have at least three years work experience beyond their Bachelors degree, but that can be waived in some ways (having a law degree, fluency in a critical language, etc.). The Bureau of Diplomatic Security (State Department) does law enforcement work (passport fraud etc.) when they are stateside, but spend a lot of their careers overseas; and for every assignment in Paris you are going to spend a couple of tours in Lower Yucksville; man they travel a lot. Similarly, Secret Service travels a lot, very hard on families. Good luck.
     

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