APFT for 16-year-olds

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by FloridaDad, Dec 17, 2010.

  1. FloridaDad

    FloridaDad Member

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    The standards for the APFT are for 17-21 year olds. What standard do they use for high school seniors that went up a grade and are still 16?
     
  2. Marist College ROTC

    Marist College ROTC Member

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    There is no standard for 16 year olds. The 17-21 standard will apply as soon as they turn 17 so be sure that they meet that standard.
     
  3. FloridaDad

    FloridaDad Member

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    So will the board even take account of his physical fitness test? The interviewer didn't see his results and merely asked about his fitness.
     
  4. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    They will. Most likely, they will compare it to the 17-21 age group and apply some discretion for his 1 year age gap. If he can do 42 pushups, 53 situps and run 2 miles in 15:54, he is fine.
     
  5. FloridaDad

    FloridaDad Member

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    Its only a mile run for the PFT.
     
  6. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    My apologies, I forgot you were talking about the scholarship. The real one is 2 miles.
     
  7. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Throw age aside!


    The PFA/T will be a part of his ROTC ranking, and by the time he gets to college he will be in the 17-21 parameters.

    It WOULD be best to have him score in that yr group now as a 16 yo.

    Honestly there is nothing more that cadet leaders who are in charge of PT hate than a cadet who can't perform the PFT.

    PT is run by cadets, and that is their JOB in the det/BN. They are reviewed by the scores of the cadets, cadets who don't perform are viewed by the command as failures, and that means the cadet who can't get them to par also are failures.. A cadet, will receive a world of pain if they are failing. Why? Because the PT cadet instructor knows he/she will be reviewed on those scores and is not about to lose their career goal for them.

    AGAIN, throw the age aside, and aim for the PFT scores needed. If you or he decide to use age as an excuse, come September it will not be pretty. Come Sept. he will be highlighted amongst his peers and AGE doesn't matter.

    I am not saying you are trying to use the age card, but it is important to understand that ROTC in this economy is very competitive and you don't want to give them an ounce of leeway.
     
  8. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    I echo this X10. We had a freshman cadet in my battalion this year that did well on his APFT, minus the run. He was, at the beginning of the semester, 2 and a half minutes slower than the standard. After his 3rd APFT failure, he was put on a 5 day PT program where he was working out 2 and 3 times a day. It doesn't get pretty if you fail. This cadet never had his scholarship activated.

    My suggestion would be, if he is a soon to be freshman cadet, over the summer work to maintain roughly a 210-220 APFT score, so when he reports to his battalion and he takes his first APFT, he has a cushion between the 180 minimum, because his score will most likely drop because he will encounter strict graders and nerves.
     
  9. FloridaDad

    FloridaDad Member

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    The question wasn't would they cut him a break if he couldn't do the APFT, the question was will they even take account of the PFT because of his age.
    The interviewer didn't want to see his PFT scores, he just asked him if he would be ready for the APFT next fall.

    He will be scoring around 250-260 in the APFT based on his current fitness level. I will have him at 72/78/13:00 by next fall, which is enough for a 300 on the APFT.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2010
  10. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    PFT is a small % in the equation when it comes to the WCS. Obviously, your child is academically gifted and at a level that the interviewer felt he was competitive for a scholarship.

    The fact is that he will be 17 when he enters, so yes, they take it into account.

    For those who believe they can get super high scores, unless you are coming from a military lifestyle BEWARE.

    It is really easy to max everything if you take them in parts and not the way that is mandated by the AF. A lot different when it is raining outside or 95 degrees and follow the AF mandate on how to administer the test. In other words, you can do 13 for 2 miles, but make sure that is done after the sit ups and push ups, not just by itself. You need to get him to run at 5 a.m in the bitter cold, or 4 p.m in the stifling humidity so he can adjust to weather. They give that PFT 2x a yr within days of the school semester. He can't predict the weather, so he needs to train for all types of weather.

    Cadets are shocked at their 1st test on how their numbers dropped compared to the PFA they took back in hs. This occurs because the cadets that administer the test are much more strict on the proper form when it comes to counting, elbows locked, amount of time between parts all are done to the Nth degree.

    I am sure you can get hm to the high numbers, but it really is important to make sure everything is done to their regs and stds.

    Our DS hates PT and because he does he has always maxed out his scores. Most dets allow the cadets that max out the opportunity to miss mandatory PT for the AFROTC. YET, there is a double edge sword to that. Since our DS always maxes out, his 1st job in his det was PT instructor, so he still landed up doing PT, but now as an instructor. His current job in the det. because of his scores and attending LDAC is LDAC instructor for C200's which means he has to prepare them for LDAC, which means doing PT.
     
  11. FloridaDad

    FloridaDad Member

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    He is used to 4 hour football practices in the Florida sun, five days a week all summer including holidays. For running I am making him do a 5 mile run in 30 minutes once a week, and two miles with back pack three times a week.

    Thankfully a few months abuse during football practice has made him trainable
     
  12. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    I don't think this thread was intended to be a "my dog can beat up your dog" thread. We understand you are going to prepare your son well and that is awesome, however, understand, his scores will drop. Not a big deal, but its going to happen.
     
  13. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I have an FB player too, and their workouts are insane. However, all I was trying to state to you is you need to train properly.

    Running in 98 degree weather is one thing. Now Run, do the push ups and the pull ups with the required down time between them.

    That is a whole different ball of wax.

    It needs to be done at the military reg. Download CFA instructions and you will be able to help more than you know. If you give 3 minutes between the push ups and the sit ups, but they only give 2 minutes he will do better in the amount he can push out. If he only does a run and no push ups or pull ups prior to the run with the regulated rest time he will do better. I have yet to address what the school considers a push up compared to ROTC. The cadets are very serious about the position of the shoulders, the elbows, body structure and how low they must go. FB coaches are not as intense in HS, all they care about is counting off. There are not enough coaches to go around compared to ROTC instructors.

    My point was follow their regs for the PFT.

    I have to say, I am now curious why they asked this of a football player? It would seem like a no brainer that he is fine regarding physical training.
     
  14. FloridaDad

    FloridaDad Member

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    Which goes back to my original post really: The PMS asked about fitness and stuff, and just told my son be ready for the APFT. He never submitted the PFT scores and the PMS was messing around on the online application. He told my son at the end of the interview his application was complete and ready for the board. He has since done the PFT and submitted the scores just in case.


    So my question is/was two fold: Is the PMS meant to review the PFT score sheet? And do they enter anything regarding fitness online?


    BTW - We have been told by a former President of the AROTC Board that varsity football is very desirable to most board members. I now both his Navy and Army interviews revolved around football talk.
     

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