Application Timeline

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by Canihas, Apr 5, 2012.

  1. Canihas

    Canihas Member

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    Hello,

    I am currently a sophomore at Leslie High School and I was wondering when I start getting involved in the entire application process. I know you aren't supposed to start doing all that good stuff until junior year for most colleges/universities, but I know there are a lot of extra things when it comes the the Naval Academy. I might talk to my counselor after Spring Break, but since my school hasn't really produced any Naval Academy applicants before, she might not be too familiar with the process.

    So could anyone fill me in? I read the "What Are My Chances" FAQ thread, but i just got the names of months. Not years like "by January of your junior year you should have blah blah blah..." I am also confused at most of the acronyms like "BGO" and "NAPS." Google was a good tool, but you can never be too sure. :shake:

    Anyways, I'll appreciate any help i get from you guys.

    Thank you.
     
  2. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    There is nothing specific you need to do before January of your junior year, when you can apply to NASS.

    In the meantime, take the hardest science and math courses that you can comfortably handle, and study hard. Try to be a varsity athlete. Find a couple of ECAs in which you can become more involved and then find ways to lead them.

    BGO = Blue & Gold Officer. These are often (but not always) alums or others who help USNA with the admissions process. They are assigned by school. Ask your counselor if he/she knows who your BGO is. That person can be a great resource.

    NAPS -- Naval Academy Prep School. You go for one year and the school helps people be more academically prepared for USNA. People who apply to USNA and are deemed not academically qualified are automatically considered for NAPS. It is also where most prior enlisted headed to USNA go for a year of academic and military transition.

    There is a list of acronyms. I'm sure someone will post the link.:smile:
     
  3. craeder

    craeder Member

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    Here is the list of acronyms -- http://www.serviceacademyforums.com/showthread.php?t=11568

    Would also suggest you read back through a few weeks/months of these posts -- someone asked about a "checklist" recently and was referred to various books out there about applying to USNA. My DS (dear son) found this one very helpful by Sue Ross -- http://www.amazon.com/The-Naval-Academy-Candidate-Book/dp/0979794315

    You could also look at the other SAs (service academies) on this forum -- USAFA, USMA etc. -- to see if anyone asked a similar question, as the processes will be fairly similar.

    Good luck!
     
  4. Canihas

    Canihas Member

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    Just bumping this thread to tell everyone that I have received an offer of appointment for the C/O 2018!

    This is truly a dream come true. Many things were working against me; neither of my parents attended college, let alone a prestigious institution like the Naval Academy! Along with that, my counselors provided little help; my school had only produced one chAir Force cadet years ago. I am excited to admit that I received an OOA almost completely on my own!

    A few words of advice for those of whom that are seeking or will seek admission:

    TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE! Think of the application deadline as merely the latest date of which you can turn it in to NOT get accepted. I submitted my NASS application (more on that later) the morning it opened up. I started my official application as soon as it opened up and had everything (excluding the math/english/counselor recommendations and the BGO interview) in before school even started. Same with the DoDMERB exam; I had it done and was medically qualified during the summer. My BGO was absolutely surprised when I told him that I had everything done. Apparently no one in his area had as much things done as I did.


    ATTEND NAVAL ACADEMY SUMMER SEMINAR! It is a 5 day long program in the summer for kids who have just finished their junior year. You will have a LITTLE taste of what life is like there.

    If you are from an area where the military, let alone the Navy, has little presence (like Michigan!), I cannot emphasize how important NASS is to the application process. It really helps you get your foot in the door and will familiarize you with the military lifestyle if you unfortunately have not already. APPLY AS SOON AS IT OPENS UP! The official USNA Facebook page said that around 18,000 kids applied. Only 2550 will be able to go.

    If all goes well at this seminar, it will serve as a great motivating tool. I made many friends and I still keep in contact with them today, all of them encouraged me through the process and I reciprocated those words of encouragement as well.


    GET IN SHAPE FOR NASS! At NASS, you will take the candidate fitness assessment, or CFA. The CFA will determine whether or not you meet the physical fitness aspects of USNA. If you do well on it, all you have to worry about after that are the things that involve typing on a computer and sitting in a chair and talking.


    I hardly have as much academic and leadership credentials as some of the kids on this site. I believe that all of these things I did have led me to receive a LOA and subsequently the OOA.


    July 1st could not come any faster.


    Go Navy, beat Army!
     
  5. 1964BGO

    1964BGO Member

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    There are things you can start doing as early as 9th or 10th grade to position you for any university as well as the service academies. One of the first things to do is meet with your school's college placement counselor about your plans and start working out your critical courses for the rest of your time in high school. One of the things you will find in these forums is a surprisingly large number of prospects who are having problems squeezing in all the math and science courses they really should take, especially if they intend to pursue a Bachelor of Science. For the service academies you really need to take the following courses: algebra II, geometry, trigonometry, pre-calculus, calculus, chemistry with lab, physics, and a very rigorous grammar course. It would be beneficial if your calculus, chemistry, and physics courses are AP and that you take the exams as they can help you validate courses at USNA. If you lay out your course of study early, you can squeeze in all of these courses without overloading.

    I personally also strongly feel sophomores should start studying for and taking the SAT and/or ACT exams; my mantra is "familiarity breeds better scores." I know this is not endorsed by everyone, but pursuing an appointment to one of the service academies is very competitive, and it is my belief that an ACT score of 32 (for example) will be more impressive to the Admissions shop than a 26. Shoot me if I'm wrong, but that is my fervent belief.

    Start searching for ECA's that are compatible with your personal interests and get involved with the objective of becoming an active, productive participant aspiring to leadership roles. It would be good to have a couple of organizations, be they affiliated with school, church, or community. Quality is more important than quantity here; don't overload to the point your academics are undermined - two or three will be adequate if you're being productive. Also look for opportunities to get into some of the leadership programs such as Boys State or Nation, Hugh O'Brien Youth, Eagle Scouts, Civil Air Patrol, Sea Cadets, Young Marines, JROTC, etc.

    Finally, you should be involved in some athletic program! All of the service academies expect their cadets/midshipmen to be physically fit - and more!
    You need to work on a balance of strength, endurance, and agility. Do some lifting, running, pull ups, push ups, crunches in addition to any organized sport.

    Do go to the website(s) of your favored service academies and look for their visitation programs; eg, STEM, NASS, sports camps, etc. You really owe it to yourself to learn early rather that later what you are going to get yourself into if you get selected for an appointment. The Naval Academy's STEM programs are available to young people as early as the summer between their 7th and 8th grades and is a small, highly selective program. Applications for STEM will become available early in January at www.usna.edu/Admissions. For those who are going to complete their junior year in 2014, the Naval Academy Summer Seminar program is likewise small (2250 participants) and very competitive. The application for NASS will open in mid-January also at www.usna.edu/Admissions. Sports camps and some leadership programs are available through the CAMPS selection at www.navysports.com. This may be a better course of action for varsity athletes as you will get to meet and work with some of the coaches. NAVY also have walk-in Admissions briefings available every day except Sunday in the Halsey Fieldhouse just inside Gate ! at the Naval Academy; check the schedule before you head to Annapolis.

    So, there is plenty for any serious prospect to be doing as freshmen and sophomores and you may as well get started after this Christmas break. Best wishes to any of you who decide to pursue this course of action. The process is long, strenuous, competitive, and a great opportunity!
     

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