Applying for Army ROTC without scholarship

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by frenzymando, Oct 17, 2015.

  1. frenzymando

    frenzymando Banned

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    I'm doing the application for an Army ROTC scholarship but it's asking me to choose what my major is and I'm not certain what I would like to major in yet. I don't need an Army ROTC scholarship because I can already get full ride academic scholarships at the schools I am looking at. I really want to do ROTC(if I don't get into a service academy) but I also want to be able to choose my major. How do I apply for Army ROTC without the scholarship? If I don't get a scholarship I can major in anything I want, right?

    Sorry if this is a really dumb question but when I Google "apply for Army ROTC" only the scholarship application shows up.
     
  2. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Just a dad

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    Contact the AROTC ROO at the college of your choice and express your interest in becoming a college programmer. My DS did this and is thriving as a MS -I and will likely contract next year.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2015
  3. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    In general, army doesn't care what your major is, although it is slowly moving in that direction. Also, you can usually change your major once as long as you can still graduate on time. I'm sure people more expert on AROTC than I will chime in to correct me if I'm wrong.

    That being said, if you have a ticket for a full ride anyway, doing ROTC as a college programmer could be the wise choice. Here's why: If you are on scholarship and leave ROTC on or after the first day of your sophomore year, then you will need to repay the tuition money you have received so far, Some people who were discharged late in their senior year have had to repay $400,000+. Regular college scholarships do not require such repayment.
     
  4. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    The reason you only find scholarship information when you search "apply" is because you don't "apply" to enroll in Army ROTC class in college. You enroll in the class. If you want to enroll the best way to get information is to contact the enrollment officer (ROO) at the college/Battalion you are interested in.

    Don't get too hung up on having to stick to a major.

    On another note...could someone explain to me what a "college programmer" is...I've never heard that term used with regards to Army ROTC except here on this discussion board.
     
  5. Wilco

    Wilco Member

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    From one of the NROTC websites. Kinnem and others can clarify more.

    College Program

    The college program allows students to join NROTC without applying for an NROTC National Scholarship. Once they are college programmers, they can take one of two routes:

    Route 1
    College programmers are ranked amongst their peers within the NROTC unit. Their rankings are based on military aptitude and academic grades. High performers may be offered NROTC scholarships called CNET controlled or Leadership Scholarships. The NROTC college programmer is only competing with other students locally as opposed to nationally under the NROTC National Scholarship application process. The disadvantage is that no monetary benefits are provided for the first year during the ranking process.

    Route 2
    Members under this program can earn a commission without earning a scholarship. If a college programmer has not been offered a CNET controlled or Leadership Scholarships by the end of their sophomore year and completion of four Naval Science Courses; the NROTC staff will submit them for "Advanced Standing" to the Chief of Naval Education and Training (CNET). If not accepted by CNET, the member is removed from the NROTC program. If accepted, the member will remain in the NROTC program and earn a monthly stipend of $350 a month. Upon graduation, the member will receive a commission in the US Navy or Marine Corps.
     
  6. bman

    bman Member

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    "College Programmer" is a Navy ROTC term for someone in the first two years of the program who is not on scholarship and thus not contracted. If they are approved to continue in the program for the final two years without a scholarship they sign a contract with the Navy at that point and they are then in "Advanced Standing".
     
  7. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Just a dad

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    Honestly Scott, I think it is primarily a NROTC slang term used for any non scholarship freshman enrolee. Technically a freshman and sophomore can participate in NROTC "college program" but must compete for advanced standing to continue beyond.

    I was being loose with the term college programmer as relating to AROTC.

    "NROTC College Program is defined here:
    http://www.nrotc.navy.mil/scholarships.aspx
     
  8. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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  9. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    We call them enrolled Cadets.

    I'm kind of a stickler for correct language when explaining the program, hence my question. Calling someone a "college programer" sounds kind of formal. For me someone in that status (taking the class without a contract or scholarship) could be anywhere along the spectrum from taking the class for fun and an easy credit to striving to for a scholarship and commission. And getting back to the OPs original question...no need to apply, just enroll.

    The other learning point here is that each branch's ROTC program is more different than we think.
     
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