Are the following OTC drugs?

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by militaryfamily, Jun 25, 2011.

  1. militaryfamily

    militaryfamily Member

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    I have read in the packet no OTC drugs can be taken for plebe summer but what about the hydrocortisone 1% cream for say leg chaffing or aquaphor ointment for lips......are any creams allowed for basic first aid? (Naval Academy) So what type of first aid creams/bandaids, etc...can we pack so they have stuff handy? Any suggestions of what may be helpful to include for feet, blisters, etc?

    Thanks.........GO NAVY!
     
  2. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    First, bring LESS on I-Day. Your parents/friends/relatives can send stuff later.

    Second, you can buy a lot of stuff at the Midstore.

    Third, if you need medical attention, it and any needed meds will be provided free of charge.
     
  3. Snow18

    Snow18 Member

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    I didnt see that rule in the booklet. My mom was told by the parents club to send Aleve or Tylenol in the first care package. Should I tell her not to?
     
  4. PreMed@Usna

    PreMed@Usna Member

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    Just have the creams sent in the first care package, it will simplify the I day process, and will ensure that they have the stuff asap. Anything they bring with them will be taken away including anything told by the ptr to bring like the white crew necks or underwear.

    And as a side note, acetaminophen (Tylenol) or naproxen (aleve) are overly powerful for any ache or pain a plebe will experience. They also have a host of side effects that really make them not worthwhile. There is a reason navy only prescribes ibuprofen (advil) to midshipmen for day to day joint or muscle pain. Just something to keep in mind.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2011
  5. militaryfamily

    militaryfamily Member

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    Understand the need for less on Iday but the question is "is the hydrocortizone and the lip ointment allowed"? I don't want to send it if they will be taken away from the care package(s) and/or on Iday. If anyone knows for sure?



    Thanks!


    ps. for the person that didn't see the info in the packed regarding motrin, aleve, tylenol, etc.... look under MEDICATIONS and it says take "none".

    Have a great day and for those who haven't arrived Annapolis and DC weather has been good!
     
  6. MJOmom

    MJOmom Member

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    over the summer the detailers are supposed to pay attention to how much the plebes hurt (even though it won't seem like it) ... drugs that mask/seemingly ease pain were discouraged my son's year for a host of reasons. If something hurts, it should be looked at by a medical person and evaluated ... before it morphs into something more serious. Being tough is good, but not if it takes drugs to do it ...
    Numerous plebes end up on cruches and on the bleachers ...
     
  7. 2012mom?

    2012mom? Member

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    MJOmom has it exactly right. This year's detailers are currently being briefed on just about every aspect of being a good squad leader/platoon leader/company commander. A huge part of those positions is how to take care of "their" Plebes.

    If a squad leader doesn't know that a Plebe is "broken," he/she can't help that Plebe to get "fixed." For that reason:

    - NO medications that aren't known/approved. As MJOmom says, if a squad leader doesn't know what's happening, lots of bad things are more likely to happen. Here are just two examples:
    - If a Plebe is truly hurt and tries to "tough it out," the injury will probably become much worse
    - If a Plebe is on unknown meds and has an injury - maybe gets knocked out - they may accidentally be given meds that have seriously bad interactions with the unknown meds.

    - Limits on acceptable food items in goody boxes. If a Plebe is snacking on junk food, they may not eat properly, and their performance will suffer. Squad leaders also need to be aware of "their" Plebes' weight gain/loss in case things start to go awry.

    Once Plebe Summer is over, these sorts of restrictions go away. Until then, TRUST YOUR SQUAD LEADER!!! He/she will yell at you and order you around just like Mom and Dad on a bad day - until you and your squad mates all "get it" and start to perform like Midshipmen.
     
  8. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    Not sure where you got that info from, but that isn't medically correct. Ibuprofen has a whole set of side effects as well (stomach ulcers and bleeding for example). A physician will use whatever medication fits the patient the best (and they are the most comfortable with). For Navy physicians we try to prescribe medications that are on a basic core formulary. All 3 of those medications are on the BCF; however, personally I use tylenol more for fevers/headaches, naproxen for someone who I like twice a day dosing in (or they've had motrin already and I want something different), and motrin as my first line anti-inflammatory medication for 90% of the ailments I would see in a sick call setting.
     

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