Army ROTC PT Test

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by aznpow3r, Jul 25, 2012.

  1. aznpow3r

    aznpow3r New Member

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    Out of all the incoming freshman that initially go into the Army ROTC program, how many of those usually MAX OUT with a 300+ score on their first try? I understand it depends on each battalion, but any feedback would be nice.


    Thank you!
     
  2. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Not a lot, A lot, Just a few, A bunch.

    It doesn't depend on the battalion, it depends on the cadet. One thing you will learn quickly, be less concerned about how other cadets are doing and more concerned about how you are doing.

    Don't worry about other's score, just do your best.
     
  3. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    +1, Jcleppe

    Not that it really matters, since it's an individual effort, but in my battalion, 0.

    It's not 0 because they don't show up in shape or their not allowed to max the first one. It's because your HS coach isn't an infantry E-7 (or another MOS/paygrade cadre member). Their standards for correct form are different (the E-7 is going to be right). It's going to take an adjustment period for freshmen to see what a real pushup/situp is and commit that to muscle memory.

    Also, you may be used to running on a track and being used to 400m splits. My battalion doesn't use a track. It's not entirely flat either. It's also not exactly 2 miles, it's slightly longer. Adapt.

    Show up and give your best. I'm not advocating only meeting minimums, but a 180 will get your scholarship turned on. From there you can use the tools available to you (PT, remedial PT, extra help) to work towards a 300.
     
  4. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    +1 to both Jcleppe and -Bull-'s comments, especially -Bull-'s comment about coaches in HS. If you are not practicing the correct form to the exact parameters you will be wasting your physical energy during the PFT. Simply because for every push-up or sit-up done improperly exerts strain on you and they won't count it.

    FWIW make sure you are practicing in all types of weather. Run when it is 90 degrees and 95% humidity because that may be what the weather is like on the day of the test. Run when it's spitting rain, because that might be the weather too.

    No good will be gained if you only run at 6 p.m. when it is cooler and only on dry days.
     
  5. dlee96

    dlee96 Member

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    just practice every night before bed or when you have time. I enjoy doing a 2 mile run, 50 pushups x3, 50 situps x3, and 10 pullups x3 before bed. this should be more than enough to get you a good score(270-280+ maybe)
     
  6. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    A better question would be, How many MS1's reach a score of 300+ by the end of the freshman year.

    For my sos'n battalion last years MS1 class had 1 cadet at 300 the beginning of school and 2 cadets by the end of the year. That was a bit unusual, it doesn't happen every year, it depends on the cadets.

    Every battalion has different PT workouts, they have different conditions where they train and run. Some battalions have forced remedial if you fall below 240, some if you fall below 280 (90 in each section).

    One of the main things to understand is that those that do reach 300+ do not get there by just going to the scheduled PT, these cadets work out on their own, they run extra miles, PT alone will not get you to the top of the APFT ladder.
     
  7. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    No offense dlee96, but did you miss -Bull-'s post?
    You can do that every night until the cows come home, but if the form is incorrect you are boffed!

    I am 47 and I can do all of that, but that doesn't mean I will pass. It just means I can do it to my standards, not necessarily theirs.

    I am not trying to flame you, but I think you have it wrong. I am too lazy to find the thread, but last Aug/Sept time frame there was a thread about how many AROTC cadets didn't pass. Ohio parent, and I think Jcleppe can assist regarding this thread.
     
  8. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    The answer to that comment.....There were a lot that did not pass the APFT when they got to school. Some of these were 4 year scholarship cadets that were now unable to contract and did not receive any of the scholarship funds. Most of those that did not pass was due to not doing the PU's and SU's to regulation standards. My son's battalion had 2 scholarship cadets that did not pass, both have left the program, both had recorded 60+ PU's in one minute on their PFT for the scholarship application, once they had to do them to regulation they could barely do 30 in 2 minutes.

    One thing to keep in mind, when you are taking the APFT they don't stop the watch if your doing the PU's incorrect, they just don't count the ones that aren't correct. This is what it sounds like when they count, 1,2,3,4,4,4,4,4,4,5,5,5,6,7,7,7, and so on. As you can see you have now done 16 PU's but the official count is only 7, you get tired real fast.

    You can always go by a recruiting office and see if they can watch you do both PU's and SU's to make sure you are doing them to regulation.

    Bull had a good suggestion, run in all terrains and weather, your 2 mile run may not be on flat ground.
     
  9. gstudent99

    gstudent99 Member

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    It may even be worse than this, as it was for my son. The evaluator does not have to count out loud. When my son got to 42 in his mind he thought he was free and clear. What he did not know was that the official count was somwhere around 34. As his energy was giving out around mid 50s (accourding to the count in his head) he heard 39 from the evaluator. He had no energy left to get over the minimum count.

    He ultimately passed on a test later in the semester and contracted but it was definately an eye-opener for him. He had to relearn how to do pushups.

    It cost him a couple of months stipend money.
     
  10. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    dlee96,

    If I am correct you are a jr in HS. I get your motivation, BUT if I am correct and you are in HS, esp. a jr., you are harming the OP. JROTC is not ROTC.

    The OP will take your post as you know the system, you don't.
    Your post about working out after -Bull-'s left them with 2 differing opinions.

    You stated to him in your opinion he will get a 270/280, but if I am correct again, you are not in college. How do you know what a 270 is if you have yet to take the AROTC PT? Granted, I have yet to do it, but I know form is everything, not just practicing when you have time.

    I am not trying to attack/hurt/harm/disgrace you. I am trying to educate you that this site is about assisting applicants/candidates/cadets. You want to use your PT regiment as a guide, great! Just let the posters know you are a jr. in hs.

    You would want that for you next yr.
     
  11. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    That's brutal, I would think they would at least count out loud for the first time cadets, luckily the graders are all required to count out loud at my son's battalion.

    I agree though, it can be a real eye opener.
     
  12. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

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    If the PT thing is new for you try and shoot for 250+, I guarantee you will be at least 275 by the end of the year if you put forth the effort to go to every PT.
     
  13. Marist College ROTC

    Marist College ROTC Member

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    I have tested over 100 brand new freshmen at New Cadet Orientation. Only 1 has ever maxed all 3 events. That individual was on the Varsity Track Team and had already completed Basic and AIT as a member of the NY Army National Guard.

    If you think that you are going to max all 3 events you are either overly optimistic are extremely well prepared. If you don't max the first time, focus on your weakest event and seek to improve your score. Either way, good luck.

    In my experience, for males, the most common reason for failure is poor form on push ups. For females, the most common reason for failure is lack of upper body strength resulting in a failing score on push ups, and lack of cardio-vascular endurance resulting in a failing score on the run.
     
  14. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    You can be sure a lot more fail their first APFT than score 300. In fact I would bet there are many battalions where a majority fail the first one. As Bull and Jcleppe have suggested, incorrect form for pushups and situps is a prime cause of failure.

    By the way, if you do 100 pushups and run two miles in 9:30 but fall short of 60 points by one sit-up, then you've failed the test.
     

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