Army ROTC Scholarship PFT

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by bcom, Aug 31, 2010.

  1. bcom

    bcom Member

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    For a male would these scores be passing.

    Situps 62

    pushups 60

    1 mile run 7:54

    Thanks
     
  2. gojack

    gojack ....

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    For a Army PT score calculator go here: <Link>

    Army PT <LINK> is 2 minute sit-ups, 2 minute push-ups and TWO mile run.

    Presidential PT test,<LINK> is 1 minute sit-ups, 1 minute push-ups and ONE mile run.

    Army PT has a passing score (minimum 18/male = 42PU/53SU/15:54)
    Presidential PT test does not.

    Army ROTC only requires a Presidential PT test to apply but - you must pass Army PT your 1st semester.

    All that said, my son did the Presidential PT, turned in a 58/59/5:53 (graded by his track coach)
    The PMS interviewer questioned him on if he was doing the sit-ups/push-ups in correct form.
    He made a major point that correct form is critical.
    Clearly he felt the numbers might be suspect. In hindsight an Army PT with ROTC cadre would have more validity.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2010
  3. AFmonkey

    AFmonkey Member

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    I'm not sure how it works for the AROTC but the PFA for the AFROTC clearly states that a high school official should administer the test. This does not have to be a physical education teacher but a non-physical teacher such as a counselor or principal.
    Surely, this suggests that they trust you and the official to do the test properly. Also, it will become obvious if you did the test properly when it comes to PT later on.
     
  4. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    Bcom: You need to work on running. The APFT is a 2 mile timed run- with a MINIMU of 15:54 to pass so your one mile time of 7:54 if extrapolated to a 2mile pace would leave you with a 61 on that event. That's of course assuming you keep the same pace for your second mile as you did your first which if you aren't used to running at all is not likely (and at that pace I can surmise that you are not a runner) The other two don't look too bad.

    For a scholarship you are going to take the Presidential PFT which is a one minute test for those three events. You won't take an APFT till you get to school, but I don't think that you want to have someone evaluating your scores making the same simple extrapolation for a scholarship that I just did. So- get out on the street and start logging some miles- build in some fartleks and some hills and start getting serious here- you can improve that time pretty fast.

     
  5. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    Meaning no offense to any who have posted their scores, it is highly unlikely that either candidate was using proper form, especially the candidate who did 60 pushups in a minute. It is essentially impossible to use PROPER form and execute said form at a pace exceeding one pushup per second, which would generally be the case in the aforementioned situation because even the best pushup studs will rest for a few seconds after knocking out 45 or 50 perfect pushups. The same is true for situps.

    Be very careful of the form you're using. Arms need to break the 90* plane in the down position. Elbows must be fully locked in the up position. For situps, the base of the neck must pass forward of the base of the spine. That is farther than most people go on a situp.

    Just a thought.
     
  6. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Scout's point also goes back to why so many kids fail the PFT when they get to ROTC. It is not that they are physically unfit, it is they have not been doing it to the military standard. I would suggest to really get the full potential download the CFA for the SA's. It illustrates proper form and proper testing. Here is the AFA CFA instructions https://admissions.usafa.edu/RRS/Online_CFA_2013.pdf

    Take the time to read through it because the fine print exists. For example, candidates may only rest in the up position with fingertips on their shoulders for sit ups. For push ups they can rest in the up position flexing or bowing, but both feet must remain on the ground. Scout is rt, it must be 90 degrees, AND feet can not be more than 12" apart.

    Additionally, it is important that the procedure is followed precisely. If you review it, they actually have an order of events and time down between the events. You need to be as precise as possible, because in the end, you will be required to do this once at your det. Playing loose with the procedure will only hurt you in the end. Our DS last semester was the PT instructor for freshman, and he will be the first to tell you they were rigid regarding proper methods.

    Not only will this hit you at the det., but when you go to FT, they will do it again, and if your det played loose with the rules you can be in deep doo-doo at training...in other words failing the PT. This happened in our DS's FT session, where some failed and were unable to graduate.

    Lastly, I suggest that you do this in extreme weather when you do your practice. You will not be able to predict the weather on the day it is administered at your ROTC det. It could be raining, and that will impact your run. It could be 115 degrees with the heat index and that will make a difference in your scores. It could also be 28 degrees. ROTC cadets take this test 2x a yr...once each semester. Taking the test at 6 pm when the sun is down and temps are lower will not be the same as doing it 7 am when humidity is high and the sun is up.

    Best of luck
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2010
  7. Armydude2012

    Armydude2012 LT

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    I see many new cadets come in that think they can do 100 pushups in 2min Then they are disappointed when they only receive 65-70 points in that event. You need to do Pushups to standard! (ie. when you go to Airborne or Air Assault you will need to be preforming at the standard or else your effort will be wasted and your schools slot will be too). I saw many cadets this summer waste effort on the APFT at Airborne because they couldn't do a proper pushup.

    Our MSG stated that the only way to get better at pushups is to do more pushups!
     
  8. philmont

    philmont Member

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    high school ROTC scholarship

    What are the minimum fitness test passing scores for the army ROTC 4 year scholarship?
     
  9. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    There are no minimums...eventually you will be asked to pass an APFT, but you have to get a scholarship and get into college first.

    If you can do 35 pushups, 45 situps, and run 1 mile in around 7:30 you will set yourself apart from most of your peers and demonstrate that you are fit enough to warrent an Army ROTC scholarship. Those scores are just a swag, The board members just want to see that you aren't a slug.

    The real fun will start when you show up in the fall to validate your scholarship, because if you aren't ready to pass the APFT you might be paying for a college semester you can't afford.

    http://goldenknightbattalion.wordpress.com/2010/02/10/the-dreaded-pt-test/
     
  10. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Clarkson is correct. The important thing is to get the scholarship AND to do the form properly. So many cadets believe because the coach or the PE instructor administered the test they did the correct form to only get to ROTC and find out...WRONG!

    The dets will be sticklers when giving the PFT.

    You should never stop working out between now and the 1st day at the det. Our DS didn't and what it meant for him at his det. was he passed the PFT with a very high score, thus, he didn't have mandatory PT his 1st semester. (he is AFROTC, so it could be different). He did have to hand in a PT log, but it was at his leisure when he did PT, not O-dark thirty.

    It also meant he also got some other perks.

    1. He became a PT instructor for ROTC as a job as a freshman (spring)
    2. The entire det were the opening runners for the Susan G Kohlman foundation and he was selected to carry their flag.

    Not biggies in any means, but you will understand later on your ROTC involvement may be your make or break when it comes to career decisions as a C300.

    PT, ESPECIALLY in the Army is not where you should set sights on the mins. This is somewhere you have complete PHYSICAL control over. Not saying everyone will max, just saying, you should not settle for a bar to be at a level of just jumping over.

    I say the Army regarding PT, because everyone knows ADAF thinks PT is a round of golf and lifting a beer afterwards or going to the base pool with the kids and doing a belly flop! :shake:
     
  11. DougBetsy

    DougBetsy Member

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    LOL, Pima.
     
  12. goaliedad

    goaliedad Parent

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    Funny, because those are almost identical to goaliegirl's results and she ended up with a campus scholarship. :eek:
     
  13. uniform 419

    uniform 419 GMU CDT

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    Thats nice to hear, I was starting to get stressed out over my recent PFT scores (33 push-ups, 52 sit-ups, 7:12 mile), this definately calmed my nerves.
     
  14. educateme

    educateme Member

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    My son decided to the Army fitness test for his ROTC scholarship application. He told me that he was advised by the PMS of the local flagship state U, whom he met in a local track competition, that passing the Army fitness test impresses the selection board members.

    This PMS asked my son (during the break) to show he is doing his sit ups and push ups, and pointed out that the way he was doing the sit ups was wrong. When the PMS made my son do sit ups in the proper form, much to his surprise, my son realized that he couldn't do as many as he thought he was capable of. The PMS told him how to train to be compliant with the Army Fitness test.

    He now made an appointment with this PMS to do an Army Fitness test next week.
     

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