AROTC Scholarship Summer Training

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by MarineCorpsfan15, Mar 18, 2011.

  1. MarineCorpsfan15

    MarineCorpsfan15 Member

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    Hello,
    I have received a four year AROTC scholarship to UCLA, and I will more than likely be accepting this offer. Is there any required or optional training this summer before my freshman year?
    Thanks
     
  2. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    Not usually. My Battalion held a week long orientation before school started that included issuing uniform and gear, basic history of the Army and our unit, first APFT and some other familiarity things.
     
  3. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Great Post Bull, nice to have a cadets point of view.

    I would add just one thing....Run and then Run some more, do push ups and sit ups, a lot of them. Do this for the whole summer so your prepared for your AFPT. Remember you don't get any stipend money and your scholarship does not kick in until you pass the AFPT.
     
  4. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    What did someone from you new Battalion tell you about Summer training??? I could tell you that there is no summer requirement for new cadets at the Golden Knight Battalion at Clarkson, but that wouldn't help you. I could tell you that I travel around New York state during the summer giving PT tests in various locations to allow my future cadets the opportunity to be ready on contracting day to raise their right hand, but I don't know if anyone from UCLA does the same thing. Thanks for asking the question, but the best place to find out is from your new Battalion.

    Congrats and good luck!!
     
  5. paradoxer

    paradoxer Member

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    Interesting

    So if you live close enough and the ROO is amazing and will test you during the summer you could actually pass the PT test before you come to school? How early in the summer is too early? Could you do this during a summer orientation session? Interesting idea.
     
  6. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    I just know that's the way I do it...alot of schools do it during the first day or first week of school, but I like to get it done ASAP. Since most of my scholarship winners failed the first one, it was good that that wasn't on contracting day. My goal is to have the max number of cadets raising their right hand and taking the oath on day one. I usually schedule these for late July or early August. Since most of my winners are from New York I usually do a map analyses and find a couple central locations I can have my winners come to.
     
  7. paradoxer

    paradoxer Member

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    Failed?

    Most fail the first time they take the test? DS hockey player never failed anything physical but having said that the MOST comment has piqued my curiosity. Why do they fail? Help us all out on this one.
     
  8. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    I'm sure Carksonarmy will chime in on this as well, but I can give you a perspective my son told us.

    Most applicants took the PFT for the physical test, they had a coach or PE instructor administer the test.

    They would run a 7:00 plus mile and figure if they just double that for 2 miles they will pass the run portion of the AFPT. They don't realize that you can't just double your time, you have to run the second mile at the same pace, a pace that probably wore them out just doing the first mile.

    They do 40 to 50 push ups in one minute and figure they are set given that they will have 2 minutes. What they don't realize is that the coach or PE instructor counted every push up regardless of form. When they take the AFPT and start the push ups and hear the Seargent saying 1,2,3,4,4,4,4,4, it means they are not doing the push up correctly and they are not getting them counted. They are very picky on form, don't do it right and it won't be counted. My son said that when they were giving AFPT tests to the freshman at the beginning of the year, a lot of them were bragging about how many push ups they did on the PFT, some said 70 plus in one Minute. They found out quick that doing them with the correct form is very hard, he said most of them failed the first time.

    Sit ups were not as much of an issue, except they do watch form and if you don't slap your back on the ground each time they do not count. The sit ups for the PFT are easier.

    My son took the AFPT the week before he started his senior year in high school at his #1 choice school, just to get an idea of how hard it would be, he scored 247, he does have a brother that is a MS3 at the school so he knew the regulations which helped him train the right way.

    You can check with your local recruiting station, there may be someone there that will test your son from time to time to make sure he is doing everything correct.

    The last big tip....RUN...Then RUN some more. Try and do road runs of 3 to 4 miles at least 5 days a week. This will get him ready for the 2 mile run and get closer to the max points given for 13:00 min.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2011
  9. patentesq

    patentesq Parent

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    Jcleppe, you mean pre-cadets this summer can't just record the time it takes them to run 10 feet (the distance from the refrigerator in the kitchen and the remote control in the living room) and multiply that number times 1056 to calculate their 2-mile distance time? :smile:
     
  10. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Hey, that's what I did before I started, worked for me. Except we didn't have a remote control for the TV...Got my work out getting up to change the channels....Dang I'm OLD!!
     
  11. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    I'm pretty sure it's been said in other threads, but the main reason is they aren't prepared for the test environment and grading standards. There are set time limits for each event and between each event. Additionally, most HS winners think just because you bend your arms, you do a push up. So when they report to pass their first APFT, they are surprised to see what they thought was 60 pushups, turn out to be 37 or so. Thats why it is stressed to start getting into shape before and why cadets on the board advise that your PT score will drop when you report.
     
  12. MarineCorpsfan15

    MarineCorpsfan15 Member

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    Awesome. Thanks for the insight/info everyone. I've played football and I currently in baseball... in addition to all this I have been running long distance and working out hard. I am in pretty good shape right now, and ive been focusing a lot on the push ups and sit ups. So we'll see...
     
  13. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    http://goldenknightbattalion.wordpress.com/2010/02/10/the-dreaded-pt-test/

    A couple things get them...Have never actually run two miles (as stated above), form for the sit up is different than what they have been doing or what they were tested on in the PFT, improper form (as stated above). I think the biggest thing that gets them is lack of preparation and over confidence. When I arrive to administer a PT test, one of the first things I ask is "when was the last time you ran 2 miles?". Can't tell you how many times I hear "never" or "it's been a while". If you aren't self testing yourself every couple weeks, and having someone actually look at your form you will struggle. Don't focus on maximums and impressing anyone now. Focus on 42 perfect pushups, 53 perfect situps, and two miles in under 15:54. I don't care how many pullups you can do, or how much you bench. Don't care what your batting average is, or if you have a wicked wrist shot (actually, that wrist shot may interest me), so prepare for the test!!! I really need to capture shocked looks I see from an applicant who suddenly realizes that she/he is only going to be able to squeeze out 40 situps, or the applicant that realizes that running after doing two minutes of pushups, and two minutes of situps is harder than they think.
    Hope that helps.
     
  14. paradoxer

    paradoxer Member

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    PE teacher = accountability

    Present PE teacher has DS's class completing 5 PFT's over the course of the semester! He doesn't have a military background but thought it would be a great goal for the class to aim for Army standards. It's doubtful that the push-ups are to the correct standards but still attempting. Definitely run 2 miles, no extrapolating run times. Awards for anyone that can reach perfect score threshholds all 5 times (only one person ever has accomplished this) with no redos allowed. So I suppose I should thank/award PE teacher for assisting DS in training for future goal. Accountability seems to be key, thanks for the insight.
     
  15. Ohio2015Parent

    Ohio2015Parent Member

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    I am shocked to hear that so many are that over confident and end up blowing the APFT. DS has already taken it(last July)he's not a varsity athlete and trained seriously for 4 weeks prior to his test date - scored something like a 210, just made the push/sits and ran 2mi. in 14:20. He googled videos of form and has a friend who already has complete basic, so he works with him still, preparing for next fall and will hopefully be offered some type of scholarship either out of 3/8 or campus based.

    He scores around a 240 when his friend counts him for proper form. Can't believe after going thru the application process, the boards and DoDMERB anyone would let the APFT slide and not bust *** to be ready. DS trains everyday-push/sit & other exercise, runs 3-4 days 2+mi all on his own, no coach, no running buddies - its all his desire to do better.:smile:

    Heads up to the fortunate already with scholarships: be ready, kids like mine are hungry and coming to campus with you in the fall. Use that to stay motivated, you've obviously worked hard so far, don't chance your first semester scholarship for something completely in your control.:thumb:
     
  16. The OC Josh

    The OC Josh Member

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    My Battalion has orientation a couple days before regular orientation starts. But there is no huge time commitment.
    Most of the freshman in my class (including me) failed the PT test the first time as well. It is definitely something to work on. But what should you work on? IF you have a runners body, work on push ups and sit ups. If you have a stockier build, work on the run. Improve your weaknesses.
    Also, nerves are a huge part of the nervousness. You're waking up early, putting on the uniform for the first time, and with a bunch of people you don't know taking a test that can determine your college career. It's nerve wracking. Relax. You can do it.

    Back to recovering from Spring FTX...
     
  17. whsoccerjc21

    whsoccerjc21 Member

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    I've got some questions about training for the running. I usually run 4-6 times a week anywhere from 1.5-4 miles depending on how I'm feeling. My question is, Is it better to focus on longer distances like 4 miles at an okay pace. Or would it be better to work on 2 miles at a great pace? Or would it be even better to alternate the two?
     
  18. patentesq

    patentesq Parent

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    There are a variety of runner theories on this.

    I think there are two things you have to do. First, you have to build up endurance. Second, you have to build up speed/pace. You do the former by running longer distances (3-4 miles). You do the latter by running shorter distances (1-mile). I think you should alternate between the two. You should run a two-mile at least once a week to gauge how you are doing.
     
  19. The OC Josh

    The OC Josh Member

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    In my Battalion, we do sets of short quick runs (400, 800, and 1200 yards) The army actually has time hacks for this depending on what your 2 mile time is. (1:28 for a 13:00, 1:54 for a 16:30) The other days of PT we alternate between a short tempo run(quicker, but shorter) and a longer run. It sounds like you are doing a really good time. I would maybe try to do the Army Time hacks for the short distances.

    An example of the short distance work outs would be
    400, 400, 800, 1200, 400, 800, 400.
    You can always switch up the order and the distances of the run.
    There is a suggested rest time between runs. Take this time to run at a jogging pace.
    Check out the TC 3-22.20
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2011
  20. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    I can give you the workout my son does for his Crosscountry Team and Distance Team practice.

    Day 1
    5 miles easy pace

    Day 2
    Intervals - Push yourself on these
    4ea 400's
    2ea 800's
    4ea 200's

    Day 3
    6 miles easy pace

    Day 4
    4 miles fast pace

    Day 5
    7 miles easy pace

    Day 6
    5 miles medium pace

    Day 7
    Rest

    You will need to work up to that mileage, once you are comfortable with the pace and distance increase the mileage unti you are running between 30 and 40 miles per week.

    Obviously you will not need to do this much training to just pass the test but if you keep to this schedule you will better then max the run.
     

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