Arresting Cable Parting on Eisenhower in Mar 2016

Discussion in 'Life After the Academy' started by Physicsguru, Jul 9, 2016.

  1. Physicsguru

    Physicsguru Member

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  2. BTCS/USN

    BTCS/USN Member

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    True that! Outstanding recovery by the AC on that flight.
     
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  3. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    Great recovery but I think crew need a change of shorts after that. I think they hit full power for a moment right before arrest on deck in case this happens? Orbit and go around is not what I want to hear. Disappearing over the bow can't be good.
     
  4. Physicsguru

    Physicsguru Member

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    Yes, once the wire is caught, the pilot goes to full military (100 % no burners) and hold it there until the spotter signals to cut power.
     
  5. Hurricane12

    Hurricane12 USNA 2012

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    I might be wrong but I think E2s don't, only jets do due to a slower engine response.
     
  6. Physicsguru

    Physicsguru Member

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    Possible, as I'm a P-3 guy. You can bet those guys, though, bent the throttles as it went off the deck!
     
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  7. NTWLF ONE

    NTWLF ONE Member

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    I have a lot of hours and traps in the "Hummer" and even though the engines turn at 100 percent RPM and thrust increases/decreases with propeller pitch, we still went to MIL power in the wires and waited for the "yellow shirt" to give us the "throttle back" hand signal. I never flew the eight bladed propeller version at the ship, but I don't believe there was a change in CVN procedures with the introduction of the NP airplanes.

    That was really close to a ditch, underwater egress with the HABD bottle and a cold swim. If you look closely, you can see a little water spray off the main landing gear as they climb away. Unbelievable... From the article, there was a crew of three on board, so they were probably doing Carrier Qualifications and were light weight....and, although the E-2 has a lot of excess power down on the deck....each engine makes 5100 IHP which is a lot for a aircraft that weighs in at around 56,000 lbs, that was still really, really close....

    VAW-115 off the Midway had a similar accident many years ago. The Power Lever lock, which prevents reverse availability during CVN operations jammed on deck, preventing the crew from adding power after a bolter and the aircraft went off the angle deck into the water. I believe 2 of the crew members were lost at sea.

    It's a dangerous business, be safe out there....
     
  8. Wild Blue Yonder

    Wild Blue Yonder Member

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    Yep, the pilots in the US armed forces are just STUDs.
    So glad they are on our side.
     
  9. scoutpilot

    scoutpilot Member

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    Every time I land on a deck, I am thankful for the ability to hover.
     
  10. Philo

    Philo New Member

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    Tangentially, this reminds me of a conversation with a new DCA on the USS MIDWAY - he'd transferred from a CVN. We were watching the PLAT during flight ops. An FA-18 came in a bit high. As they hit the deck, the DCA called "Four wire" to which I replied "Midway's only got three" and sure enough - bolter.
     

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