ARTOC Question

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Lebmug#5, Dec 10, 2015.

  1. Lebmug#5

    Lebmug#5 New Member

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    I was told by a staff member of the ARTOC battalion at a local university that only about 10% of officers commissioned through AROTC receive an Active Duty commission into the regular army and the rest are sent into either the reserves or National Guard. Is this true? Any insight that could be provided would be very helpful.
     
  2. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    Maybe at that battalion 10% enter Active Duty. Nationwide overall around half of AROTC commisioned officers go AD. Some years more, some less.
     
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  3. Lebmug#5

    Lebmug#5 New Member

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    That's great to know. Thanks a lot!
     
  4. AROTC-dad

    AROTC-dad Just a dad

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    The better question to ask is what percent of officers commissioned at your battalion receive the component that they requested? (AD vs NG/R)
     
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  5. clarksonarmy

    clarksonarmy Recruiting Operations Officer at Clarkson Army

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    Stop...before we start spinning...What that person was talking about was an "RA commission". Only about 10% of ROTC commissionees get a commission designated RA. The rest get what is called a USAR commission. This has nothing to do with whether you get active duty or reserves. It will have very little impact on your career or future prospects. You'll still be a second lieutenant in the Army no matter what flavor of commission you get.

    I would also say that whether you get active or reserves in 4+ years has very little to do with what Battalion you are in (unless you are at an SMC)...it has a lot more to do with how well you do academically, how fit you are, how well you take standardized tests, and how active you are in the ROTC program.

    I would recommend you put very little weight into the 10% statement.
     
    AROTC-dad likes this.

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