Asthma DQ, Waivers?, Waiver guidelines btwn Service Academies?

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by cmk723590, Feb 11, 2013.

  1. cmk723590

    cmk723590 New Member

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    Hello
    I have a question regarding Asthma. Based on guidelines for DoDMERB I understand my current condition will result in a DQ. My question is whether there is a chance I will be able to get a waiver and also do the guidelines for asthma waivers differ much (if at all) between the different U.S. Service Academies. Here is my situation. I was diagnosed with Asthma when I was approximately 5 years old. Since then I have been on some type of daily prescription medications to prevent any asthma flare ups. I feel my Asthma is very well controlled with the use of daily meds and it has never prevented my regular, successful participation in physically demanding sports like Football, Rugby, Swimming and Baseball. I have not had any significant issues with my Asthma in over 5 years. I believe the answer to question #1 and #2 is yes but I would like to confirm if possible.
    #1. Is the diagnosis of asthma over the age of 13 considered a DQ?
    #2. Is the use of daily Rx Meds to manage asthma considered a DQ?
    #3. And if so is there any chance of getting a waiver?
    #4. And if so do the guidelines/rules for asthma waivers differ between USSA?
    FYI, I am applying for the USNA, USMMA and the USCGA.
     
  2. goaltoserve

    goaltoserve Member

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    I believe your answers are
    1.YES
    2.YES
    3. There is always a chance.
    4. I've read that there are some differences and that USNA is the most difficult, but I have no proof.

    Having asthma is difficult even if well controlled, but that does not mean you won't succeed in getting a waiver. Good luck!
     
  3. Spud

    Spud BGO

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    I hate to rain on a dream but you ask "what's my chances" and I will wager money it is zero to none. It is not because you are not in superb physical shape as I am sure you are. As you know, Olympic medal winners have competed with controlled asthma and it is not whether you can hack the sports and physical stress of plebe year as you certainly could. In fact, you could play Navy football and go out for Cross Country just to stay in shape very handily. That is not the problem. The Navy knows that someday you will be aboard a ship or a sub with a fire and boiling black smoke will fill your compartment. Guys with healthy lungs are going to be turned into choking, crying babies and you, the officer in charge, will be already be suffocated by your own lungs. No meds can can save you in that very common event at sea.

    You have a lot going for you, I am sure, but this and firefighting, obviously, are not the roads you want to be on. Good luck to you in any case.
     
  4. GoArmyBeatNavy

    GoArmyBeatNavy Member

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    I am sorry to have to provide you this information. Your post seemed well written and sincere.

    From the Army side, your continued use of medication to control your diagnosis of asthma would most likely result in your being medically disqualified and also not receiving a waiver.

    Army Regulation (AR) 40-501, paragraph 2-23 states:
    Use of any prescription medications to control a medical condition is usually a disqualifier because of possibility of service in remote places. For example, steroidal treatments for dermatitis and eczema.

    Still, all they can tell you is no. Apply knowing full well the chances and it might work out. I understand that the application process is lengthy, can incur costs, and requires a significant time requirement, so you have to weight that as well.
     
  5. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    You will never know the official answer unless you apply; however, you need a strong, solid back-up plan.

    The continued need for medications is very likely going to be a no-go. Unfortunately the military can't have people deployed to austere environments who require medications that if unable to get may cause them serious harm.

    If it is what you have always wanted there is no harm in applying, but please go in with a solid plan for another school.
     
  6. Navy4ever

    Navy4ever Member

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    My DS was initially DQ'd and we requested a waiver. He was given a waiver after he took a methocholine challenge test and it was determined he didn't have asthma.

    That may be an option for you if you have not used meds to control asthma for the last 5 years. Not a good idea if meds are used to control the asthma on a daily basis!!
     
  7. LisaP

    LisaP New Member

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    My daughter just received a disqualification for her asthma waiver. We'd already submitted a clear/normal function pulmonology test and a letter from her doctor stating that she does NOT have asthma. Did you get the methocholine challenge on your own or did MEPS requested it.

    Since her DQ letter didn't state temporary or permanent nor did they request any further documentation, I'm planning to request more information. So hopefully we can get this overturned.
     
  8. Lcwick

    Lcwick PrayingforWP

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    We had my DS do the Methocholine Challenge Test before he even applied. Once he applied and went through DodMerb we sent the results in with his physical forms. He got a remedial only because for some reason they did not receive the Methocholine Challenge results. We faxed them right over and he received a waiver that day. The Methocholine Challenge is a definitive test for asthma but I have learned that each case is viewed as it's own, so be careful not to compare results between applicants. I would advise you to have the Methocholine Challenge done if you are to pursue a waiver for asthma.
     
  9. keydet2016

    keydet2016 Member

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    In my personal experience, USNA and NROTC were the toughest. I got medically DQ'd by them but army ROTC granted my waiver and now I'm on scholarship for army at an smc. (Vmi) So in my personal experience... Go army!
     
  10. keydet2016

    keydet2016 Member

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    Also, I took the pulmonary function test and tested well. And I hadn't used my meds since I was "diagnosed" at age 15.
     
  11. LisaP

    LisaP New Member

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    She's IN!!

    After some diligent efforts by her recruiter and questioning the reasons behind my daughter's disqualification for asthma... they reversed the DQ and she's IN!
    WE ARE SO THANKFUL!!

    Our recruiter got the biggest box of cookies EVER!
     

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