Asthma Help!

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by skier, Jan 22, 2014.

  1. skier

    skier Member

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    I just found out that I was diagnosed with exercise induced asthma at the age of twelve. They gave me an inhaler but I have never used it. I have never had any problems with it (I run varsity track and cross country). I am very worried about this. Is there a test that they can do to see if I really have it?

    Thanks,
    AM
     
  2. Jspar16

    Jspar16 Member

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    I had the exact same issue. Be sure in your DoDMERB questionnaire to say you haven't had any issues in years. If I were you, I would also check your medical records to see exactly what they say because they may ask for your records. I DID tell them I had asthma, but it wasn't a big issue since I last had troubles over 4 years ago. If you have had issues within the last 4 years, then tell em and get a waiver for it.

    Alternatively, you could not mention it at all and get away with it. That's what I was advised to do. But if they ask for your records and they see it, you could be in trouble. Good luck!
     
  3. CrazyHorse

    CrazyHorse Member

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    I would document all your Track and Crosscountry acomplishments (trophies, awards, Pictures...) as far back as you can in powerpoint and have it ready to submit if neccassary.

    This is similar to what our DS went through..
     
  4. martinjj

    martinjj Member

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    Skier - our DS had a similar problem with asthma and was initially DQ'd by DodMERB. We went back to his pediatrician, who ran a spirometry test, wrote a letter to DoDMERB with the results and her opinion that DS no longer had asthma. We did not wait for USNA to ask for a waiver. One day after receiving the letter from Dr., DoDMERB changed status to "qualified". I suggest being totally honest on medical history, and then work to clear up any difficulties. There are also more challenging medical tests that can be done (metacholine challenge test?) for asthma, but DS did not need to go that route. Best of Luck, and don't despair!
     
  5. buff81

    buff81 Moderator

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    Moving this to the DoDMERB forum.
     
  6. Ex.BT.USN

    Ex.BT.USN Member

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    A Few Things

    skier,

    1st. Most important - "Remember the Honor Code."

    2nd. When your filling out your applications no matter what remember what is first and most important.

    3rd. "Diagnosed with exercise induced asthma at the age of twelve." This is your start ---- it was before 13.

    4th. +1 to martinjj - I would like to add to this and say that "IF" your parents are willing to pay see a pulmonology specialist. if you can find one that works within the DoDMERB network even better. Passing the spirometry test would be an excellent start adding in a specialist adds weight in a letter to DoDMERB.

    My DS was diagnosed at age 8 and like you never used his meds. To that end that does not matter what he accomplished in sports. What it comes down to is the spirometry test and quite possibly the another test (forgot the name, watch for someone adding that info).

    I took the suggestion of another parent. I got my sons medical records organized, took him to the pulmonology specialist (he also worked with the military), he passed the spirometry test, got a letter from the specialist and was expecting him to get DQ'ed. in the end all they asked for was copies of his medical records and he was qualified.

    All cases are different...

    Remember the Honor Code!!
     
  7. UndeadPoet

    UndeadPoet DS - AROTC/AFROTC Winner

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    +1 EX.BT.USN - Skier, I'm sure others can speak more knowledgeably about this, but I believe that even if you never took the meds, never had an issue, it was a misdiagnosis, etc., if it comes up later on, e.g. maybe the academy needs a copy of your medical history for some obscure reason, and you never disclosed it up front, they can DQ you then. I know of someone's DS who was at USNA on day 1 and was sent home DQ'd onsite because of an inhaler he had in his kit. He had never used or needed it, but it had been prescribed at some point in the past for him and he did not disclose it.

    I know there are applicants who don't disclose things they probably should (and potentially "get away with it"), but I agree with EX.BT.USN regarding the "honor code." Also, when in doubt, disclose. If it is not an issue, then it can easily be remedied. If you don't disclose it and it is discovered, it suddenly seems like a big issue, and actually becomes an even bigger, different issue.

    Just my 2 cents...
     
  8. ca2midwestmom

    ca2midwestmom Member

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    Looks like you are a junior, so you have some time. You may just have to go through the DoDMERB process, but being prepared will help (especially with the anxiety).

    My DS was diagnosed with asthma before age 1, but didn't have a problem after age 13. (Varsity swimmer now, it was never exercise-induced; it was always related to viruses/getting a cold.) He disclosed everything on his medical, even the fact that he was prescribed an inhaler at age 16 due to swimming in a new pool that we believe had a chlorine issue. Again, all of that was listed on his DoDMERB medical forms. He was not DQ'd. He was immediately given a remedial and sent to an allergy/asthma specialist for the Methacholine Challenge. He passed and became Qualified.

    So everyone's experience with DoDMERB is a little different, especially related to asthma. Good luck -- don't stress over it too much right now. Control the things you can, and work through the medical issues if/when they come up. You may also want to give your doctor a heads up to your plan to attend a SA and/or ROTC, and talk to him/her about your past asthma history. That way he/she will be aware of it when it comes time for the paperwork.
     
  9. Ex.BT.USN

    Ex.BT.USN Member

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    !! YES !!

    +1 ca2midwestmom...Thank you!!!

    Methacholine Challenge....yes, that's the one.

    This was the test I asked for but the pulmonology specialist was not at all a fan of the test. He said there were too many unknowns that could give it a false positive. As an example he said that having chocolate prior to the test could give it a false positive. In the end he refused to apply the test. He wanted to start with the spirometry and if they wanted more then he would apply the methacholine challenge.

    skier, This is all good feedback!! With that said only you and your peeps will know the route you need to take. Keep watching for more feedback from others on this and do not take my sons story as a path that works; it is only one story.

    Remember the Honor Code!
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2014
  10. ca2midwestmom

    ca2midwestmom Member

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    Again, it may be on a case-by-case basis. DS's remedial specifically stated Methacholine Challenge, while others on this forum were told to get the spirometry test. We didn't ask for either, and frankly I was surprised that DS wasn't DQ'd outright, then put through the waiver process. It's a complicated process and no one answer will fit everyone's question. So again, the best thing candidates can do is be prepared by knowing their medical history and go through the DoDMERB process.
     
  11. ca2midwestmom

    ca2midwestmom Member

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    I'm not a doctor, but based on what we were told about this test it is complicated and has to be administered just so. DS went to an allergy/asthma specialist in a large practice that only sees allergy/asthma patients. The person who administered the test is the only one in the practice trained/qualified to do it, and she's been doing it for many years. She explained the process (it has multiple steps) and the reasons behind each part, but it's been several months since DS took the test so I don't remember them. Just saying your average doctor's office probably doesn't have the equipment or knowledge to administer the test, and the test isn't your typical "blow in a mouthpiece as hard as you can" type of test. It involves inhaling various dosages of a medicine that can/will induce asthma in a patient that has asthma. The test takes an hour or so to administer, including wait time in between doses. My guess is it's also much more expensive to administer, but we didn't pay anything since it was requested by DoDMERB. {Heads up to anyone thinking of having it done on their own.}

    I hope this helps!
     

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