Asthma

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by DCHillin, Nov 16, 2013.

  1. DCHillin

    DCHillin Member

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    I had asthma during my childhood, but the effects of it subsided before I even got to high school, but i was always required to have an inhaler during sports even though i never used it.... would this be a basis of disqualification or would there be more questions asked?
     
  2. ca2midwestmom

    ca2midwestmom Member

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    If you were prescribed an inhaler past the age of 13, it will either show up as a DQ or remedial. If it's a remedial, DoDMERB may request that you have the methacholine challenge test done. Where are you in the process? Did you list everything on your medical history to DoDMERB?
     
  3. DCHillin

    DCHillin Member

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    I am taking my medical exam next saturday, and everything has been listed on dodmets!
     
  4. ca2midwestmom

    ca2midwestmom Member

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    Then you just need to go through the process and wait to see what DoDMERB decides and go from there. My DS had asthma before age 13, with one inhaler prescribed last Fall after club swimming in an overchlorinated/unventilated pool. Everything was listed on his medical history. I thought he would get a DQ, then a waiver, but instead he was given a remedial. He was sent to an asthma specialist for the methacholine challenge test and passed, then his status was changed to Qualified. Good luck!
     
  5. Ex.BT.USN

    Ex.BT.USN Member

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    Ditto

    DCHillin,

    My DS had the same issue. The asthma was questionable at age 8, he never used his medication, this was also documented in his records. It was also in his records as very mild and as time went by it went to intermittent to no signs (age 12.) I can tell you that our mistake as parents (well not a mistake, it was being loving parents) was making sure our DS had his meds (it was a one time issue at 13).

    Knowing in advance that this was going to be a flag for DoDMERB I took the advise from a very wise poster and we took our DS to a Pulmonology Dr. Money well spent, our DS is qualified!!

    I'm not going to get into details but the Pulmonology Dr. would not give our DS the methacholine challenge, he felt that the test was not 100% for accuracy. Instead he gave him the Spirometry test. Based off his prior medical history and the results he was given a clean bill and green light. In fact he excelled in the Spirometry test. All medical records differ in many ways I can't say which test DoDMERB will request but be ready. Read up on what could have an effect on the test so your ready.

    In the end as ca2midwestmom indicated you can get either a DQ or remedial depending on the specifics you indicated on your medical form. If you get a DQ the Academy will then ask for the waiver if they think your a good candidate. (Check the replies on this, someone may have a correction.)

    If you get a reremedial check the code on the DoDMERB site and get what ever it is they need. Back to sound critical advise from a wise poster. Be ready with your medical records. Have a detailed copy of "ALL" your records. Leave nothing out!!!

    Good luck and best wishes...
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2013
  6. goldtrim3

    goldtrim3 Member

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    There is hope

    My son had a similar situation. He he was able to get a waiver. Do as the previous posters said and get all your medical records. It may take some time but hang in there and be persistent
     
  7. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    What it comes down to is whether you currently have asthma or you don't. If you do, your chances of a waiver are almost non-existent. If you are medically shown not to have it, your chances of a waiver improve exponentially.

    As people have described above, there are various tests that can be used to make the determination. Some do it in advance of DODMERB and some after. The advantage of the latter is you know exactly what DODMERB wants before you spend time and money doing something that won't be satisfactory; then again, many have been proactive and it's worked out well.
     
  8. DCHillin

    DCHillin Member

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    no i haven't had any asthma related medical issues since elementary school, i went to an asthma specialist last year, I brought my concern up to him about possibly being disqualified. I was given the spirometry test and passed, i run track, and box and have never needed or used my inhaler after the age of 13.
     
  9. Ex.BT.USN

    Ex.BT.USN Member

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    Very Important

    DCHillin,

    Your last post is very important in regard to passing the spirometry test with the asthma specialist. Because the Dr. is an asthma specialist it will help. Having a specialist is important to DoDMERB. Again, I very wise poster gave me the same guidance.

    You just got a lot of sound advise from a few posters, get "ALL" of your medical records in order.

    +1 usna1985:
    Looks like your peeps have already spent the money. Excellent!!

    The one last piece to obtaining the records is a note from the Dr. saying something to the point that all the records given are the only records. Watch for any follow up post on this someone may recall the exact wording that DoDMERB will look for.

    To that end nobody can promise you if you will get a DQ or remedial, just be ready.

    Cheers!!
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2013
  10. MabryPsyD

    MabryPsyD Dr. G.

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    This may or may not help, but when I've provided memos and other documentation for my patients for commissioning physicals; they usually wanted to see the phrase "in remission." If you have input on what is written in the documentation, ask for that phrase.

    Good luck!
     
  11. DCHillin

    DCHillin Member

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    Ok! so my checklist for my medical should include everything DODMERB/DODMETS has told me to bring as well as my personal medical records?
     
  12. Petry7

    Petry7 Member

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    I'm a high school senior up for the first AROTC board. Last year (16 years old) I was prescribed an inhaler for "asthmatic symptoms" by my doctor. Granted it was during wrestling season, I was sick, and overall susceptible do to cutting weight. I've never had an asthma attack, just some symptoms such as chest tightness during wrestling season. I ran a 5:52 mile, 61 push-ups, 60 sit-ups with no problem. We brought up the diagnosis with my doctor and he says that in no way should it affect anything regarding participating in Rotc and is willing to fight on my behalf. What steps should I take before my Dodmerb exam, and does it sound like my situation will DQ me/ do I have a shot at a waiver. Sorry for semi-hijacking this post. Thanks! -Harris
     
  13. NavyNurseApplicant

    NavyNurseApplicant Member

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    This is just coming from my experience- I was diagnosed with possible asthma as a child and, concerned it would be an issue with DoDMERB, I went ahead and went to a specialist for testing. The specialist cleared me and said he saw no reason that I would not be able to serve. I explained all of this during my DoD physical. I recently received remedial paperwork for other childhood info- but asthma was not among them!
     
  14. MabryPsyD

    MabryPsyD Dr. G.

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    Childhood asthma isn't the issue. the frequency and timeline of treatment is...
     
  15. usna1985

    usna1985 USNA Alumnus

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    Exactly. Having asthma before age 13 isn't an issue. The issue arises when folks have been diagnosed with asthma after age 13 -- i.e.., "adult" asthma (a colloquial, not a medical term).

    No one here can tell anyone their chances for a waiver -- because no two people's medical situations are identical. The fact one person did or didn't get a waiver has no bearing on whether you will.

    As noted above, the key to getting a waiver (if one is needed) is to demonstrate to DODMERB and the SAs that you do not have adult asthma. How you personally do that depends on the specific facts of your situation (your symptoms, your diagnosis, your medications, your age at diagnosis, etc.).
     
  16. MosMom

    MosMom Member

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    Something similar happened to my daughter. She had an inhaler prescribed to her when she was 15 - after practicing volleyball in a gym where the floors were just sanded. Doc prescribe the inhaler as a "precaution" - to carry just in case. Well, knowing what I know now, I'd never have agreed to the prescription as she never used the inhaler.

    She answered all questions on the DODMERB paperwork honestly and we just heard back that she got a remedial - and has to go for a spirometry breathing test done by a DODMERB doctor...at no cost to us. Her appointment was pretty much instantaneous - and is for next Tuesday.

    She and I both feel good about this as we feel she should pass without issue.
     

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