Astronaut

Discussion in 'Life After the Academy' started by alexsisco714, Apr 1, 2012.

  1. alexsisco714

    alexsisco714 New Member

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    I dream big and constantly follow my dreams. If you would have told me 2 years ago that I had even the slightest chance of getting into a service academy I would have laughed in your face. But for me it was the other way around. When I told my high school physics teacher that I had been appointed to the USAFA he was in complete disbelief. Keep in mind he was one of my teacher recommendations directly to the application. So I do not let status quo keep me from pursing my dreams. And that is why I want to be an astronaut. People say in 10 years there will be no need for astronauts or there wont be enough money in the nasa budget for space exploration. Do you know what I say? "we'll see:wink:" Is anyone else seeking a career in space exploration?
     
  2. USCGA13STN

    USCGA13STN Member

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    There are quite a few people here at USCGA who are thinking about space as a viable option. Its especially heartening knowing that CAPT Dan Burbank, who just got back from being the CO of the ISS, was an Academy Grad who went into space while still on Active Duty (though this last mission he was indeed out of the service) he's one of two Coast Guard Astronauts who we as a service are very proud of!
     
  3. SeaMars

    SeaMars Member

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    Great to dream big, and I believe that when the current economic climate improves, we'll go back -- but be careful what you say in the process. Dream quietly. "Mars Boy" was one of several young cadets who talked a big game, had a very bad first day at USAFA and did not last.

    http://www.brownsvilleherald.com/news/academy-98120-air-riojas.html

    and

    http://news.cnet.com/8301-13772_3-10273555-52.html [That's him in the first picture].
    Another basic cadet also had attracted a huge amount of attention from the group. At one point, I counted at least seven cadets circled around him, screaming at him and yelling and belittling him. I asked someone why he'd been singled out, and was told that this particular basic cadet had somehow let it be known that he planned on being the first man on Mars, and that his time at the Academy was little more than a brief stepping stone on his way to glory as an astronaut.
    He may be right. But on this day, he was just fresh meat, and a prime target for ridicule.
     
  4. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Geez, I hope not SERIOUSLY thinking about it.... not only were there only two but now you also don't have shuttles.

    Keep it sea level! :wink: :biggrin:
     
  5. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

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    There is a saying that "Luck" is when preparation meets opportunity.

    With the manned space program being in the situation it is, and your timeline probably being 15+ years out, nobody can really tell you your odds. So, do your best, and line yourself up for any opportunities that pop up.
     
  6. SamAca10

    SamAca10 Ensign - DWO

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    Or better yet, in the air :wink:
     
  7. USAFA_2012

    USAFA_2012 Member

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    that's a good goal to have, but you should probably be focused on getting through basic training right now, not on getting into space.

    don't forget that at the Academy, you are surrounded by people who "do not let the status quo" keep them from "pursuing their dreams". and yet cadets/officers frequently fall short of the standard for whatever they initially wanted to do. whether that be fighter pilot, test pilot, astronaut, Lt Col, etc, stuff happens and it's not always up t you.

    the competition will always be rough because the caliber of people you are competing against all have that "do or die" mentality -- not just you. and sorry, but not everyone can be an astronaut :eek:
     
  8. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

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    Excellent advice USAFA 2012. 2 things that have been common for just about every class; every year.

    1. The vast majority of brand new cadets/mids use to be BIG FISH in a LITTLE POND. Once they get to the academy, they realize that they are a LITTLE FISH in a BIG POND. That's hard for some to accept. It's no longer "All about them"; or them being in the "Lime Light".

    2. Chances are that 98+% of all cadets in your class are going to be "Type-A Personalities". They are use to doing things their way. They are use to achieving high goals and standards. They are use to being in complete control of their lives. At the academy, some will get their first "B" EVER in their life. They will be shocked. Instead of them being the natural leader, as they were in their high school class, they are going to have to learn to be a "FOLLOWER".

    It's definitely great to have goals and dreams. And there's nothing wrong with aiming high. Just realize that the pride you had in high school for being ranked in the Top-10%; having a 3.90-4.0gpa; being captain/leader of whatever sport/club; National Honor Society; etc... is something that EVERY OTHER STUDENT at the academy shares too. It was great in High School. Part of the pride was knowing that you achieved MORE than the majority of your classmates. Well; you haven't achieved more that your fellow cadets. So definitely have those dreams. Just realize that you aren't the only one with such dreams, and the others with similar dreams are just as accomplished as you are. Best of luck to you. Mike....
     
  9. mmb5

    mmb5 Member

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    Just back from a visit to the National Air and Space Museum - Space Day- with Col. Patrick Forrester USMA 1979, a spacewalking specialist who has logged 16 million flight miles. He spoke at length about the Orion program and what's next. So yes, it's a long shot - in more ways than one - but somebody is going to do it! Good luck.
     

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