Aviation

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by JamesVanKirk09, Mar 22, 2009.

  1. JamesVanKirk09

    JamesVanKirk09 Member

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    I was just wondering if anyone knows how difficult it is to get into an aviation career from the Naval Academy, specifically becoming a pilot. What kind of class rank is necessary etc. etc.
     
  2. oldgrad

    oldgrad Banned

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    I think pretty much everyone who wants it right now is getting it, aviator if you are physically qualified, NFO if not. Elective eye surgery for most has made NPQ for pilot almost a thing of the past.

    With that said, try not to be the anchor man.
     
  3. Eagle

    Eagle Member

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    Pilot need decreasing?

    Testing a thought. Do you think the need for NAVY pilots is decreasing (relatively) becuase on the increased use of unmanned DRONE aircraft?
     
  4. oldgrad

    oldgrad Banned

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  5. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    JVK09, we always advise our sponsor mids to shoot for at least the top third of the class for best leverage on service selection. We had a mid who was comfortably in the top third, was physically q'ed for aviation, "sat" in all respects, but did a bonehead thing his 2/c year. The resulting demerits tanked him downward and he did not make the cut for Navy pilot. To be accurate, it wasn't just the demerits but the nature of his bonehead thing that stained his record. All of our mids who wanted aviation and did the work to maintain a solid class standing got what they wanted, in terms of community.

    This past year, all 7 of our sponsor mids got what they wanted, whether it was the one who has a single-digit standing in the class or the ones hanging out in the middle and lower third.

    As with anything else, working hard to be more than sat in academics, physical and military performance will pay off in the end. If you keep your internal focus on aviation, and that remains constant for you as you sample other communities during USNA years, that will help you put your nose to the grindstone and avoid conduct/performance/honor derailments.

    And don't ever forget the folks in the bottom parts of the class are just as likely to be extremely successful and advance to the top of the Navy and Marine Corps.
     
  6. kaullman

    kaullman Member

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    Recent Aviation Service Selection Stats

    Class of 2008
    319 pilots of 1047 grads - 30%

    Class of 2009
    307 pilots of 1058 grads - 29%

    Those numbers include USMC pilots. Capt MJs advice is spot on. For best service selection you wish to be in the top one-third of your class. Two of the most selective career options are usually Special Warfare (SEAL) and USMC ground.
     
  7. oldgrad

    oldgrad Banned

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    Your advice would be correct only if the entire classes first choice were aviation. Historically for the past several years, 90% +/- of each class has been given either their first or second choice for career selection. Therefore, if one chose pilot first choice and NFO second choice, they have a relatively certain chance of success. Not to say they shouldn't do the best they can though.
     
  8. JamesVanKirk09

    JamesVanKirk09 Member

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    Thanks for the info. Now I've got a new question, for aviation what does physically qualified entail?
     
  9. jbrown

    jbrown Member

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    It means you didn't get in with a waiver that limits you to restricted line, vs unrestricted line.

    It also means you aren't too tall to fit into the cockpit, or two muscular, etc.

    You must also make it through a series of schools, which if you wash out from either of them, you could find yourself doing something totally different than you had planned for.

    JB
     
  10. Riv-Rod

    Riv-Rod Member

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    That wouldnt include a waiver for eyesight correct? Restricted line just means you have a certain condition with a waiver tight?
     
  11. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    It depends on whether you are talking about physically qualified (PQ) for aviation or the Academy. For aviation PQ is even a step beyond being PQ'd for the Academy. If you have poor eyesight you would likely be found not physically qualified (NPQ) for aviation; however, USNA offers its midshipmen laser eye surgery which is waiverable for aviation.
     
  12. USNA '16

    USNA '16 Member

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    I am in high school now, but was interested in becoming a Marine pilot after graduating from the NA. How difficult do you think that would be considering that I am a woman?
     
  13. gdesena

    gdesena USNA Midshipman

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    Just taking a stab at this one. I don't see why the pilot part of it would be any harder that being a guy going for it. The challenges you'll face for being a woman (discrimination, sexism, etc.) I'm pretty sure you'll see pretty much wherever you are in the military just by the demographics of it being so dominantly male.

    I don't mean to override your question, but since it was brought up, if we have a medical waiver that says PQ'd, that means qualified for pilot too, right? My waiver says nothing about restrictions so I assume this applies to PQ for pilot.
     
  14. texan101

    texan101 Member

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    Sorry to bring up another old post but I was looking around and if you read through this thread its talking about pilots and restricted/unrestricted line. What does that mean in reference to being accepted to the Naval Academy with a waiver for flat feet. Would having flat feet (but no negative effects) and a waiver have anything to do with being pilot qualified?
     

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