B splits in the Atlantic

Discussion in 'Merchant Marine Academy - USMMA' started by jessibee2013, Aug 31, 2010.

  1. jessibee2013

    jessibee2013 Member

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    Another stupid sea year question:

    All you old salts out there, Earl is headed toward the southeastern coast at the same time as DS's ship (SC/Ga). Should a mother be worried? How bad could it get out there for the ship?
    Thanks for any insights and information. I get "no news is good news" but until he calls us from Charleston on Thursday, I'm going to worry. .. really worry the more I hear about Earl strengthening!!:frown:
     
  2. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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  3. deepdraft1

    deepdraft1 Master, Ocean Steam or Motor Vessels, unlimited

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    It can get pretty bad for even big ships. I was working at APL in 1986 when the SS PRESIDENT TAFT had close encounters with 2 typhoons (Western Pacific version of a hurricane) within the span of 6 days. The ship suffered the loss of containers and structural damage in excess of 1.2 million dollars. Fortunately no one was seriously hurt. Anyway, the master of your son’s ship will need to exercise prudent seamanship and caution before making any decision committing to an evasive route. Hopefully he will be able to head southwest well behind and out of Earl’s forecast path to the northeast. Any attempt to cross ahead of or to navigate in the near vicinity of these beasts can, as in the case of the TAFT, lead to catastrophic results. I’m sure they’re watching the weather VERY closely.
     
  4. jessibee2013

    jessibee2013 Member

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    Thanks for sharing your wisdom.
    A quick update- we've heard nothing but didn't expect to until they are in port in the US but according to shipwx.info, their arrival in Charleston has been delayed from Thursday to Saturday and their position in the Atlantic has been stationary for the past 18 hours. Waiting Earl out, I assume.
     

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