Backup schools

Discussion in 'Publicly and Privately Funded Military Colleges' started by Art.Perea, Jun 17, 2012.

  1. Art.Perea

    Art.Perea Member

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    So I am applying to West Point as my first choice and I want to be an army officer. So my question is how do the other military colleges compare to West Point in terms of military training and leadership development? Also, I understand it is a giant ROTC school, so do I need to get an ROTC scholarship as well, or is admission to one of the colleges automatically get me the ROTC scholarship and commission?
     
  2. Frankie

    Frankie Member

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    What schools do you have in mind?

    What environment would you be comfortable in?
     
  3. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    In terms of purely Army training while in college- nobody is going to match USMA. The Senior Military Colleges basically have the same Army training opportunities that every other ROTC program offers- chances to attend Airborne, Air Assault, Cold Weather, CTLT etc... But from the commissioning standpoint what the SMCs offer over other AROTC programs is a guarantee that if the PMS recommends it, they will be given Active Duty. That's a valuable guarantee in an Army that is drawing down in size. and of course- because their ROTC programs dwarf those of the normal ROTC programs, they get numerically more slots to everything though statistically they may not be that much higher a chance. like any other ROTC program - you do not have to have an ROTC scholarship to gain a commission- all you have to do is successfully complete the ROTC program.
    There are however a lot of reasons to consider going to an SMC beyond the relationship with the Army. What I tell kids when doing my recruiting visits for VMI- you go to one of these schools because you really want to challenge yourself in all aspects of your life. The military framework at a Senior Military college exists as a way to teach discipline, honor & integrity, perseverance, teamwork and a sense of duty and responsibility to others while pursuing a degree in a small rigorous academic environment (The student/faculty ratio at VMI for example is 11-1/2 to 1 and you will be in virtually no classes with more than 20 other Cadets in them. You are under a lot of Academic pressure with no chance to hide in a lecture hall- at the same time that you have to perform all of those military duties. Those are traits that stand you in excellent stead regardless of whether you become a career military officer, a reserve officer, or never commission and spend a lifetime in Civilian pursuits.

    So what is different between the various Senior Military Colleges? As I said in my post on the other thread:
    These schools have some very informative web sites: The link to the VMI site is below- take a look, then do the same at the other SMCs.
    http://www.vmi.edu/
    also- here is a the profile of the VMI class of 2015 to give you some idea of where you stand for admission there:
    http://www.vmi.edu/uploadedFiles/Admissions/Class_of_2015 Sheet1.pdf


    These colleges are not for everybody for certain, but for the Cadet who does attend and stick with it, they become one of the greatest experiences of your life and one that you wouldn't trade for all the Frat parties in the world. (BTW if you really are into partying- these are NOTthe school for you. VMI managed last year to be deadlast on Playboy's ranking of Party colleges. The University of Alaska at Kotzebue- a college in a Dry (no Alcohol) Eskimo town north of the Arctic Circle scored higher:rolleyes: )
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2012
  4. Art.Perea

    Art.Perea Member

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    I only looked at The Citadel and VMI so far. I want a highly regimented and highly stressful environment. I want a challenge and I want to be reminded everyday that I will be an army officer in the future. I want to attend the one with the most rigorous military and physical training.


    And Bruno, thank you for all the information, it is very helpful.
     
  5. bruno

    bruno Retired Staff Member

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    Well- then you are looking at the right two schools.
     
  6. AF6872

    AF6872 Member

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    Look at the Maritimes also. You can get a commission from them after four and wear a uniform for four years. Brother in law did VMI but worked as a Nuclear Engineer for thirty without a commission but still has that plumed cover in the center of the mantlepiece. They do get a choice. They are all a great experience. They all have great parties!
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2012
  7. Lawman32RPD

    Lawman32RPD Member

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    Bruno and others know a lot more about these schools than I do and I'd urge you to pay particular attention to his advice and counsel. That said, as Bruno said, the various SMC's have simularities and differences. As I understand it, North Georgia is an Army only SMC. The other SMC's have all branches of ROTC. At Texas A&M University (TAMU) the Corps of Cadets is about 2,100 students in an student body of roughly 50,000 between undergraduates and graduates. The TAMU Cadets life in separate dorms and while they take the same classes that the other students do the cadets have a lot of Corps responsibilities. As a freshman at TAMU you won't get the one on one attention you would at VMI, the Citadel, or Norwich. There are, however, advantages of scale that come with a large university in terms of resources and opportunities. You'll have to decide what the best fit for you is. If you can, try to visit the ones that seem the most appealing to you. All of the schools have informative websites. As I understand it, both North Georgia and TAMU offer in-state tuition to out of state students who are members of the respective Corps of Cadets. At TAMU the cadets join various units which can be based on ROTC affiliation and major. Some of the units focus on commissioning, some on academic success, some on physical training. You can learn more about the TAMU Corps by going to http://corps.tamu.edu . You'll also find a link to ask questions of Corps members. There are also various "backdoor" ways to get into TAMU, including spending a year at Texas A&M Galveston or the Blinn Team. You can learn more about those programs by talking the TAMU Corps. Best of luck wherever you go.
     

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