bad eyesight...

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by baseball17, May 16, 2016.

  1. baseball17

    baseball17 Member

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    I know that the topic of bad eyesight and having corrective eye surgery has been posted before, but I have a few questions that have not been answered on the previous posts. I have nearsighted vision and I want to be either a Navy Seal or a pilot. I know you cannot have corrective eye surgery before you enter into the Academy. I also know you may be able to get corrective eye surgery at the Naval Academy. For people that want to do jobs that have strict vision requirements I was wondering if only a select few get the surgery or if you are medically able to get the corrective eye surgery will you be able to get it for sure at the Academy? I was also wondering if the same goes for the Air Force Academy for pilot training selection?

    Thank you for your help!
     
  2. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

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    Eye surgery is not hard to get if you are physically qualified for it at USNA. If you want it and are cleared for it, shouldn't be an issue.
     
  3. Blessedmom

    Blessedmom Member

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    I had lasik/corrective surgery 10 yrs ago, it was great in the beginning but now after 10 yrs my eyes are extremely dry, straining/tried eyes, I live on eye drops, use restatis, and also have night vision issues. My DS will be class of 2020 and I am against him getting corrective eye surgery. Everyone is different...I feel unless it's mandatory for job assignment better not to have surgery:)
     
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  4. nuensis

    nuensis USNA 2016

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    It will definitely be offered to you if you want it. However, you will undergo a medical evaluation before the operation. There are certain parameters you must meet in order to get PRK/LASIK (both will qualify you for aviation) that will be out of your control (e.g. the thickness of your cornea, level of astigmatism, etc.). The surgery will correct myopia, but may not correct astigmatism or any other issues your eyes may have that are disqualifying (strabismus, for example).

    If you experience complications and those complications do not resolve (I had dry eyes for almost a year after my PRK operation), you may be looking at NPQ/restricted line. You'll get detailed briefs on the process and the risks when the time comes.
     
  5. Joedoe

    Joedoe Member

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    You would have to wait until after you sign your 2 for 7, or not before your 2nd class year before you are eligible for it.
     
  6. socalfan

    socalfan Member

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    I had Lasik over 15 years ago and have had no complications, I've always said it was some of the best money I ever spent.
     
  7. baseball17

    baseball17 Member

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    Thank you guys for all the help!
     
  8. Hockeydad

    Hockeydad Member

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    I'm an eye surgeon who has specialized in LASIK and PRK for over 20 years. Blessedmom, your were going to get "extremely dry, straining/tried eyes" whether or not you had LASIK. LASIK does not cause chr0nic dry eye. It causes an increase in symptoms and signs of dry eye for six to eight months until the corneal nerves grow back into the flap. However, many patients seek LASIK/PRK because they have underlying dry eye and had resultant contact lens intolerance. For most people, it is "some of the best money they ever spent." I do surgery on people either in the military or aiming for the military, all the time, and all of them are very happy they had the surgery. The Navy did extensive studies on LASIK and PRK and now allow these procedures for pilots because they are safe (much safer than contact lenses in the long run due to the ongoing risk of microbial keratitis and other complications with contact lenses) and highly effective.
     
  9. baseball17

    baseball17 Member

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    Thank you for your help!
     
  10. Hockeydad

    Hockeydad Member

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    Whether the Navy will allow you to have laser vision correction depends on the level of myopia/hyperopia/astigmatism and what you will be doing. Thus, they are more stringent for would-be pilots than others about the maximum level of correction allowed. I suggest that you ask for the guidelines at each of the institutions you are interested in attending and see how your glasses prescription stacks up with the guidelines. I'm not sure if they provide it while actually at the academies or not. I do know that a lot of pilots had the surgery at the Navy's expense in San Diego and other facilities. I've had two patients this year who were already in the Air Force. I'm not sure if they were reimbursed for the expense by the Air Force or not.
     
  11. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    Hockeydad-Doc - yes, mids get screened and can have the surgery 2/C (junior year), if approved, after they have signed their commitment papers. Plenty of mids walking around with the plastic shades and hitting the eye drops. Surgery is performed at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Bethesda. I think it's PRK that is authorized for aviators.

    http://www.wrnmmc.capmed.mil/Health...er Refractive Eye Surgery/SitePages/Home.aspx
     
  12. 2017 DS 2019 DD

    2017 DS 2019 DD Member

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    They actually have PRK surgery some time after they sign the 2 for 7. It is more permanent than LASIK and more painful but the reward of great eyesight makes it worth it for most.
     
  13. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    Just to clarify a few points here:

    -For Naval Aviation PRK or LASIK is approved and the choice is up to the patient with surgeon guidance (and limited by other factors such as corneal scarring etc)

    -PRK and LASIK are equivalent in permanence.
     
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  14. socalfan

    socalfan Member

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    I was going to say...I had LASIK at least 15 years ago and as far as I can tell it's permanent! I was also told I would possibly need reading glasses earlier because of it and so far that has not been the case.
     
  15. tchr1stgrd

    tchr1stgrd New Member

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    I had LASIK in 1998. I'm now in my mid 40s (how did that happen?) and I use reading glasses. Otherwise, my vision has been wonderful and I have no regrets having LASIK. It was painless and quick. Ten minutes per eye and I could see. Truly a miracle.
     

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