BCT activities

Discussion in 'Air Force Academy - USAFA' started by 15USAFAap, Dec 20, 2010.

  1. 15USAFAap

    15USAFAap Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2010
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi,

    I was wondering what kind of activities I can expect to face at BCT. I would like to start training for them. Also, may I ask why some people do not make it, other than injuries?

    Thank you :)
     
  2. Christcorp

    Christcorp Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    Messages:
    4,963
    Likes Received:
    872
    The biggest thing you can do to prepare for BCT, especially if you're not accustomed to high altitude, is running. Lots of running. Also, anything cardio. Swimming, hiking, etc... If you can throw in any upper body strength exercises, that would be good to. Also, practice trying to stand at attention for 5 minutes without moving a muscle. "Hint: Slightly bend your knees ever so slightly. If you don't, and you lock your knees, you will pass out".

    As to why people drop out of BCT other than for physical injuries.... That's simple. It isn't what they thought it would be, and mentally, they give up. They don't want it. They realize it isn't for them. There is no amount of knowledge that anyone can give you here that can tell you what it's "Really Like". Reason being: One person's hell is another person's heaven. For some people, it's great. For others, they don't want to have anything more to do with it. Those who believe that because they were in JrROTC, Civil Air Patrol, or Scout, they have an understanding of BCT and the academy, and therefor will do better at it..... Those usually have an even more difficult time adjusting. The closest I've seen anyone deal immediately with BCT and the academy, are Brats. (Children of military families). Not because of any particular training, but usually because of a level of discipline and being accustomed for 17 years of a certain mannerism. But even that isn't a guarantee. We've seen Brats, JrROTC, CAP, Jocks, etc... all fail. And, we've seen them all make it.

    It's all mental and all a matter of perspective. If you have a firm grip on reality and your goals, then you can understand WHY things are the way they are. If you can associate the lifestyle with reaching your goals, then you will make it. If you can't, you might quit. It's all about perspective. If the air force academy is your "Goal", then you'll have a very difficult time. If you realize that the air force academy is simply one means of reaching your goal(s), then you'll be able to handle it. Just like all the hard work you did academically in high school. Did you do it all because that was your goal, or did you do it because it would lead to reaching further goals like a good college, excellent career, financial, etc... Does a football player go through 2-a-day practices because they love practicing, or because the hard work might help him to possibly be a starter on the team some day; become a better athlete; and win games??? Keep in perspective WHY you do things, and everything will work out just right. "Assuming what you're doing during BCT and the academy in fact does lead to your goals.

    If your goal was a free college education, whereby you figure you'll give the air force 5 years of your life for that education, you may find that it isn't worth it for you. If you really want to be part of something that is BIGGER than you; bigger than the individual; requires teamwork; and you are part of such a team... Then you'll be able to understand WHY you do certain things in BCT and at the academy. It's not to teach you HOW to do something. You can teach a monkey how to do half the stuff you're taught. It's to teach you how to do it as a team. Even if you don't think you need anyone else's help, eventually you will. You'll need to know how to be part of a team. If you remember that, then everything else can make sense. But that's why people drop out. Their goals had nothing to do with teamwork. It had nothing to do with being part of something bigger than themselves. It had nothing to do with service before self. Therefor, nothing during BCT or at the academy, made any real sense. It didn't seem worth it. So, they quit. Keep things in perspective and you'll do fine. Best of luck... Mike.....
     
  3. Roman

    Roman Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2008
    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    0
    Push ups!! We did hundreds of push ups a day.
     
  4. luckymacy

    luckymacy Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2010
    Messages:
    291
    Likes Received:
    0
    what happens if you can't pass the PFT and or AFT

    For example, 84 inche is a LONG jump, so is 11 pullups for some kids no matter how hard they try. So if you are close but not quite to 250 points, what do they do with you?
     
  5. 15USAFAap

    15USAFAap Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2010
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you all

    Thank you Christcorp and everybody else that replied. The answers were very helpful :thumb:
     
  6. raimius

    raimius USAFA Alumnus

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    2,236
    Likes Received:
    272
    If your PEA (Physical Education Average) drops below a 2.0, you go on Athletic Probation. On part of that is Reconditioning (Recondo). Recondo is a set of 3 mandatory workouts per week. Usually they are from about 1640 to 1820. They are good workouts, and focus on PFT events (where most people on Recondo failed). Also, as part of Athletic Probation, you will be restricted to base except for leave. It sucks. Don't place yourself in that position (voice of experience).
     
  7. OBXmom

    OBXmom Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2010
    Messages:
    157
    Likes Received:
    0
    From speaking with my son during and after BCT this year, I think the greatest key to surviving BCT is your attitude.
    Realize, that you (and every other candidate) are used to excelling at almost everything. You are used to finishing in the top percentage, and mastering everything you've put your mind to. BCT will be different.
    I recommend doing some research to mentally prepare yourself. Use the search function on these pages, and read about the Air Force's goals they are trying to achieve during BCT. Read posts written by people that have been through it, read posts by cadre (those are the folks that will be yelling at you) and read posts from the parents of both.
    It is a shock for many to be yelled at and criticized and physically punished (push ups, sit ups, and various other "torturous" excercises). Many if not most times it will feel "unfair." For many its the first times in their lives they've experienced it. The great advantage you have is that you are smart. If you research the process, then you will be aware of its ultimate goals. You will realize its not personal...its a system. It is a proven system, and it does work. Your job is to survive.
    My son shared with me that once he and his fellow cadets realized that they would do x amount of up/downs a day no matter what, it made it easier to take the yelling, and not take it too personally. You still need to strive to master each skill and activity, but know that you will screw up, and at times you will fail. How you handle yourself at that time is the task more so than what leads up to it. Sharing your mental and physical strength with your BCT squad is also a huge part of the goal. Don't be the whiner.
    You are the only one who can control your attitude. No one else has that power unless you give it to them! Stay away from the whiners. Guard your attitude and tough it out!
    ...just my two cents.
    Best of luck to you!
     
  8. falcongirl

    falcongirl USAFA grad

    Joined:
    May 23, 2008
    Messages:
    336
    Likes Received:
    22
    Come prepared to physically AND mentally put out. One of the worst parts of the beatings during basic was not knowing how many pushups you'd have to do, how long you'd have to hold front leaning rest (pushup position), or how many miles you were going to cover on a rifle run. My advice is to always mentally prepare yourself to, literally, run the extra mile or do 50 more pushups when your arms are shaking and you think you are done.

    The cadre were basics once too, and understand that there is nothing more demoralizing than thinking you are finished with a beating, course, ect, and then being told you are nowhere near finished. This strategy is used quite a bit in basic as part of the "breaking down" process. For example, in my basic flight someone walked out of the latrine with their pc shirt untucked and the cadre found a unlocked rife. Suddenly, we owed them 1200 exercises to pay for it. We were told to get our rifles and proceeded to "pay" for our neglegence with 500 consecutive rifle curls. While we exercised with a few cadre, the rest inspected our tents and found an unlocked trunk. We were marched over to the (now destroyed) tent and informed that none of the curls had counted; we were back to zero and this time we'd pay in pushups. :yllol: It's funny now, but back then...

    Also, practice holding front leaning rest for excessive lengths of time, at least 15 minutes. Doing the required pushups is difficult enough, but holding front leaning rest with a straight back after 100 pushups and 10 minutes is much harder. Add the weight of a full canteen and camelback (which you are required to wear during Jack's), and working out is suddenly a lot less fun :rolleyes:.
     
  9. marciemi

    marciemi USMA Alumnus

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2009
    Messages:
    1,481
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you haven't checked it out yet, usafawebguy.com is a great resource for you, and soon - for your parents. If you set up a free account, you can access the daily schedules from last summer which may help give you a good feel for the various activities and times. Of course it's a bit vague, since at any given time different squadrons (and even flights) may have been doing different things, but it's a starting point at least!

    I'd also recommend reading the book Skies to Conquer (came out in April) which gives a pretty good look at the whole first year at USAFA.
     

Share This Page