Blue Star/Gold Star families

Discussion in 'Academy/Military News' started by fencersmother, Aug 18, 2015.

  1. fencersmother

    fencersmother Founding Member

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    At the beginning of Gulf War II (especially), there were lots of "blue star" families around my little town, though I don't see the stars anymore (and saw only one gold star).

    Do these still exist?

    What are the requirements, etc. to hang that blue star in your window? Where does one get one?
     
  2. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

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    Yes they are still around. You saw much more of them a few years ago. Gold Star families definitely do still exist. Most states have licenses plates for Gold Star families if they choose to get one. I saw them in my former state and current state. Blue Star families will sometimes put the emblem on their car or hang the flag in the window. You can get Blue Star stuff online pretty easily like Amazon. I think with the slow down of combat deployments less folks are putting them up.
     
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  3. NorwichDad

    NorwichDad Member

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    Spot on above , we have a blue one in our front window(not very large). I bought it at the Wisconsin Veteran's Museum when my son deployed a couple of years ago. Our state has the Gold Star Family license plates also. Very sad, grateful and respectful when you see one on the road.
     
  4. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    I agree with NavyHoops. I have a banner/flag(5x8 inches) for the window that I purchased on line years ago.

    It now hangs in my sunroom/study. I purchased it for when Bullet was sent to the Green Zone back in 04.
    ~ As soon as Bullet came home from the Green Zone it was taken out of the window. When he was deployed for Gulf1, ONW/OSW prior to 9/11 we did the yellow ribbons for everyday they were gone. After 9/11 we were told don't make it noticed to strangers that he is deployed. Mostly for safety reasons...aka robberies. The blue star in the window or hanging on the front door looked more like decoration.

    Although my DS serves, I would not display a blue star flag because I believe it stands for in combat. If he is deployed to a combat zone I will pull it back off my wall and hang it proudly on the door, but I hope never to be faced with that option. I hope it stays on my wall as a reminder of what Bullet did as a military member.

    This is from wiki.
    The flag or banner is defined as a white field with a red border, with a blue star for each family member serving in the Armed Forces of the United States during any period of war or hostilities in which the Armed Forces of the United States are engaged.

    To me, hanging a blue star means more than being in the military while our country is involved in hostilities. It means right now they are involved in the hostilities, their lives are at risk, hence why I removed it from my window/door as soon as Bullet returned home.

    I get your pride, but maybe it just me, I would hope you never have to buy one for your kids. I surely never want to hang it on my front door or window for my DS. I will be happy to watch it fade away. I will never post it on display (door/window) until he is deployed for combat, and will be jumping for joy the minute he returns.
    ~ Did I say I never want to see this on my door/window?

    I know you are not military and this appears to be a great aspect for support for your twins, but if you follow why it was created, you will never want to own one.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2015
  5. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

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    Agree with everything Pima said. My parents did hang a blue star one when I left on my deployments. It was small and she put it in the front window. They took it down when I finally came home on leave after deployments. I don't think my mom believed it until she saw me in person. With the years my service ran, I unfortunately know plenty of Gold Star families. I did 25 funerals before the age 30. Some chose the license plates and some did not. If I see one in a parking lot and the family is there I always take a few moments to say hi, thank them and ask about their family member.
     

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