Blue toes and cold hands

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by lillian, Nov 29, 2013.

  1. lillian

    lillian Candidate

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    At my medical exam the doctor noticed my blue and red, cold toes and cold hands. They've been that way since I was about twelve. I never thought it was a big deal and I'm not sure what it's from...

    They also couldn't read my pulse at my wrist and had to use a machine to take it.

    Could my cold hands and feet be disqualifying?
     
  2. Rocko

    Rocko Member

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    Have you been to the Doctor for this? I cannot fathom my son having those symptoms and not taking him in to get it checked out.

    In my opinion whether it is a DQ or not is insignificant. While those symptoms could be nothing, they also could be a sign of something much more serious. I'm no Doctor but that sure sounds like poor circulation.

    If you get it checked out and they find nothing wrong, then you are ahead of the game should they come back with a remedial. If they find something wrong then perhaps you can get it taken care of and remain healthy.


    Being healthy is MUCH more important than being in the Academy.
     
  3. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    +1 Rocko,

    Go see your family doc, as Rocko stated if it is nothing than you are in front of it in case you get a remedial, if it is something than you are getting medical attention that you need.
     
  4. JMS

    JMS Member

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    Well, the fact they noticed and, I assume, asked you about it, tells me it was not a passing comment to make conversation. On the other hand, they did not send you to the hospital.
    +1 to the advice above. I would expect to have to address questions about it later.
     
  5. meh126

    meh126 Member

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    It sounds like you have Raynaud's . I have no idea if this condition would be cause for concern but can't imagine how/why it would exclude you from duty. To the best of my knowledge there are no tests that definitively diagnose you as having it. I have it and also have a very slow pulse, I'm not sure the two are connected at all. Are you a runner? I have been told that that can make your pulse slower/harder to hear...not sure if that's true?! Good luck!
     
  6. AROTC Parent

    AROTC Parent Member

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    Let the Doc's diagnose and DoDmerb DQ.

    Take a look at this link.... http://www.apd.army.mil/ Army Regulation (AR) 40-501

    Chapter 2 is the general criteria for enlistment, appointment, and induction.

    Raynaud's does not meet enlistment, appointment, and induction standards.

    Good Luck
     
  7. meh126

    meh126 Member

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    Yikes, you mean to tell me my post doesn't meet the necessary qualifications to diagnose or DQ???!!! That's just crazy talk.
     
  8. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    That was my first thought as well. If you haven't already you need to make sure you get an evaluation by your primary care doctor.

    As to the potential DQ of this problem you describe...well it all likely depends on the final diagnosis.
     
  9. Jayceguy

    Jayceguy Jayceguy

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    Unless one of your parents is either a snuff, or a member of blue man group, that sounds like a potentially dangerous condition! (Not that I have any knowledge on the subject)

    Sent using the Service Academy Forums® mobile app
     
  10. Jayceguy

    Jayceguy Jayceguy

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    *smurf

    Sent using the Service Academy Forums® mobile app
     
  11. lillian

    lillian Candidate

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    It really sounds a lot worse than it looks.

    I have brought it up casually to my primary care physician a few times, but he pretty much just said he didn't think it was a big deal and he didn't know what it was..

    Should I make an appointment about it anyway?
     
  12. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Yes!

    However, I would find another doc. If people here have diagnosed you (not saying they are correct) within one post, and your primary doc hasn't, and nor does he know what it may be, I would find a new doc. Caveat we are going off what you tell us.

    It is better to err on the safe side than ignore it.

    OBTW, no offense to your primary, but I am sure you know by now that the military demands a higher level than your primary. IOWs it may be no biggie for the primary doc and yourself, but for the military it may become a remedial issue.

    I am not trying to be Janie Raincloud. I am not a doc. I am just saying that what you have stated here may trigger a remedial or DQ. The DoDMERB doc made a note of this issue in front of you. You have acknowledged taking a pulse was an issue.

    Candidates confuse the fact/reason why DQs are not waived. It is truly not about you alone, it is about how your medical condition will impact those you serve with from an AD perspective.
    ~~~ Sorry either your fingers/toes are blue tint or they aren't. I don't think anyone here believes that they look like blueberries (color), for me, I assume that they are light powder blue. What is worrisome is the fact that you yourself acknowledge you know they have a blue tint.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2013
  13. MedB

    MedB Parent

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    We've had quite enough of this kind of personal attack and bigotry here. Some of my best friends just happen to be smurfs and I know they would resent being referenced in such a stereotypical way.
     
  14. Jayceguy

    Jayceguy Jayceguy

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    I am extremely sorry. My elf friends are often the subject of similar attacks regarding ear shape.

    Sent from my Desire HD using Service Academy Forums® mobile app
     
  15. lillian

    lillian Candidate

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    Okay. So this problem required a remedial. I was going to take the option of using a medical provider provided by Concorde, but they said they can't find an internal medicine specialist in my area and that they have 30 days to find one. Wayyyy too long at this point.

    So. I went and saw a doctor covered by my insurance. He diagnosed it as a mild case of primary acrocyanosis. Would this diagnosis be enough?

    The remedial request says "requires a physician's appointment: please obtain a new consultation by an internal medicine specialist regarding 17 year old Academy applicant with purple discoloration of bilateral toes noted during screening exam. Please evaluate the applicant and her medical history to rule out vascular disorder."

    The doctor report states the diagnosis, says there is no need for treatment, and mentioned that I have no medical history of any vascular disorders and have no family history of vascular disorders. He told me if they don't think it's enough, then I could go to a cardiologist, but he said that most internal medicine specialists won't see patients under 18...
     
  16. lillian

    lillian Candidate

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    Btw. Don't look up acrocyanosis on Google images. Those pictures are pretty much all mislabeled.
     
  17. Aveon

    Aveon Member

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    Well I am not a doctor or giving medical advice, but I will say two things:

    First, internal medicine doctors WILL see patients under 18, I know that for a fact. And, coming from a mother, Acrocyanosis can be a symptom of more severe underlying issues, so you really should go one step further and see a cardiologist or internal medicine doctor.

    Second, just fyi...when reviewing the military regulations of standards of medical fitness in the past, I recall a section at the end called, I believe, "general and misc conditions and defects". In that section, it listed a subsection called, I believe again, "history or current cold related disorders", in which I saw cyanosis listed. You may want to research and try to find that reg and see if it pertains to your case. Otherwise, all you can do now is sit back and wait for your Dodmerb answer.

    Best of luck, I sincerely hope it all works out for you! Keep us updated :smile:
     
  18. USAFA83GradWife

    USAFA83GradWife Member

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    I will caveat this by saying I'm no doctor.

    I also have slightly blue and cold fingertips. The fact that the doctor diagnosed PRIMARY acrocyanosis means there's no underlying cause. That's good news. Secondary acrocyanosis is a completely different beast.

    This means that your fingers and toes may become achy or numb in colder weather. Ultimately, the WA will make the final determination. Send DoDMERB the information you have now with a letter from the doctor describing the condition and how there's no treatment required. In the mean time, I would find specialist and make an appointment.

    I suspect this was flagged because DoDMERB wants to ensure this isn't a secondary acrocyanosis diagnosis.

    Good luck!
     
  19. lillian

    lillian Candidate

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    Actually, fortunately, acrocyanosis is neither painful or achy in cold weather...just blue and a bit cold. That's one of the ways to tell it's not Raynaud's.

    I called DoDMERB and faxed them the report.

    I can't find a internal medicine specialist that will make an appointment without a referral, but my doctor did refer me to a cardiologist and told me I could schedule an appointment if I wanted to. Should I do that?
     
  20. lillian

    lillian Candidate

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    I've been looking, but I can't find anything in the medical regulations that really applies. 'Cyanosis' is a really general term and is a little but different although it is related.

    Thank you!! :) I'll keep everybody updated!
     

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