BMI/BCA question

Discussion in 'Merchant Marine Academy - USMMA' started by 2013Parent, May 11, 2009.

  1. 2013Parent

    2013Parent Member

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    Our little boy is off the chart for height and weight. He was during Dodmerb and he passed everything with flying colors. HOWEVER, we would like to know what method is being used during INDOC to screen body fat percentage. The "Logging In" document says "Tape Measure Measurement"

    There are seveal tape measure methods out there. Which one/What does KP use?

    He is 72" and 227lbs. The max is 207 according to the chart. He weighed more during the Dobmerb physical and it's on his chart. No where do we see the fat percentage being noted. I may be over reacting, but he is more concerned than I am...... started running more and eating less. May be less of a problem in July, but still would like to know. He is able to do all max situp and push ups, fairly slow runner, but he is just big and strong........not really fat. OL/DL football guy.
     
  2. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    The Academy bases their program off of the Navy's PRT program which is laid out in OPNAV Instruction 6110.1H. You can look at a copy of this by either googling it or going to this link:

    http://doni.daps.dla.mil/Directives/06000%20Medical%20and%20Dental%20Services/06-100%20General%20Physical%20Fitness/6110.1H.pdf

    Don't look at the scoring system for the different ages and events as this is likely different at KP. Mainly look at the body compisition area which will give you the way you are taped and the max percentages. This will come to be a big deal as a first classman looking at commissioning.
     
  3. luv2fly

    luv2fly Member

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    Is he going to play football at Kings Point?

    If so I wouldn't worry about it.

    Look at the football roster for comparison.



    Luv2fly
     
  4. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    Remember, all of those people must meet commissioning standards, so it should be in the back of everyone's mind the closer they get to graduation.
     
  5. 2013Parent

    2013Parent Member

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    Thanks....just did the review of the Navy standard referenced....he comes up at 23% ......OVER ! Interesting chart.... he would be 23% even if he was two inches taller. That is ia little stange.

    Now our concern is more about the INDOC time......not graduation four years out. Possibly being sent home before the journey even begins. (that's what the Logging In document states)
     
  6. Texmom

    Texmom Member

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    Take a look at last year's indoc photos. There are some very large candidates in the pics.
     
  7. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    I wouldn't worry about that too much. I've never seen it happen(but I also haven't seen everything), especially with recruited athletes.
     
  8. wolfe834

    wolfe834 Member

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    We are now having the problem with our 1st classman. It's hard to believe that you make it through four years, under the radar, and now he may not graduate because of the change in the run times and being over 2% over. Good luck and make sure he stays on top of the weight issue.
     
  9. 2013Parent

    2013Parent Member

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    What were the "old" run times? When did the new ones come online?
     
  10. wolfe834

    wolfe834 Member

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    For 20 and older it was under 13:30. A couple of weeks ago, the run time was changed to under 12:00 for the mile and a half. I'm not sure why the times were changed, I've heard some reasons, but can't confirm any of them.
     
  11. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    Probably due to the 12:00 mark being the GOOD LOW category for those 20-24 and that is what is usually require to get a "passing" score for most schools around the fleet. Even my over 40 classmate at aviation preflight had to get below 12:00 to continue in the program.

    I'm not there so don't take that as the ultimate authority, there's always the "we're going to tell them it's 12, so that they push themselves and definitely make the slower time."
     
  12. wolfe834

    wolfe834 Member

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    He has really had a time of it. Inconsistencies in measurements for the BFP has been a real issue. I have seen a 5% difference in the way one officer measures the Mids as opposed to another. They are taking a very serious stance on this issue, more than I have seen in the past.
     
  13. 2013Parent

    2013Parent Member

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    Guess the best way to stay under the radar is work hard to get below the max weight on the chart. Then, the whole guess work of using a tape measure goes away. My guy will need to focus on this more than he has. Like everything else about this process ......he owns his future not, us, his parents.

    I talked with him last night and spelled out what the deal is and how this is a key ......now it is totally up to him. Acta non Verba!
    :thumb:
     
  14. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    The Department of Defense formula to compute body-fat percentage is somewhat complicated.

    For males, the formula is % body fat = 86.010 x log10(abdomen - neck) - 70.041 x log10(height) + 36.76.

    For females, the formula is % body fat = 163.205 x log10(waist + hip - neck) - 97.684 x log10(height) - 78.387.

    Measurements (Male)

    Abdomen. Measure abdominal circumference against the skin at the navel (belly button), level and parallel to the floor. Arms are at the sides. Record the measurement at the end of member's normal, relaxed exhalation. Round abdominal measurement down to the nearest ½ inch.

    Neck. Measure the neck circumference at a point just below the larynx (Adam's Apple) and perpendicular to the long axis of the neck. Do not place the tape measure over the Adam's Apple. Service member should look straight ahead during measurement, with shoulders down (not hunched). The tape will be as close to horizontal as anatomically feasible (the tape line in the front of the neck should be at the same height as the tape line in the back of the neck). Care should be taken so as not to involve the shoulder/neck muscles (trapezius) in the measurement. Round neck measurement up to the nearest ½ inch.

    Measurements (Female)

    Neck. Measure neck circumference at a point just below the larynx (Adam's Apple) and perpendicular to the long axis of the neck. The Service member should look straight ahead during measurement, with shoulders down (not hunched). Round the neck measurement up to nearest ½ inch.

    Waist. Measure the natural waist circumference, against the skin, at the point of minimal abdominal circumference, usually located about halfway between the navel and the lower end of the sternum (breast bone). When you cannot easily see this site, take several measurements at probable sites and use the smallest value. Be sure that the tape is level and parallel to the floor. The Service member's arms must be at the sides. Take measurements at the end of member's normal relaxed exhalation. Round the natural waist measurement down to the nearest ½ inch.

    Hip. Measure the hip circumference while facing the Service member's right side by placing the tape around the hips so that it passes over the greatest protrusion of the gluteal muscles (buttocks) as viewed from the side. Make sure the tape is level and parallel to the floor. Apply sufficient tension on the tape to minimize the effect of clothing. Round the hip measurement down to the nearest ½ inch.

    :cool:

    *from United States Military Body Fat Standards
    By Rod Powers, About.com
     
  15. 2013Parent

    2013Parent Member

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    Whew!

    Like I said earlier; "Better to get down under the chart maximums"
     
  16. wolfe834

    wolfe834 Member

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    Luigi...you da man! That was not how it was done on the last measurement.

    Thanks for providing that information.

    And I totally agree with 2013parent's statement about staying under the maximums. With some though, it's easier said than done.
     
  17. kevster

    kevster Member

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    What exactly are the commissioning standards that you all are refering to? Is it having to pass a physical test prior to graduation?
     
  18. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    The information from About.com is not correct for the Navy. The Navy follows the OPNAV Instruction which I linked earlier. The pertinent pages are in enclosure 6. Once the measurements are taken a "circumference value" is calculated and then you simply consult the table with height and circumference values as the entries.
     
  19. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    All of the services have their own charts.

    Aren't those values in the charts derived from using these formulas?
     
  20. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    May be, but I don't have the willpower to do the math on that. I would also hate to see someone do the math and have it come out different than what hte table says. My idea here is that when you have a primary source document, use it.
     

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