BMU bummer

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by hopeful1998, Oct 8, 2016.

  1. hopeful1998

    hopeful1998 Member

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    My sick plebe will not go to the BMU! He has an enlarged lymph node on his collarbone (2 weeks) and refuses to go. Is there any reason why we cannot send him to a private primary care doctor while he has the weekend off ? We maintained our medical insurance for him.
     
  2. hopeful1998

    hopeful1998 Member

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    My sick plebe will not go to the BMU! He had such a bad experience with their lack of attention earlier in the year, that he just will not go. Is there any reason why we cannot send him to a private primary care doctor while he has the weekend off ? We maintained our medical insurance for him.
     
  3. nuensis

    nuensis USNA 2016

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    Yes. All non-emergency care must be approved by Tricare, and they will direct him to receive care at the nearest Military Treatment Facility, which is NHC Annapolis, which is BMU.

    Rumors are rumors, the doctors and hospital corpsmen (L500 petty officers? I don't know anymore) at BMU are as capable as any. He needs to suck it up and go to BMU.
     
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  4. hopeful1998

    hopeful1998 Member

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    These are not rumors, this is from his own experience. He was ignored for almost 8 straight weeks, while extremely ill. He made numerous visits during which he got multiple directions to "come back when….( you hit another illness milestone)" Then when he would get that particular affect, they would send him home again with nothing.
     
  5. nuensis

    nuensis USNA 2016

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    And he should continue to go to BMU, especially if he's concerned that his status has gotten worse.

    Either way, one does not simply walk out in town and receive medical care. He can try calling Tricare and requesting a different provider, but I'm not sure how that will work out.
     
  6. Jcc123

    Jcc123 Member

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    Unless you think his life is in danger, I think you should let him/his chain of command make this decision.
     
  7. hopeful1998

    hopeful1998 Member

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    We're not asking the navy to pay for it, that's why we maintained insurance. According to our information we received in our packet, that's why they suggested for us to keep medical on him - To get medical care if you are ill when on leave.
     
  8. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

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    Yes he can go out on town and get care. I would recommend he doesn't. Here is why I think he should go to BMU... continuity of care. If he has something like pneumonia is he going to run out in town for all his check ups? No. He also needs to learn to be an adult for his medical issues and be persistent with medical. He is not on leave right now. Even on leave he should learn how to access tri care. Learning to be your best medical advocate is a necessary life skill. He needs to demand to get a doctor's appointment. He has been sick too long. I will say it is not uncommon for some Plebes to take a long time she shake the hack. Their entire immune systems get a shock and shake up from Plebe Summer. Some Plebe's also this early in the year forgo sleep when they shouldn't. Good luck.

    Edit... also if he believes he is not getting solid treatment tell him to go see his Chief. He will straighten it out on about 5 minutes with BMU.
     
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  9. hopeful1998

    hopeful1998 Member

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    I respect your opinion, hoops, and those are solid reasons. I'll take that into account
     
  10. Capt MJ

    Capt MJ Member

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    +1
     
  11. ktnatalk

    ktnatalk Sailor. Shipmate. Parent.

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    Or USMC Staff Sergeant or Gunny if that's what his company has been assigned.
     
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  12. Da_Chief

    Da_Chief New Member

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    As a Retired Navy Chief Corpsman, I can tell you I don't think you are getting the full story from your plebe. These folks are under A LOT of stress and don't want to fall behind. 9 times out of 10, it's for this reason. Marines are notorious for not wanting to be "BROKE" as they don't want the tag for this.

    "IF" he is getting the run around, tell him to go to his CPO. He/She will unscrew the system. But understand there are 4000 Mids there getting care not having this problem. I would not be surprised if he is just trying to "GUT" it out, but is calling home.

    Let the Navy Chief do his/her job. Direct him there. I hate to be blunt, but you're not in his chain of command any more. The Navy has to know what is going on with him. He has to report the visit to his chain if he goes out of the system, which in itself can cause problems.

    Hope this helps.

    D/C
     
  13. hopeful1998

    hopeful1998 Member

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    Haha, Chief, I'm not in his chain of command, I get the point. And yes, sometimes I think he'd rather die than to admit he needs to go to the doctor - his worst nightmare would to be on medical chit ( is that the term?) During this long illness he's only been SIQ for 2 days. Since this post, I've discussed with him the need to advocate for his own healthcare. This is something I've had to do MANY times for all 3 of my kids at some point in time. He sees it as being a "whiner" He's got a lot to learn in this area, but we're getting there.
     
  14. GrilledCheese94

    GrilledCheese94 Member

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    (1) Your Plebe is now a member of the Armed Forces of the United States of America...let it go!

    (2) For the love of all things holy why are you still paying for additional health care (see above)...

    (3) Really? For crying out loud let your Plebe grow up and advocate for him/herself!!!
     
  15. CaliNavyMom

    CaliNavyMom Member

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    I agree with all, especially number #2...If for any reason he Leaves the Academy, that is a QUALIFYING condition to put him BACK on your insurance because he lost coverage. He can use TriCare when he's at home.
     
  16. Navy Dad

    Navy Dad Member

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    I do not agree with (2).

    We were advised to keep DS on our medical insurance just in case. I cannot find where I received that information from quickly while I was reading this but, my understanding was that he was not in the military and fully covered in the case of a major medical issue until he is commissioned. If something major comes up he will be dismissed and dropped from Tricare and while your medical plan can start to cover him there more than likely will a significant set of charges that are not covered. I know this is worst case but I was told that this does happen and so if you can afford it you should not cancel your kids private insurance.
     
  17. GrilledCheese94

    GrilledCheese94 Member

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    Unless I'm wrong...and it's been a few years...

    Aren't MIDN considered Active Duty and shouldn't have to worry about TriCare?

    Doesn't the Military ID suffice for health care costs anywhere in CONUS?
     
  18. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

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    It is rare to leave USNA due to medical. And when I saw rare, talking 1-2 kids maybe. I witnessed a kid graduate in a wheel chair. They get far enough along USNA will let them graduate. The folks who I did see dismissed early for medical all fell in the mental health category. They are considered active duty and there are several lengthy steps it would take to dismiss them for medical. They would get to a stable state first and then VA would then take over coverage. Grilled Cheese yes, back in our day nearly every parent dropped us off their insurance. None of us had back up plan B deposits either. Things have changed. USNA recommends to keep them on insurance through at least Plebe Summer. I know certain major life changes allow policy changes, not sure if a child leaving active duty would be one or not. Each family has to make the decision to keep them or not.
     
  19. nuensis

    nuensis USNA 2016

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    Midshipmen are active duty Navy with all the benefits thereof. The fact that they are active duty Navy is what makes them eligible to earn and wear the National Defense Service Medal and other military awards and qualification badges while at the Academy.

    Healthcare is managed by Tricare CONUS and contracted out to International SOS OCONUS, but the policies are pretty much the same.

    Active duty members are enrolled in Tricare and must receive non-emergency care from their primary care manager, or have a referral from their primary care manager. To utilize services from other health insurance, active duty members must notify Tricare and receive authorization. For emergency care, Tricare must be notified after the fact. I was briefed these exact points by the RN at the Academy; they do apply to Midshipmen.

    Primary care managers can be changed, but Midshipmen are in a special category; I don't think they would be allowed to change their PCM from BMU to somewhere else.

    Definitely recommend talking to the CoC to see if they can't get things moving rather than trying to mess with Tricare coverage. However, I suspect this is more about the lack of faith in BMU and neglecting to go when symptoms worsen and less about the medical care received. I find it hard to believe that he really went to BMU with worsening symptoms for eight straight weeks and was told to kick rocks every time.

    I know some of the staff can be prickly at times, but they are far from being flat out quacks. They are a tiny clinic dealing with 4500 Midshipmen regularly and conduct precommissioning/commissioning/flight/summer training physicals far too early in the morning (so as to not interfere with morning practices) on a unending basis, I learned to forgive them for being a little humorless.

    Reference:

    32 CFR 199.17 (c)(1)
    Active duty members. Active duty members are required to enroll in Prime when it is offered. Active duty members shall have first priority for enrollment in Prime. Because active duty members are not CHAMPUS eligible, when active duty members obtain care from civilian providers outside the military medical treatment facility, the supplemental care program and its requirements (including § 199.16) will apply.

    32 CFR 199.16 (d)(2)
    Preauthorization by the Uniformed Services of each service is required for the supplemental care program except for services in cases of medical emergency (for which the definition in Sec. 199.2 shall apply) or in cases governed by the TRICARE Prime Remote program for active duty service members set forth in paragraph (e) of this section. It is the responsibility of the active duty members to obtain preauthorization for each service. With respect to each emergency inpatient admission, after such time as the emergency condition is addressed, authorization for any proposed continued stay must be obtained within two working days of admission.

    32 CFR 199.2
    Medical emergency. The sudden and unexpected onset of a medical condition or the acute exacerbation of a chronic condition that is threatening to life, limb, or sight, and requires immediate medical treatment or which manifests painful symptomatology requiring immediate palliative efforts to alleviate suffering. Medical emergencies include heart attacks, cardiovascular accidents, poisoning, convulsions, kidney stones, and such other acute medical conditions as may be determined to be medical emergencies by the Director, OCHAMPUS, or a designee. In the case of a pregnancy, a medical emergency must involve a sudden and unexpected medical complication that puts the mother, the baby, or both, at risk. Pain would not, however, qualify a maternity case as an emergency, nor would incipient birth after the 34th week of gestation, unless an otherwise qualifying medical condition is present. Examples of medical emergencies related to pregnancy or delivery are hemorrhage, ruptured membrane with prolapsed cord, placenta previa, abruptio placenta, presence of shock or unconsciousness, suspected heart attack or stroke, or trauma (such as injuries received in an automobile accident).
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2016
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  20. hopeful1998

    hopeful1998 Member

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    Cheese,

    My DS' big information packet we received with his letter of appointment devoted one page to answering the question of why we should keep personal medical coverage on our plebe. We took USNAs advice and kept it.

    I only got involved when (after 5 weeks of attempting to get an antibiotic) he called me. He's a barely 18 y/0 plebe. So, Get over yourself - he's a tough kid that does not cry wolf

    And to the others who questioned my sons story - he went to the BMU 3 times during this period and was only given over the counter Meds except for his pink eye. If you don't believe that, you're out of touch
     

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