Boots That Work/Don't Work

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by MNDad2015, Sep 21, 2011.

  1. MNDad2015

    MNDad2015 Member

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    Know this topic has been discussed on various other threads, so I thought it might be appropriate to start one soley for this topic. Appreciate all of the info already provided as to what might be looking into, avoided, etc.

    DS was issued a pair of McRae's. Says no problems. Between water portions of FLTC's and muck run in the rain at FTX last weekend, his feet were happy campers when he took his boots of before going to bed.:smile:
     
  2. Aglahad

    Aglahad Member

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    Nike-Stylish, light and have that tennis shoe wear (optimal garrison boots). Horrible for field conditions. Some turn their nose at them because they really don't look in regs..but they are.

    Danner- Soft and comfortable, will take a beating....Tend to be on the heavy/hot side

    Belleville- Good all around boot especially if you get the gortex. Kind of rigid and will form hot spots if it doesn't fit the boot perfectly

    Bates-Good boot no complaints, so far.

    Oakley- Awesome for a time in field and garrison conditions, however noticed breakdown rather quickly during wet/constant foot marches. High priced model didn't seem worth it after first experience.

    All the boots I have used so far.
     
  3. gonavy2015

    gonavy2015 Member

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    Anyone know which boots are light weight for distance running? My DS joined the endurance team and needs boots that can go the distance.
    TIA-
     
  4. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    I took some time today to look up reviews on both Oakley and Nike boots. Forget Oakley... the design from the past couple of years sucks. Nike however, seems to get universal praise for actually feeling like a running shoe, with two downsides: some Units won't accept them as regulation, and they do wear out faster than the heavier, thicker boots.

    The Nike's are only $130 too. A perfect 2nd pair of boots.
     
  5. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    There is one more thing to keep in mind when looking at boots. Individual battalions will allow certain boots, just make sure the boots you purchase will be allowed at LDAC or at summer schools such as Airborne and Air Assault. You don't want to break in a new pair of boots only to find you can't use them at the last minute.
     
  6. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    I'm bumping this b/c my daughter will be getting either the Nike SFB or the Belleville Khyber 360 lightweight Mountain Boot (ACU approved). Her ROTC Battalion issued her the Altama 3LC last August, but they gave her a lot of blisters at Spring FTX. The Khyber was approved for use West Point for this summer for the first time.

    Does anyone have any basis for comparing these two lightweight ACU boots? Has anyone tried both? Nike doesn't carry them at all in any of their "Nike Stores" so there is no way to try them on. Since both must be mail ordered, I am leaning toward buying the Khyber for my daughter since it is West Point approved this year.

    Any thoughts?
     
  7. AscoreD

    AscoreD Member

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    I wear the Nike SFB boots, but have not had an opportunity to wear the other ones. For what I can tell you about the nikes is that:
    1. There is no break in time (I wore them for the first time competing for the German Armed Proficiency badge where you get to ruck) My friend also wore these to airborne school and had no problems.
    2. If you do not have strong ankles... don't get them. There is not a lot of support in them.
    3. They are very lightweight and flexible as they tend to take after the Nike Free shoe model (I wear those running shoes as well).
    4. I've heard that occasionally the eyelets pop off, but has not happened to me yet.
    5. If you don't plan on getting a pair of winter boots as well (if you're trekking around in the snowy tundra), do not get these as they have no insulation.
     
  8. -Bull-

    -Bull- Member

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    As AscoreD said, Nike's can be bad for the ankles. They're light and if you take a wrong step in the field and don't have strong ankles, you could really mess them up. They do have a light comfortable fit, though.



    Blackhawks are also popular with myself and many other cadets in my BN. Comfortable and good strength.
     
  9. Jcleppe

    Jcleppe Member

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    Your right about the support, my son had a pair of the NIKE's, twisted his ankle during a workout running up and down stairs. He switched to the Blackhawks and no more trouble, they had much better ankle support.
     
  10. AscoreD

    AscoreD Member

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    The difference between a ribbed bottom like the Nike SFB boot and the bellevilles is that when the boot is ribbed on the bottom like that, it tends to make your feet work as though they are in a normal tennis shoe where you use your feet muscles a lot. This I find, makes it easier for endurance activities such as ruck marches as the stress is distributed throughout the legs/feet.

    When you have a more solid bottom from the bellevilles it tends to push the stress more towards the thigh muscles in order to displace the lack of movement and stress on the foot. I found this type of boot to be useful in environments where I am prone to falling or walking over tough terrain, For example: night land navigation where you occasionally find a pothole in the side of a mountain that you fall in.
     

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