"Captain" after NROTC?

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by Tcole, Aug 29, 2015.

  1. Tcole

    Tcole New Member

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    Hey there,
    I just wanted to get some more info about NROTC after graduating. My goal in the the navy would be to command a ship. What's the minimum rank in order to command any navy ship (Patrol, Cruisers, etc.)? Is it O-2? The reason Im asking is because I saw a CGA (coast guard academy) vid. and they said fresh grads command a boat within 2 years (O-2). I know there different branches but i wanted to now if the same thing is true with the navy.
    Thanks for your time,
    tcole
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2015
  2. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

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    No, not true in the Navy. Typical COs of Navy ships are O-5s. There are some smaller ships that have O-4s (or at least they used to) such a oilers. Also carriers are O-6s. Size of ships are different. Will let USCG folks speak to their ships and you can google destroyer, cruisers, amphib sizes.
     
  3. Tcole

    Tcole New Member

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    Hmm. Well I just watched a Navy recruitment vid. Link below. It says at 0:41 in the vid. that you can command a sub in you mid twenties. Thats around O-3 I think! Don't believe me, watch the vid.
     
  4. flieger83

    flieger83 Super Moderator Moderator

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    No submarine skipper in the US Navy is in his 20's. Do just a little research and you'll find all the navy's submarine's websites...and the CO's are pretty much all Commander's (0-5) grade.

    The officer "taking charge of a covert nuclear sub in their mid 20's" might be the "officer of the deck" which is a watch standers duty. They represent the captain when he isn't on the bridge and they have been given "the Conn."

    Just an example...checkout this change of command from last week in SUBLANT.

    http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=90719


    Steve
    USAFA ALO
    USAFA '83
     
  5. Pima

    Pima Parent

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    Just my opinion, but that was media BS.

    Paraphrasing....imagine taking control of a sub.... that does not mean you are in COMMAND. Two different things.
    ~ I also agree that would be an O3 position.
    ~ They state mid 20's. That would be O3. Commission at 22, you would be an O3 at 26.

    Did you ever think that it might mean someone is letting you take the controls, but they are sitting over your shoulder the entire time? You might have the controls, but like I said earlier that does not equate to being in Command.

    There is a lot of training that has to occur over years before you become in command.

    If you believe that you will be in Command of anything when you are in your twenties, or even early 30s, than I have a great piece of land in Florida, it is a little wet, but with enough truckloads of dirt, the water table/level issue will not be a problem! I also have a great bridge in NY to sell to you, titling might be iffy, but just give me time and it will be all yours.

    xposted with flieger
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2015
  6. Spud

    Spud BGO

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    Every ship/sub has a rotating team of officers and enlisted sailors who "control" the movements of the ship during regular shifts that rotate around the clock, 24 hours a day, called "Bridge Watches". There is a rigorous training schedule to qualify officers to be the "Underway Officer of the Deck" that involves everything from written tests to hundreds of hours spent on the bridge in on-the-job-training. The designation is given by the Commanding Officer (CO) himself, who is probably an O-5 or Commander. It means he has utmost confidence in the ability of the designated officer such that the CO can go to bed at night and sleep knowing that the officer can control and command the ships movements as well as the CO himself can and can handle any emergency that can come up. It is a tremendous responsibility that is not given easily by the CO and is prized by the junior officer. That is what that video film clip is referring to. I can also assure you the CO sleeps not 10 feet from the bridge and his standing orders to the young officer is "wake me immediately if anything changes" from the night sailing orders. During the day, the same thing occurs with the CO prowling around the ship and off the bridge doing everything he needs to with the control still being done by another young officer on the bridge with another Bridge Watch team.The CO seldom takes control of the ship on the bridge unless it is a really touchy maneuver that he wants to do (coming into port and alongside a pier is the classic example) or he wants to demonstrate to an officer in training how to do something. The best COs are constantly teaching and coaching his/her officers on ship handling and the worst won't let them do anything.

    The most junior true Commanding Officers I have ever heard of were O-2s on Swift Boats, O-3s on the various WHECs and metal gunboats that cruised rivers and coasts, and the old minesweepers during the Vietnam war, none of which exist anymore.

    Since you are looking for information about a Navy junior officer duties (same with CG too) let me elaborate a bit on what that young officer does on a daily basis. Every Navy officer has at least two major jobs---one is your "day job" as a division officer in charge of about 15-30 enlisted sailors and has the title like Gunnery Officer, Torpedo Officer, Damage Control Officer, Communications Officer and so on. You have a senior enlisted person such as a Chief or First Class to help you run the division. The second job you have is on one of the rotating Bridge Watches noted above. Your day is interesting as you may be on the Bridge Watch from midnight to 4am, you get to hit the rack for 2 hours but then are standing in front of your division to begin a normal workday. You may go back on the Bridge Watch from noon to 4pm, get off to finish up what you couldn't do while you were gone that afternoon , eat and hit the rack as you will be woken at 3:30am to be back on the Bridge at 4am. You get off the Bridge at 6am but no rack this time as your work day starts again at 7-7:30am and you want to eat too. There is no excused time to take a little nappy-poo during the day as everybody is on the same rotations. As a junior officer you always get lots of extra duties like Classified Material Custodian, Ship's Historian, Mess Officer just to fill any extra minutes you may have laying around. Now mix all this in with gunnery exercises, chasing subs (or vice versa), coming alongside carriers and oilers, maneuvering in large formations, fire drills, flooding drills, and losing electrical power such that everything is pitch dark, and the days really fly by. You will be plenty busy learning the ropes for many exciting years before Uncle Sam trusts you with a ship and one of the biggest things will be how well you lead, train, take care of, and the performance of your enlisted troops. Welcome Aboard Ensign.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2015
    FalconsRock, EDelahanty and kinnem like this.
  7. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    Don Juan of Austria was only 24 when he was admiral of the Spanish fleet at the battle of Lepanto in 1571, so don't let anyone tell you it can't be done.

    You should know, however, that although he was something of a bastard, it probably didn't hurt his career that he was a half-brother to King Philip II of Spain.
     
  8. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    I think the Navy brochure might be referring to the early 1900s when Ensign Chester Nimitz was given command of a destroyer for a few weeks.
     
  9. USMCGrunt

    USMCGrunt Member

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    There can be rare situations that create a "command" situation (battlefield injuries, rotational gaps, etc). But the closest a junior officer comes to this type of "command" is by watches as the "Officer of the Day" or "Officer of the Deck."
     
  10. majstlo

    majstlo Member

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    The Coast Guard is unique because they operate many small patrol boats with crews of as few as a dozen people. Some of their 87 foot cutters are commanded by a LTJG (O-2), all of the 110 foot cutters are commanded by a LT (O-3).
     
  11. LineInTheSand

    LineInTheSand USCGA 2006

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    Most of the 110's are commanded by LT. At least one (and maybe more) have had CWO commanding officers. The 87' without LTJG commanding officers tend to be in difficult areas where the experience of a SCPO or MCPO is more appropriate.
     

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