Chances of getting in, and chances of getting medically disqualified for asthma?

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by ANA cadet, Sep 9, 2012.

  1. ANA cadet

    ANA cadet New Member

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    GPA: 4.48 Weighted, 4.0 Un-weighted
    SAT: 760 math, 680 writing, 700 reading (total 2140)
    Sports: 4 year varsity Swimming, 2 year varsity water polo
    Extra-curriculars: 4 years in military school with honor unit with distinction, high positions in jrotc (first sergeant now and hopefully battalion staff or company commander or executive officer next year), 200 hour community service, and 4 years of band

    My main worry is, however, a small history of asthma. I have never, in my life, had an asthma attack, and have never had asthma symptoms since I was 9 or 10; and my doctor diagnosed me with asthma and prescribed to me an inhaler at that time. I have never needed that inhaler and have always been capable of performing in sports and have never had an asthma attack. If the diagnosis is before the age of 13 do I have to report it? And if I do, what are the chances of me getting a waiver?

    Thanks in advance:biggrin:
     
  2. pilot2b

    pilot2b Candidate Appointee

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    Unusual forum for me to post in, but I thought I'd pop on in here. First, I highly doubt your resume will affect the outcome very much. Since you haven't had asthma after the age of 12, you won't receive an automatic dismissal, but you still have to report it on the DoDMERB form online, if I remember right. There will be ample directions online when you fill out the form. I have no idea about the chances of a waiver, if needed.
     
  3. dlee96

    dlee96 Member

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    the only person who really knows about your waiver is your DODMERB doctor.

    Other than that, your GPA and SATs look good, sports will help. I suggest more leadership positions (clubs, swimming/H2O polo captain?). The JROTC 1st Sergeant looks good and the military school will most likely help (shows dedication)
     
  4. buff81

    buff81 Moderator

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    The process is-
    After a DoDMERB DQ, the waiver request comes from the candidate's RC. If the RC does in fact request a waiver ( which he will usually do IF the candidate has a complete file and is competitive) then the docs at WP will makes a recommendation to the admission's committee to grant or deny the waiver.

    RE the OP's question: waivers have been granted for asthma DQs. Waivers have been denied for asthma DQs. It depends on your specific case. One red flag is if you are still prescribed an inhaler. The thought being that if you don't need an inhaler, then why are you still prescribed one. If it's a 'just in case I need it' reason then that indicates that someone is concerned that there is a chance that you could have an asthma attack.
    Answer the questions honestly and let the process flow.
     
  5. jrangitsch

    jrangitsch J Rangitsch, USMA'83

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    Asthma prescriptions are probably the most common issue that comes up in DODMERB reviews.

    Waivers have been granted for Asthma "findings" - so don't give up hope. The previous posts do give accurate summations of the process and all that.

    If you have not had any issues with Asthma, just go through the steps to get a waiver.

    Waivers are requested by the Regional Commander on your behalf. If you have complete (or almost so - the more complete, the better) file, good numbers - class rank, sports, extracurriculars, SAT / ACT etc...

    In a nutshell - Asthma does raise a red flag, but it is not a deal breaker as long as you can perform the duties required of a cadet as displayed by your application....
     
  6. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    Do you really have Asthma or Asthma like symptoms?

    Asthma is one of the disqualifying conditions that waivers are not usually granted.

    A doctor told me that now days it's easier to perscribe inhalers to treat the symptom that orderding an expansive test (metacholine test) to see if a patient actually has an asthma or not.
     

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