changing major

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by jamesb, May 9, 2013.

  1. jamesb

    jamesb Member

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    okay so I received a 3 year scholarship for AROTC but the problem is I want to change my major from the one I wrote down when I applied for the scholarship. I wrote down biology for my major a year ago when I started the scholarship process but after thinking it through I wanted to change into a business major. Will I lose my scholarship if I change my major?
     
  2. Nick0726

    Nick0726 Member

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    I don't think so. At least in terms of the Navy and Air Force Tier system, Biology and Business are both considered non-technical. But I was wondering the same thing, it'd be great if someone chimed in!
     
  3. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    You may be able to change it without losing the scholarship, but you will need permission to change it in any case. You'll have to speak with your cadre. Since I'm sure your core requirements will include a science I suggest you start with the first biology course and also the first business course. I assume the remainder will focus on core requirements. That should give you the autumn to work it out before you enroll for your spring classes. And in any case, if you then decide to stick with Biology for the sake of the scholarship if its necessary, you're covered.

    EDIT: Depending on your college, you may need permission from them as well. If you are at a major university, the business school is usually separate from the school of Arts and Sciences - which necessitates the need for their permission. I'm assuming you indicated to the college that you planned on majoring in Biology as well.
     
  4. MomWPgirl

    MomWPgirl Member

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    Make sure you get permission from leadership in your detachment...in writing. My son was a 3 year scholarship AFROTC with plans to major in Russian (an AF desired major at the time). At the end of his freshman year he decided to switch majors to communications. He asked the leadership in his detachment for guidance in regards to his scholarship and was assured it wasnt a problem. Lo and behold, after classes had started soph year he was told they were mistaken but would put him in for an "IN College" scholarship. Unfortunately, his detachment like many that year were not given any of those slots for scholarships. There was no way he could switch classes and still graduate in 4 years... thus in turn he lost his scholarship. He remained in AFROTC, received a stipend, is presently a 2nd LT BUT...he is now paying Mom and Dad back for the amount lost in scholarship. He was at expensive private school and he opted to stay and pay us back rather than transfer.
     
  5. gojack

    gojack ....

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    For Army ROTC, you will need to fill out a CCF 104-R and get it signed off on, every semester.

    Changing your major (Bio>Business) should not affect your scholarship. The Army is primary interested in you completing a degree in the four years allowed. If you were enrolled in a specialized scholarship; nursing, language etc., it could affect your eligibility for scholarship funds.

    But you must have your class plan w/a declared major (CCF-104-R) signed/approved each semester.
     
  6. jamesb

    jamesb Member

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    thank you all for the information. Should I be contacting leadership at my detachment now? because if I am unable to change my major without losing my scholarship I will most likely have to change schools due to the incredible price of my school.
     
  7. Nick0726

    Nick0726 Member

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    Yeah, dude, contact them!
     
  8. Thompson

    Thompson Member

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    I'm a bit lost here. For my scholarship, I declared Aerospace engineering - and I am switching to mechanical engineering. When I went to speak with the cadre about switching aero to mechanical they said that was fine. They did not, however, mention anything about filling out the CCF 104-R form. Is this something I need to worry about before freshman year, or something when the fall semester starts?

    I'm going up for college orientation/scheduling in a couple weeks. Is this form something I need to get squared away before my college orientation? (Since, for PSU I also declared aerospace engineering)

    ... and also, I don't need to have all 4 years already planned out? Just semester to semester so my PMS can sign off?
     
  9. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    You need to plan out all 4 years... at least my son does. But you don't need to name the specific courses... just History, Social Science, Fine Art, etc. Something that shows your addressing your requirements, both core and major. Of course the next semester should be more specific and some of the courses in the semester after that should be specific. You're really trying to show you can successfully graduate in the time allotted.
     
  10. gojack

    gojack ....

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    ^^^
    as above, not to worry, your cadre will walk you through it.
    the point is you must have an approved major and class plan/schedule
    every semester, and that is where you make any changes to your major.
     
  11. goaliedad

    goaliedad Parent

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    The purpose of the 104-R is to have a plan to complete the degree stated in the time allotted. Most majors are allowed only 4 years to complete. Some are given 5 depending upon the requirements of the university.

    You will need to plot out your degree requirements for the full 4 or 5 years granted for your degree, each and every semester (as plans change based upon your ability to get into the courses planned, etc.). Your adviser as well as your cadre will sign off on this plan.

    You will receive a 104-R to be completed when you arrive on campus (if not before). My suggestion for you is to go to your college's website, find the course catalog for your year of matriculation (entry). You will find the degree requirement for your major therein. It will have the core requirements for your major as well as the general education requirements for the school. And it will have a listing for each and every course offered detailing the (general ed) requirements satisfied, prerequisite courses (things that need to be completed before taking a course), and how many credit hours and when it is offered.

    You will take this information and put together the schedule contained in your 104R. You will be expected to average at least 15 credit hours per term or 120 hours during the first 4 years of your enrollment. You may find that your degree requirements (including general ed) + your ROTC credits (may or may not satisfy general ed requirements depending upon institution) is greater than 120. This is something that you will need to discuss with your cadre. If it is only a 6 or 9 credit hours, you may be expected to take a heavier load or take classes during mini-terms or summer. Or they may allow an extra semester or 2 to complete.

    When you lay out your schedule, start with the class sequences that have the longest chain of prerequisites. Typically, this will be your math and/or Physics coursework. Fill in around this with other core requirements (ones that have a specific course number without any options) and of course your MS classes. You will find that MS classes take up your entire slack of elective credits and perhaps even more.

    I would recommend finding a 104-R online (someone will chime in with a link soon enough). Do as much of this as you can before you go to your freshman orientation, where you will more than likely have an hour or 2 with an adviser. Typically, for most freshmen, they go lightly over the whole degree requirement, but only plan out your freshman year in this setting. Bring your 104-R filled out with you (hopefully your cadre will have sent you one before your orientation but bring your own if not). Match it up with what your adviser recommends and make adjustments as necessary. There probably won't be much in your first year because 3 of your courses will be Math, Physics, Chem. They may have an engineering overview course (depending upon the institution) as a requirement of entering freshmen as well. What I am saying here is that there shouldn't be too much to adjust when you see your adviser if you have done your homework on your degree requirements and filled out your 104-R.

    Bottom line, the 104-R is your academic plan. And if you haven't had this drilled into your head yet, a failure to plan is a plan for failure. If you can plan something, do so.
     
  12. Thompson

    Thompson Member

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    Thank you to the three of you for the insightful information! Luckily for me - PSU lays out a suggested academic plan that I found a while back, so figuring out the 4 years shouldn't be to big a problem. For the 104-R form; does CC want just the course type, or the course name/number if available?

    When you said that if my degree requirements exceeds 120, why is this an issue? From PSU's website, it is 113 credits minimum (w/o ROTC credits). Will that also be an issue if I wanted to do minors as well (Military Science, Engineering Leadership Development)?

    Also a bit confused by what you mean by the 6/9 credit statement.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2013
  13. goaliedad

    goaliedad Parent

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    6 to 9 credits - If your degree requires 126 to 129 credits (including your ROTC), you may or may not be granted an extra semester to complete your degree. More than likely yes, but not guaranteed.

    As to minors, you won't get extra semesters to complete them. If you only need 113 for the degree (w/o ROTC), you may end up requiring an extra term, if your MS classes go 1 credit for MS1 level, 2 credits for MS2 level, and 3 credits for MS3/4 level classes. That would be 18 credits, which puts you at 131. There probably are upper classmen who have been where you are going and you will probably get a clue as to where your path goes from them.

    As to the 104-R, you can plug in any course that satisfies a requirement - if you need a Fine Art, you can plug in a Music class and later take a Theater class that meets the same requirement. That is how my daughter has played things. Basically, it shows that you have a plan to meet the requirements - plans get changed all the time in the heat of battle. Don't feel that the plan is set in concrete - more like whip cream.
     

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