childhood cancer waiver

Discussion in 'DoDMERB' started by WarEagle01, Aug 5, 2011.

  1. WarEagle01

    WarEagle01 New Member

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    Hey everyone, I found the contact info for the DoDMRB help desk in this forum and sent them the question below. That was several months ago and haven't heard anything back. I'm sure they're pretty busy with other requests for info, so I thought I would post it here to see if anyone might be able to help. Thanks.

    My question concerns my son’s future plans for Army ROTC. He’s currently a senior in high school and would like to obtain a commission through ROTC. Unfortunately, he was diagnosed with A.L.L. leukemia a few years back. He’s doing quite well, is in remission and is currently in the maintenance stage of chemotherapy. His doctors predict a full recovery and he should be off his chemo drugs next year. My question then is, is this is a show-stopper? Are waivers for prior cancer something that DodMRB routinely rejects out of hand? I think it’s best we find out sooner rather than later in order to minimize the disappointment and get him vectored on another career path. I was unable to find anything in AR 40-501 regarding blood cancers, although I seem to remember reading something about a five-year rule regarding the possibility of a waiver if the applicant has been in remission for five-years. Apparently, that five-year rule has been deleted in the current guidance. Any information you can provide or any other source of information would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    I'm by no means an expert in Army reg's; however, my guess is that ALL would fall under the 'tumors' section although it traditionally isn't thought of as a "tumor".

    In all I would say that you are facing an uphill battle. A hx of cancers other than some skin cancers is usually tough to overcome. I personally have not heard an example such as this to even be able to give a decent answer as to the chance of a waiver.

    If it were me/my son I would have a terrific plan B going, and still apply for AROTC. You never know!
     
  3. WarEagle01

    WarEagle01 New Member

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    Thanks Doc

    I appreciate the response.
     
  4. WarEagle01

    WarEagle01 New Member

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    OK, found the 5-year reference

    It was in the old (and now canceled) DOD Directive 6130.4:
    "In addition, the following cases should be qualified, if on careful review they meet the following criteria: individuals who have a history of childhood cancer and who have not received any surgical or medical cancer therapy for 5 years and are free of cancer;"
    The new reg, 6130.03, completely eliminated any reference to childhood cancer. I wonder why?
     
  5. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    Unfortunately don't have time to go look at the directives you quote, but based on the numbering they may be two different, but similar, directives.

    Normally if something in the military is slightly changed it will either keep the same number, or add a letter such as OPNAV6110.1(I) or I think sometimes the decimal point will increase a bit.

    I haven't seen a change such as the one you mention (go from .4 to .03)

    Who knows why the change if it is true. Might be further research came out that they decided made things more/less likely to get a waiver. Or they didn't want to handcuff themselves with the 5 year reference. In reality though I don't think I've ever read DOD directives when it came to medical enlistment/commissioning standards. Each service has always had their own. Not sure why the DOD would have one on that particular subject.
     

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