Class 2019 Welcome Brief

Discussion in 'Military Academy - USMA' started by oldcorpsdad, Jul 1, 2015.

  1. oldcorpsdad

    oldcorpsdad Member

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  2. re-applicant2020

    re-applicant2020 New Member

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    Just some words of advice for any first time applicants, I was a QNS candidates for the co/2019. My SAT two-part was 50 points higher than the average and my ACT was three points above the average. Just remember to try your best in all parts of the application as scores above the average do not guarantee an appointment.
     
  3. mom3boys

    mom3boys Parent

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    Admission is way more than an SAT/ACT score. Please contact your RC and ask what specifically he/she suggests you do to improve your chances for an appointment next year.
     
  4. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    Yes and no as SAT/ACT matters. Had a kid with 1400+ SAT (not inlcuding writing) not get in. He had good leadership and sports. However, I have seen not many candidates with low SAT/ACT (say below 1200) get in.
     
  5. mom4boys

    mom4boys Member

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    My c/o 2019 was a re-applicant and that extra year was the best thing for him! He was more mature and better prepared this year. The fact that he wanted to go badly enough to re-apply shows me he is focused. Good luck!
     
  6. mom3boys

    mom3boys Parent

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    I meant it is way more than simply test scores. Everyone who is admitted is bringing something unique to the table. Maybe someone is an amazing athlete, but ACT is weak. Maybe someone has an amazing SAT, but CFA is on the low side, or had only band...USMA uses the WCS for a reason. Don't discount standardized test scores, but do not rely solely on them either.
     
  7. gstudent99

    gstudent99 Member

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    oldcorpsdad - Just to clarify. I think you mixed up one of the stats.

    The 1254 SAT avg and the 22% female is for the of the Class of 2019
    The 23 grads going to med school is for the class of 2015.
     
  8. DJA

    DJA Member

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    According to the admissions information released this is the lowest SAT score in the last 3 years ( and maybe ever) at 1254. The 2 years before were 1287 and 1266 according to USMA admissions.
    According to the Army ROTC, 4 year scholarship winners SAT scores for the last 3 years for 2016-18 classes were 1267, 1253 and 1247 which averages to 1256.
     
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  9. DJA

    DJA Member

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    Correction - all AROTC scholarship winners averaged 1256 over the last 3 years. The 4 year winners average was above 1256 and USMA.
     
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  10. luckydoggy1234

    luckydoggy1234 Member

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    Sorry if this is off topic but MemberLG it seems like you have a bit of experience with the application process, but have you ever seen a 1500+ SAT get rejected for either USMA or ROTC?
     
  11. bookreader

    bookreader Member

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    I"m not MemberLG but there are 3 parts to the application. If an applicant had stellar SAT/ACT scores but no examples of leadership (or only weak examples) or very little team sports then that person would not be a competitive applicant. They look for so much more than just standardized test scores.

    Maybe your question implied excellent leadership and team sports.
     
  12. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    I am a FFR, state FFR coordinator, and doing this for awhile. I can view selected information on all applicants from my state.

    Don't keep track of who get rejected, but remember a kid with 1440 getting rejected for USMA with top 1% class rank. Also remember a kid with 1460 not getting a medical wavier request submitted.

    One thing I usually tell candidates is that there is no extra credit in WCS. Typically, the candidate with the highest WCS in the cateogory gets the appointment. The WCS is about 60% academic, 30% leadership, and 10% physical. Most candidates like to focus on their strength - something like if you are good with standardized test, you take it multiple times; good leadership, look for more leadership opportunties; and in good shape take the CFA again. However, if you are close to maxing your sports portion of your leadership grade (i.e. team captain, winning a state title, being named all American), playing another sports will generate minimum additional WCS points. So I advise candidates focus on your weak areas, especailly if the weak area is academics. In a typical Congressiona district, the competition is among well round candidates for the appointment, not between a candidate strong in academics but not so strong leaderhsip against a candidate not so strong in academics but strong in leadership.

    A simple example, for discussion puprose, WCS equals 100 points, with academic 60 points, leadership 30 points. The CFA will stay constant, C.

    Candidate A is 90 percentile in academics and leaderhip, so 60*(.9) + 30*(.9) + C = 81 + C
    Candidate B is 92 percentile in academics and 80 precentile on leadership, so 60*(.92) + 30*(.85) + C = 80.7 + C
    Candidate C is 80 percentile in academics and 100 pcerential on leaderhsip, so 60*(.8) + 30*(1) + C = 78 + C

    Candidate A has the highest WCS.

    This is very simplitic model, but we cannot create a better model because we don't know the exact point values, but the point is that a well rounded candidate beats not well rounded candidates.
     

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