Class of 2015 Service Selection

Discussion in 'Naval Academy - USNA' started by NavyHoops, Nov 20, 2014.

  1. NavyHoops

    NavyHoops Moderator

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    Congrats to 2015 on receiving your service assignments. Best of luck as you finish out your year and move on to the fleet. Regardless of what you received, remember those sailors and Marines don't care what you wanted to do, all they care about is you leading them. Embrace your future, learn as much as you can and be the best Officer you can be. Enjoy the last few months, they are some of the best at USNA. Below are the stats USNA posted for Service Assignment.

    Surface Warfare: 251
    Submarines: 137
    SEAL: 30
    Explosive Ordnance Disposal: 15
    Navy Pilot: 243
    Naval Flight Officer: 79
    Medical: 12
    Supply: 11
    Civil Engineering Corps: 5
    Intel: 10
    Information Warfare: 7
    Information Professional: 4
    Oceanography: 1
    Navy Total: 805

    USMC Ground: 177
    USMC Pilot: 89
    USMC Flight Officer: 5
    USMC Total: 271
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2014
  2. falconchic88

    falconchic88 Member

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    Congrats to all! What an exciting time!
     
  3. CAmom2015

    CAmom2015 Member

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    DS is happy to be a future SWO! Looking forward to the fun of ship selection night! Most company mates received the service assignment they wanted. A few are meeting the "needs of the Navy".
     
  4. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

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    Yes, "needs of the Navy" is code for not getting what you wanted.

    I don't think there are too many surprises when service assignments are doled out. Towards the end, some of the midshipmen realize that their dream to become a SEAL, Marine, pilot, or whatever - is not going to happen for one reason or another. Maybe they got through SEAL screening but were clearly not one of the top players. Maybe their performance at Leatherneck was mediocre. Maybe their scores on the ASTB (Aviation Selection Test Battery) were very poor. Many of the midshipmen adjust their preferences in the final stretch to reflect what they are realistically going to get. It's not really their "first" choice - it's their only choice. It's what's leftover.

    But, after over 3 years at the Naval Academy, "the die is cast" and there is no longer any opportunity to turn back time and retake that Chemistry final you bombed your Plebe year /or/ retake those less-than-stellar PRTs /or/ develop better relationships with your peers.

    Some of these midshipmen readjust their preferences with these realities in mind then proudly claim "I got my first choice!"

    As Jeff Goldblum's character said in the movie The Big Chill: "I don't know anyone who could get through the day without two or three juicy rationalizations." Oftentimes, it's what helps us maintain our sanity and happiness.
     
  5. SpadGuy

    SpadGuy Member

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    to be doctors or as what?
    Will the Navy sent them to http://www.usuhs.mil/ or any medical school?

     
  6. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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  7. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

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    Basically, the midshipmen selected for the Medical Corps by the Naval Academy's Medical Selection Board are qualified for two military scholarships. One is USUHS (Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences) which is located in Bethesda, MD. This is the pure military route. While going through medical school, these students are Ensigns on full military pay and benefits. Their commitment (in addition to the five they owe for attending USNA) is seven years. Therefore, their total service obligation is 12 years. The clock for this commitment doesn't start ticking until after they finish their residency.

    Then there is HPSP (Health Professions Scholarship Program). Their medical education is at a civilian university. These students get a $20,000 bonus upon graduation and are immediately released from all military duty and obligations. They do not get military pay or benefits. All their medical school tuition, books and equipment is paid for and they are given a monthly stipend. (currently $2157.30). Their commitment (in addition to the five they owe for attending USNA) is four years. Therefore, their total service obligation is 9 years. [Note: HPSP students are on full military pay and benefits for 6 weeks of each year during medical school. Plus, on occasion, they get "uniform allowances" thrown into their pay.]

    Of course, in both cases, whether going the USUHS or HPSP route, they must get accepted into the medical school just as all those seeking a medical education must do. I don't think USUHS has ever turned down an academy graduate (there is probably an exception out there) but the civilian colleges certainly do.

    The midshipmen who are selected into the Medical Corps can go to any medical school to which they've been accepted.

    Upon graduation from medical school, they will automatically be promoted to the rank of Lieutenant (O-3).

    There is no minimum quota for the Medical Corps. There is a maximum limit, however. If nobody applies to the program, the academy will send zero into the Medical Corps. This is in great contrast to the other communities. For instance, if the submarine community needs 135 midshipmen from the academy and only 127 have preferenced it - they will get the additional 8 midshipmen to enter that program, one way or the other.

    Recent history indicates the academy (actually the Navy) seems to have established a limit of 10 for the Medical Corps. They have sent less. However, I noticed that they sent 12 with the class of 2014 indicating that there is some flexibility if the applicants are particularly outstanding.

    By the way, both USMA and USAFA send double the number into the medical field as USNA. If you want to attend a service academy and be a military doctor, the Naval Academy is the route that affords an aspiring doctor the lowest odds of achieving this.
     
  8. SpadGuy

    SpadGuy Member

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    Thanks Memphis

    I saw those USUHS q/a in another BBS (lost url sorry).

    - She will only be accepted if she has committed to service either in the army, Navy, AF, or Public Health Services. Is she interested in the medical school, nursing school, or other? She did not have to be in the military or PHS at the time of application, but she will be expected to serve either in the military or PHS after graduating. Prior service is not a highly-weighted factor in deciding who gets into the program, so her current civilian status should not hurt her chances at being accepted.

    - I went to USUHS for medical school and am very happy with that choice. She will incur a 7 year service commitment if she attends.

    - civilian status doesn't really have much of a bearing on being accepted. In my class about 50% were civilians right off the street. A number of the "prior service" individuals were from ROTC or the service academies - which really isn't prior service. She will get to do things in that school that she won't be able to at any other school, such as work with the White House Medical Unit for a summer, as a medical student.

    - USUHS students get a livable wage during medical school, whereas HPSP students at civilian medical schools get a $1000 per month stipend (plus books, fees, tuition). This is why the HPSP incurs only a 4 year service commitment instead of 7.

    - http://www.usuhs.mil/medschool/admissions/faq.html#9
    There is a difference among the services. Applicants are not required to make a decision regarding service until the day of the interview, but USU recommends applicants research each well in advance. Information about the Army, Air Force, Navy and Public Health Service can be found on their home Web sites. At the interview, applicants are provided a form asking them to rank the services in order of preference and their commitment to each. Interviewees will be given briefings about the services and the admissions staff will be available for questions. HPSP is something to look into as well. Very important for one to research the opportunities each service provides. The Navy and Army are more competitive for residency slots and you are more likely to have to serve time as a general physician or GMO before getting into a speciality program.

    - Nick, that last part that you wrote is partially incorrect. In the Army, you will go right to a residency following med school. It's a pretty rare occurrence that one spends time as a GMO in the Army. The decision was made by Big Army a while ago to field residency trained physicians as their BN and Brigade Surgeons, in the thought that they would provide better care. The Navy is a bit different. From an outsider's perspective, their doctors usually had to do a "utilization tour" after their intern year, prior to starting residency.
     
  9. Memphis9489

    Memphis9489 Parent

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    The HPSP stipend is currently set at $2157.30 - not $1000.

    You also have to factor in that, for 6 weeks, the HPSP students get the same pay as the USUHS students. That's a nice pay boost for a month-and-a-half.

    Also, the incentive bonus of $20,000 is only given to the HPSP students, not the USUHS students.

    If one is inclined to get out of the military as soon as possible - the HPSP route is the way to go because the commitment is nearly half that of USUHS.

    If one is married with children, the HPSP route can be a challenge because the stipend is certainly lower than Ensign pay. (NOTE: Your pay is at the O-1 level while at USUHS, regardless of time-in-service.) But if you're a young, single kid right out of college, especially a college at which you accrued zero debt, like a service academy, the HPSP stipend is plenty. Plus, the freedoms afforded over USUHS can be quite attractive. You can come and go as you please. For all practical purposes, you're a civilian during your four years of medical school.

    Historically, the majority of Medical Corps selectees from USNA choose HPSP.
     
  10. kp2001

    kp2001 USMMA Alumnus

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    This changed after I graduated (unfortunately not before). At USUHS prior officers retain the pay level at which they entered; however, revert back to the rank of Ensign. Those with prior enlisted time get paid the appropriate O1-E level.

    Granted this doesn't apply to most Academy applicants.

    Sent using the Service Academy Forums® mobile app
     
  11. TheSavage44

    TheSavage44 Member

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    Hats off to all the NFO selectees!

    -'13
     

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