CLIP-B Eligible Language List

Discussion in 'ROTC' started by bjc, Oct 19, 2011.

  1. bjc

    bjc Member

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    Does anyone know where I can find a current list of languages eligible for CLIP-B? I have been able to find lists for AY 2009-2010 but haven't been able to find any more current than that.

    Maybe Marist or Clarkson can help? Thanks...:smile:
     
  2. Marist College ROTC

    Marist College ROTC Member

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  3. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    1. Can anyone comment on which two or three languages might be considered the most critical to Army Intelligence over the next ten years?

    I am guessing that Russian is no longer as important as:

    Arabic
    Farsi
    Chinese
    Korean

    2. And disregarding the CLIP program for a moment, would a cadet be better advised to keep studying Spanish if they are at the beginner/intermediate level (through Spanish 4 in High School), or switch to a more critical language? The Branching desire is Intelligence, with an option after the military career of CIA or Foreign Service.
     
  4. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    Ah, never mind on the first question. Here's what I found by googling. this is a monograph from 2005. http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?AD=ADA437562

    From page 18:

    "The languages considered most critical by the Army are Arabic, Korean, Mandarin Chinese, Persian-Farsi, Russian, and Spanish. In 2002, the Army reported that it needed additional translators, interpreters, cryptologic linguists, and human intelligence collectors. In two of the six most languages, Korean and Mandarin Chinese, there was a twenty-five percent shortage ofcryptologic linguists. These specialists, who hold the Military Occupational Specialty (MOS),98G, are responsible for detecting and identifying foreign communications through the use of signals intelligence. They are also trained in translation and interrogation techniques. In five of the six most critical languages, Arabic, Russian, Spanish, Korean, and Mandarin Chinese there was a thirteen percent shortage of human intelligence collectors. These specialists, who holdthe 97E MOS, are responsible for collecting and providing information about the enemy by observing and monitoring enemy forces. They are also trained in interrogation and debriefing
     
  5. EDelahanty

    EDelahanty Member

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    Once again Ruritanian has been omitted from the list, which suggests that there will be no cadet deployments to Ruritania this summer.

    The Ruritanians have become resigned to the fact that neither the USA nor any other major country considers them to be of strategic interest.
     
  6. Packer

    Packer Member

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    Wow, I did not expect to see Spanish on the list.
     
  7. dunninla

    dunninla Member

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    ^ Re: Spanish

    Yeah, it's included in the Paper, but it is not included in the CLIP list of languages. I'm guessing the Army doesn't have to look far to find native spanish speakers, and although the demand is high (I think 1.2 Billion people in the world speak Spanish), the supply in the U.S. is pretty high too.
     
  8. kinnem

    kinnem Moderator

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    :topic:

    I understand the Duchy of Grand Fenwick shares their ire.
     
  9. bjc

    bjc Member

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