Coaches and Prep schools

Discussion in 'Service Academy Preparatory Schools' started by skydivingkittens, Feb 16, 2012.

  1. skydivingkittens

    skydivingkittens NWP '12

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    How much power does a coach have to send a recruited athlete to a SA prep school?
     
  2. JJBsDad

    JJBsDad Member

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    That's a great question. I hope someone in the know can post a response.
     
  3. globalview2

    globalview2 Member

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    I would assume quite a bit. Last year for both USAFA and USMA the coach had offered the prep school at NMMI, I live in NM as well, and this seemed to be mainly from the coaches recommendation
     
  4. RSMWilson

    RSMWilson Member

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    My son is a recruited athlete at USMAPS. As I understand it, each core sport coaching staff has a certain number of spots at the prep school available for their recruits who can qualify for admission.
     
  5. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    This quote says it all:

    And this:

    Pretty clear that NAPS is being used as a redshirt factory.
     
  6. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    If they are "qualified for admission" doesn't that make them "over qualified" for Prep?
     
  7. MemberLG

    MemberLG Member

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    The exact words were "can qualify for admission" not "qualified."
     
  8. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    OK - if they "can qualify" for admission aren't they over-qualified for prep?
     
  9. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    Like this basketball player profiled Thursday?

    http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/...s-va-sp-profile-0224-20120223,0,5470176.story

    Tell me again it's not a red-shirt factory for D1 athletes. :rolleyes:
     
  10. Just_A_Mom

    Just_A_Mom Member

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    Having a 4.0 and being a NHS member tells one NOTHING about being academically qualified for admission.
    Perhaps the high school has a steep weighting scale. Perhaps he never took any math beyond geometry. Perhaps he didn't take chemistry or physics. I can count a number of kids who graduated with my kid who got 4.0's or close and would not have qualified for admission.

    "can qualify" does not equal "does qualify". Can qualify for admission to the prep school does not mean they are qualified for admission to the academy.
    Prep schools take candidates who have the potential to qualify for the academy.
     
  11. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    You actually need to read the quote before you start your reply.

    Unless it is your assertion that those who are accepted "straight into the Naval Academy" are not qualified academically.

    :rolleyes:
     
  12. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

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    I would have expected better fact checking. Neither Alexander or Kelly is attending NAPS. There are only two players on the entire USNA varsity/JV rosters who attended NAPS. Both of these two individuals are enrolled in Alumni sponsored Foundation programs.

    Not sure what a “red shirt factory” is. However, NCAA compliance demands that the composition of NAPS recruited athletes is no greater than that of the Brigade as a whole-slightly less than 30%. Of course the FOIA hounds will find a single roster and bemoan the high percentage of NAPS grads, not realizing that most NAPSters are star high school athletes, they are required to participate in sports while attending NAPS, and that NAPS coaches are on the lookout for talent. Hence many varsity rosters contain NAPSters who are walk-ons. Secondly, do “red shirt factories” allow graduates to defect to the competition without penalty? Thirty or so of the recruited athletes attending NAPS each year never make it to USNA. Thirdly, do recruited athletes with strong WPMs, weak on academics, the same as their non-recruited classmates, not go on to become officers who serve their country with the same dedication as their non-recruited classmates?

    A universal truth is that no candidate wants to attend NAPS but once graduated they would never not have done so. We have here a candidate whose sole Academy contact is with a coach, probably a new coach since the head coach is new. There are candidates on this forum dealing with BGOs and RDs who are unsure of their status. It is a subject ripe with misunderstanding. I personally would not put a whole lot of credence in his statement to a sportswriter that he is qualified. Hence JAM's observation. Nor the new head coach planning to send five to NAPS. A couple to Foundation maybe.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2012
  13. Luigi59

    Luigi59 Banned

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    A red shirt factory is a service academy that uses the prep school as a de-facto 5th year to provide an extra year of practice and honing of athletic ability.

    This ain't rocket science, the data speaks for itself. Navy Lacrosse, football, and basketball all use the prep program to redshirt.

    Yes, a student from one of the top high schools (South Carroll) in one of the top counties (Carroll County) from the top rated state school system (Maryland), who achieves a 4.0 gpa, doesn't know if he's qualified.

    I'm dizzy from the spin.

    All of which gets back to answering the OP's question - yes, a coach has incredible power to send a kid to prep school. It is used with regularity to provide an additional year of athletic practice to prepare incoming prospects for D1 athletic competition.

    To claim otherwise is just sticking a head in the sand and ignoring the facts.
     
  14. Mongo

    Mongo Banned

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    We have already discussed that probably the reason there is a new lacrosse coach is the old coaches recruiting policies. Football, from all the data I have ever seen, seems to fall under the general guidelines of the percentages commensurate with that in the Brigade. If you have other data, not opinion, please provide. As far as basketball, you don't mention whether you are referring to men or women. Surely you don't mean men since only a total of two midshipmen, both freshmen, on the USNA roster are products of NAPS. Two out of twenty. A "redshirt factory"? There are three freshmen out of five total NAPSters on the women's roster. I suspect one or two are walk-ons. However, still hardly a "redshirt factory". Yep, "the data speaks for itself."
     
  15. JJBsDad

    JJBsDad Member

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    I don't see the problem in using NAPS as a place to get DI athletes ready for the academic and athletic rigors of a service academy. I think it's perfectly acceptable to allow student/athletes an extra year to get ready for the special demands of a service academy. Once these student/athletes get to USNA, USMA or USAFA, then they are expected to perform well in academic, military and athletic environments. I wish all the student/athletes at the various prep schools the best of luck in their future academic, military and athletic endeavors. Use that extra year to your benefit!!
     
  16. OhioWrestler

    OhioWrestler Member

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    JJBsDad -- your post was spot on!! My son is a plebe at USNA and spent last year at NAPS. My other son is a high school senioer and will be at MAPS this coming summer. The demands placed on athletes to succeed at the service academies are tremendous and spending a year at the prep school provides great a foundation for these young people to succeed. My son at USNA is doing extremely well and he credits a great deal of his success to the year he spent in Newport.
    -



     
  17. Bugn3boys

    Bugn3boys Member

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    So glad to hear this! DS is a recruited athlete for CGA and has been offered the Scholars Program. This confirms exactly what the coach and athletic director told DS. He is excited and humbled by the opportunity he has been given.
     

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